Tag Archives: ✪ what’s on

Marx Capital lecture course at Goldsmiths ✪

#Marx #Capital #lecture #course at #Goldsmiths #GoldsmithsUni ✪

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Public Lecture course on Marx’s “Capital” at Goldsmiths: everybody is welcome

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Capitalism and Cultural Studies – Prof John Hutnyk:

tuesday evenings from january 14, 2014 – 5pm-8pm Goldsmiths Room RHB 309. Free – all welcome.

No fee (unless, sorry, you are doing this for award) – and that, friends, is Willetts’ fault – though the Labour Party have a share of the blame too.

This course involves a close reading of Karl Marx’s Capital (Volume One).
90 minute lectures, 60 minutes discussion.

The connections between cultural studies and critiques of capitalism are considered in an interdisciplinary context (cinema studies, anthropology, musicology, international relations, and philosophy) which reaches from Marx through to Film Studies, from ethnographic approaches to Heidegger, from anarchism and surrealism to German critical theory and poststructuralism/post-colonialism/post-early-for-christmas. Topics covered include: alienation, commodification, production, technology, education, subsumption, anti-imperialism, anti-war movement and complicity. Using a series of illustrative films (documentary and fiction) and key theoretical texts (read alongside the text of Capital), we examine contemporary capitalism as it shifts, changes, lurches through its very late 20th and early 21st century manifestations – we will look at how cultural studies copes with (or does not cope with) class struggle, anti-colonialism, new subjectivities, cultural politics, media, virtual and corporate worlds.

The lectures/seminars begin on Tuesday 14th January 2014 between 5 and 8pm and will run for 11 weeks (with a week off in the middle) in the Richard Hoggart Building (Room 309), Goldsmiths College. You are required to bring their own copy of the Penguin, International Publishers/Progress Press or German editions of Karl Marx Capital Vol I. We are reading about 100 pages a week. (Please don’t get tricked into buying the abridged English edition/nonsense!)

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God on my side

You’d think that the plague of flies and other ills that accompanied the British siege of Delhi in 1857 might have been some sort of indication that divine approval of their slaughtering ways was not a given. This is what you get imperial warmongerers, many levels of grim – apologists take note.
Passage is from p258 of The Last Mughal, Dalrymple 2008.

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CCS Goldsmiths: LISTEN/WATCH

LISTEN/WATCH – recent Centre for Cultural Studies’ events:

canallondres.tv Report on May 22 Brazil Workshop at CCS (mostly in Portuguese language)
In conjunction with Mute: Slave to the Algorithm – including CCS PhD candidates Inigo Wilkins and Bogdan Dragos
The Matter of Contradiction Conference – Josie Berry Slater, Process Processed
At the ICA
 
 – John Hutnyk in conversation with Anthony Gormley and Hugh Brody
At Tate Modern – John Hutnyk on the theme of new cultural cartographies
Goldsmiths: ‘Double Evil’ – a talk with Matthew Fuller, Andrew Goffey and Eyal Weizman
Goldsmiths: Sylvia Federici public lecture
Goldsmiths: George Caffentzis’ public lecture
On BBC Radio 3: The Essay Scott Lash on ‘Liquid Modernity’

Meanwhile, across the river… The End of the World Cinema is Nigh… in E2 9QG

The first End of the World Cinema double feature kicks off this Sunday, 7pm at The Common House.

The films are Schwarzenegger’s The Running Man (1987) and The Hunger Games (2011), two necrotic reality TV shows set into the not too distant future. Door’s open at 6:30pm, with The Running Man starting at 7pm. See you there!

The End of the World Cinema
The end of the world will come, no doubt, with a whimper and not a bang. But the disappointing reality of catastrophe, its everyday-ness, it’s lack of entertainment value, leaves us cold. Which is why in place of the slow violence of the end, The End of the World Cinema presents a monthly double feature of some of the best (and worst) apocalyptic films to ensure your final days are nothing less than spectacular.

Apocalypse, the end of humanity and the world, disaster, catastrophe, and popcorn.

Film Schedule
July 28th: Running Man vs The Hunger Games
August 25th: Mad Max 2 vs The Quiet Earth
September 29th: I am Legend vs Monsters
October 20th: Soylent Green vs Delicatessen

Where: The Common House, Unit E, 5 Pundersons Gardens, E2 9QG

Marx Trot sunday, 2.30 archway tube…

Note 2014. Next Marx Trot is July 13 2014 Archway 2:30 all welcome

People saying wear something red for this – and as its gonna be sunny, wear sunscreen or be redder than red. lal salaam.

Marx Trot sunday, 2.30 archway tube…

Marx Trot 2013 [word to the wise: bring some tinnies in a bag – and some dosh for dinner in China town, and more beer of course – afraid we don’t have an Engels to subsidise us this year.]

karl-marx-grave-highgate

All welcome. A day of revolutionary dawdling, pints, and ending up awash somewhere on Tottenham Court Rd… The annual Marx trot this year will be on Sunday. Lal Salaam!

We will again be leaving from Archway tube 2:30 pm, then to Highgate Cemetery Marx’s Grave about 3pm – heading across the Heath to the Lord Southhampton pub which was the old man’s local on Grafton Terrace – then onwards to Engels’ house, then to the pub where the Manifesto was adopted by the Communist League, – now a crappy cocktail bar – and more… All welcome (kids could surely come for the first couple of hours – but warning, its a longish walk across the heath between Highgate and the Grafton Terrace HouseBYO libations for the first part.

.

Last year’s trot = https://hutnyk.wordpress.com/2012/07/03/marx-trot-2012-july-7-2/

(and links to previous) here: https://hutnyk.wordpress.com/2011/05/21/marx-trot-29-5-2011/

Pics of the houses: http://www.marxists.org/archive/marx/photo/london/index.htm

Other links:

http://www.alphabetthreat.co.uk/pasttense/pdf/communistclub.pdf

The Great Windmill Street venue is where Liebknecht says the Manifesto was adopted by the League of the Just/German Workers Educational Association/Communist League – but some say it was at the White Hart in Dury Lane. In any case Marx lectures on Capital at Great Windmill Street, but see here:http://www.alphabetthreat.co.uk/pasttense/pdf/communistclub.pdf

For Leninists – a diversion on the trot might take in Charing Cross station, and areas near Kings Cross and Pentonville:http://sarahjyoung.com/site/2011/01/16/russians-in-london-lenin/

Dancing the first international! http://history-is-made-at-night.blogspot.co.uk/2009_10_01_archive.html

A pub crawl with Karl http://www.mytimemachine.co.uk/pubcrawl.htm

The End of World Cinema (Common House, Bethnal Green)

EndoftheWorldCinemaThe end of the world will come, no doubt, with a whimper and not a bang. But the disappointing reality of catastrophe, its everyday-ness, it’s lack of entertainment value, leaves us cold. Which is why in place of the slow violence of the end, The End of the World Cinema presents a monthly double feature of some of the best (and worst) apocalyptic films to ensure your final days are nothing less than spectacular. Apocalypse, the end of humanity and the world, disaster, catastrophe, and popcorn.

Schedule – films start at 7pm

July 28th: Running Man vs The Hunger Games
August 25th: Mad Max 2 vs The Quiet Earth
September 29th: I am Legend vs Monsters
October 27th: Soylent Green vs Delicatessen

Where: The Common House, Unit E, 5 Pundersons Gardens, E2 9QG

Marx Trot, Sunday 2.30 archway tube…

Marx Trot 2013  [word to the wise: bring some tinnies in a bag – and some dosh for dinner in China town, and more beer of course – afraid we don’t have an Engels to subsidise us this year.]

karl-marx-grave-highgate

All welcome. A day of revolutionary dawdling, pints, and ending up awash somewhere on Tottenham Court Rd… The annual Marx trot. Lal Salaam!

We will again be leaving from Archway tube 2:30 pm, then to Highgate Cemetery Marx’s Grave about 3pm – heading across the Heath to the Lord Southhampton pub which was the old man’s local on Grafton Terrace – then onwards to Engels’ house, then to the pub where the Manifesto was adopted by the Communist League, – now a crappy cocktail bar – and more… All welcome (kids could surely come for the first couple of hours – but warning, its a longish walk across the heath between Highgate and the Grafton Terrace HouseBYO libations for the first part.

.

Last year’s trot = https://hutnyk.wordpress.com/2012/07/03/marx-trot-2012-july-7-2/

(and links to previous) here: https://hutnyk.wordpress.com/2011/05/21/marx-trot-29-5-2011/

Pics of the houses: http://www.marxists.org/archive/marx/photo/london/index.htm

Other links:

http://www.alphabetthreat.co.uk/pasttense/pdf/communistclub.pdf

The Great Windmill Street venue is where Liebknecht says the Manifesto was adopted by the League of the Just/German Workers Educational Association/Communist League – but some say it was at the White Hart in Dury Lane. In any case Marx lectures on Capital at Great Windmill Street, but see here:http://www.alphabetthreat.co.uk/pasttense/pdf/communistclub.pdf

For Leninists – a diversion on the trot might take in Charing Cross station, and areas near Kings Cross and Pentonville:http://sarahjyoung.com/site/2011/01/16/russians-in-london-lenin/

Dancing the first international! http://history-is-made-at-night.blogspot.co.uk/2009_10_01_archive.html

A pub crawl with Karl http://www.mytimemachine.co.uk/pubcrawl.htm

Talk – weds 10th Greenwich U

I’m redoing my east India company in Deptford talk at greenwich next weds. Any new news updates welcome. 

 

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What are the possibilities beyond middle class NIMBYisms* ? What lies beneath it?
* NIMBYism is a term, usually pejorative, to describe the Not In My Back Yard response of community spaceholders to ‘development’ not of their liking, choosing or design.
Rationale
Negotiations over the built, governed and lived environment are a key struggle of our times. We ask how they occur, what stories they tell and how they may be undertaken in future. This conference aims to connect academics, activists and practitioners interested in engaging, even playing, with the assemblage of built environment, social justice and political ecology, whether supportive or indifferent to recent Localism governmentalities at home or abroad.
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Format
The afternoon will begin with a keynote lecture from cultural theorist Prof John Hutnyk, followed by six short presentations and close with a screening of Riot From Wrong, a documentary exploring the London riots of August 2011.

Discussion and networking will be facilitated throughout with time and light refreshments. To help with logistics attendees are requested to email me on fuad.ali@gre.ac.uk by 5th July.

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Speaker lineup

The East as a Career: from Deptford to Calcutta and back, the present prehistory of the Convoys Wharf development
John Hutnyk, Centre for Cultural Studies, Goldsmiths (Keynote)

The Campaign Against Water Privatisation in Italy: Democratising Water from Below
Emanuele Lobina, Public Services International Research Unit, University of Greenwich

Unlimited dreams in limited spaces. The case of Geneva Camp, Dhaka
Ruhul Abdin, Paraa

Infertile ground: planting community gardeners to the bottom of the New York City garden movement (thesis submission permitting)
Liat Racin, Department of Geography, King’s College London

Regeneration for whom? The Battle of Lewisham Gateway
Helen Mercer, Campaigner

NIMBYtecture
Tim McGinley, Technologies for Sustainable Built Environments Centre, University of Reading

The conceptual range and register of Awkward Localisms
Fuad Ali, Sustainable Built Environment Research Group, University of Greenwich

Details
1pm to 615pm
Wednesday 10th July 2013
Lecture Theatre KW002
King William Court
University of Greenwich
30 Park Row
London SE10 9LS
Nearest station: Greenwich Cutty Sark

Crisis & Critique of the State: CFP, 25-26 Oct 2013, Centre for Cultural Studies, #Goldsmiths

Call for Papers
Crisis & Critique of the State
Interdisciplinary Graduate Conference 2013
25 – 26 October 2013, Goldsmiths, University of London
 
Keynote Speakers:
Sara Farris, Goldsmiths, University of London
Bob Jessop, Lancaster University
Massimiliano Tomba, University of Padua
 
The ongoing crisis poses the question of state and democracy anew. While
many commentators mourn the vanishing sovereignty of the state in the face
of financial markets and globalisation, and declare our times to be postdemocratic,
their nostalgic image of the glorious days of democracy and
sovereignty as bulwarks against capitalism is profoundly problematic. We
consider it therefore not only necessary to discuss the question of the state
and democracy again, but with Negri we could even say that “there must be a
structural theory of the State-capital-society relationship and a political
strategy adequate to the structural character of these interrelations.”
 
Revisit concepts and discussions…
The goal of the conference is to debate critical materialist notions of the state,
which do not fall back into vulgar conceptions that see the state simply as the
tool of the ruling class, but also refuse the common liberal position in which
the state becomes the mere mediator of conflicting interests. We consider
Poulantzas’s notion of the state as “the specific material condensation of a
relationship of forces among classes and class fractions” to be a fruitful
starting point. From Poulantzas’s perspective, which critically incorporates
Althusser’s earlier attempt to complexify a materialist concept of the state, the
state is the product of existing power relations; however, it can gain a relative
autonomy from those structures and in turn transform them. That is also the
backdrop against which democracy within capitalist societies can be
discussed productively. But the question of democracy goes beyond the
analysis of the existing: philosophical, social and empirical notions of
democracy, sovereignty and the political are key to any present discussion of
emancipatory politics.
 
…to address questions of the present.
We want to tie in with existing materialist conceptions and critiques of the
state and think through their relevance to the present. What does it mean for
the state to be the “ideal collective capitalist” (Engels) in times of the
economic crisis? Is there a notion of the state that we should defend and what
would it look like? What is a feminist critique of the state in the face of the
crisis (of reproduction)? These are only a few of the many questions we hope
to discuss from various disciplinary, theoretical as well as empirical,
perspectives.
 
Topics include but are not limited to:
– (materialist) state theories
– state-form, sovereignty and the law
– the crisis and critique of democracy, representation and popular sovereignty
– critiques of the nation state, citizenship and immigration policies
– the state and race
– feminist critiques of the state
– governmentality / management and resistance in the economic crisis
– the politics of austerity and their cultural and economic implications
– the role of the state and political economy
– (post-)politics and the political
– the relationship between democracy, populism and fascism
– revolution and the state
– the relation of philosophy and politics vis-à-vis the state
– violence, repression and the state: “policing the crisis”
– state & the commons
 
The call is primarily addressed to postgraduate students, young researchers,
activists, etc. We plan to have panels with academics from Goldsmiths and
other universities responding to the presentations.
 
Please send abstracts of not more than 500 words to
goldsmithsgradconference [at ] gmail.com by Monday, 29th of July 2013. We
also invite proposals for possible panels.

Lin Chen talk – 11:30 26 June 2013

CCS presents:

Lin Chen (Freie Universitat Berlin)
talk – 11:30 26 June 2013
Council Room Laurie Grove Baths Goldsmiths University of London

The year 2012 is Germany’s Chinese culture year. The organizers put forward the claim that original traditional Chinese culture would be presented. With regards to this the Jiangsu Kunqu Ensemble was invited to perform three “authentic” Zhe-zi Xi1/ One Act Kunqu as part of the opening ceremony in February. Luzia Braun, the “Stellvertretende Leiterin des ZDF-Kulturmagzins Aspekte” was invited as the moderator. The performance lasted two nights in Konzerthaus Berlin.

Generally speaking it was a nice experience, the live accompaniment impressed the audience favorably, yet the performance was a little different from my former Kunqu experience in China. They saved the expense to transport the essential stage requisites, namely one desk and two chairs to Berlin. Without them, two female performers seemed clumsy in showing some beautiful stylized gestures from the Peony Pavilion.

After the performance an intense interview process was held. Towards the end, the moderator Luzia Braun proposed her master-stroke to Ke Jun, director of the Jiangsu Kunqu ensemble, “Herr Ke, would you tell us the most obvious difference between Kunqu and Peking Opera?” “Well”, Ke Jun answered determinately, “Peking Opera is entertainment, but Kunqu is culture.”

Lin Chen is a doctoral candidate in Interweaving Performance Cultures at FU Berlin, and an Erasmus visiting student in the Centre for Cultural Studies PhD program at Goldsmiths.

Details also here

Marx Trot 2013 – July 7

karl-marx-grave-highgate

All welcome. A day of revolutionary dawdling, pints, and ending up awash somewhere on Tottenham Court Rd… The annual Marx trot this year will be on July 7. Lal Salaam!

We will again be leaving from Archway tube 2:30 pm, then to Highgate Cemetery Marx’s Grave about 3pm – heading across the Heath to the Lord Southhampton pub which was the old man’s local on Grafton Terrace – then onwards to Engels’ house, then to the pub where the Manifesto was adopted by the Communist League, – now a crappy cocktail bar – and more… All welcome (kids could surely come for the first couple of hours – but warning, its a longish walk across the heath between Highgate and the Grafton Terrace HouseBYO libations for the first part.

.

Last year’s trot = https://hutnyk.wordpress.com/2012/07/03/marx-trot-2012-july-7-2/

(and links to previous) here: https://hutnyk.wordpress.com/2011/05/21/marx-trot-29-5-2011/

Pics of the houses: http://www.marxists.org/archive/marx/photo/london/index.htm

Other links:

http://www.alphabetthreat.co.uk/pasttense/pdf/communistclub.pdf

The Great Windmill Street venue is where Liebknecht says the Manifesto was adopted by the League of the Just/German Workers Educational Association/Communist League – but some say it was at the White Hart in Dury Lane. In any case Marx lectures on Capital at Great Windmill Street, but see here:http://www.alphabetthreat.co.uk/pasttense/pdf/communistclub.pdf

For Leninists – a diversion on the trot might take in Charing Cross station, and areas near Kings Cross and Pentonville:http://sarahjyoung.com/site/2011/01/16/russians-in-london-lenin/

Dancing the first international! http://history-is-made-at-night.blogspot.co.uk/2009_10_01_archive.html

A pub crawl with Karl http://www.mytimemachine.co.uk/pubcrawl.htm

SAVE OUR FIRE STATIONS


SAVE OUR FIRE STATIONS
 

Here is a list of public consultation meetings across London to discuss the proposed fire station closures, and the subsequent job loses. Please try to attend your local meeting to make sure your concerns are heard.

 

Tuesday May 21st – Merton and SuttonWednesday May 22nd – Lewisham

Thursday May 23rd – Bexley, Bromley and Croydon

Tuesday May 28th – Islington

Wednesday May 29th – Greenwich

Thursday May 30th – Camden

Monday June 3rd – Havering and Redbridge

Tuesday June 4th – Kingston and Richmond

Monday June 10th – Kensington and Chelsea

Tuesday June 11th – Westminster

For a full list of details please visit
http://www.london-fire.gov.uk/LSP5-public-meetings.asp

What’s on this week – via CCS!

Wednesday 22 May

Brazil: A Landscape in Motion

Ben Pimlott Lecture Theatre, 10am – 6pm
Day workshop on Brazil with various guest speakers, -plus book launch. (more details…)

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Thursday 23 May

Ken Wark

137, Richard Hoggart Building. http://wp.me/pcKI3-1L2., 6.30pm – 8.30pm
A talk by Professor McKenzie Wark of the New School for Social Research, NYC (more details…)

____________________________________________________________________

Sunday 26 May

Docklands Cinema Club with CCS sun 26.5.2013

The Three Burials of Melquiades Estrada (2005)
Sun 26 May, 2-4pm (15)
Winner of the Best Actor and Best Screenplay awards at Cannes 2005, Tommy Lee Jones’ directorial debut follows the story of Pete Perkins,
a ranch foreman in the high desert of west Texas who undertakes a dangerous and quixotic journey into Mexico.

© BBC Film Council / The Kobal Collection

Venue Museum of London Docklands see here.

Ken Wark at Goldsmiths 23.5.2013

Ken Wark – A (Post) Situationist, (Pre) Situationist Aesthetics

A talk by Professor McKenzie Wark of the New School for Social Research, NYC

McKenzie Wark

The New School for Social Research

There can of course be no such thing as a Situationist aesthetics, there can only be one that anticipates the realization and overcoming of the aesthetic into everyday life. Hence our topic is necessarily Pre-Situationist aesthetics. The particular examples I want to talk about are Debord’s films of the 70s: Society of the Spectacle and Refutation of All Judgements. Based on interviews with Debord’s film editor, I will talk about the process by which these films were made, but also how they are something more than theory texts illustrated with détourned images. There’s a critical logic to the editing as well. These films were of course made after the dissolution of the Situationist International, and so in that sense are post-Situationist.

Event Information

Location: 137, Richard Hoggart Building
Cost: free
Department: Centre For Cultural Studies
Time: 23 May 2013, 18:30 – 20:30

Docklands Cinema Club with CCS sun 26.5.2013

The Three Burials of Melquiades Estrada (2005)
Sun 26 May, 2-4pm (15)
Winner of the Best Actor and Best Screenplay awards at Cannes 2005, Tommy Lee Jones’ directorial debut follows the story of Pete Perkins,
a ranch foreman in the high desert of west Texas who undertakes a dangerous and quixotic journey into Mexico.

© BBC Film Council / The Kobal Collection

Venue Museum of London Docklands see here.

Goldsmiths UCU and SU Rally against Austerity 15.5.2013

Goldsmiths UCU and SU Rally against Austerity – (THURSDAY) 6pm

  • In the light of our 0.8% pay offer – well below the rate of inflation
  • In the light of today’s story about the impact of tuition fee rises (that many courses are not good ‘value for money’)
  • In the light of today’s OECD report warning that austerity policies ‘are widening the gulf between rich and poor’ in the UK

please come to the rally 6pm Thursday 16 May, RHB 137 to hear

Andrew McGettigan, author of The Great University Gamble (Pluto)
Aaron Kiely (NUS Black Students Officer)
Save Lewisham Hospital speaker
Romayne Phoenix (Green Party and CoR)
Lindsey German (Stop the War)
Rachael Maskell (Unite national officer)

Mrinal Sen 90

Mrinal SenMrinal Sen is 90 today (May 14 2013) and all the best to him. 

I would argue that he is the greatest living film director, bare none.This YouTube page has some films by and on Sen: http://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=%22Mrinal+Sen%22&oq=%22Mrinal+Sen%22&gs_l=youtube.3…2259.6576.0.9023.12.11.0.0.0.0.0.0..0.0…0.0…1ac.1.11.youtube. (Thanks Abhijit).

there is also a few parts of his films and one complete on the amazing annotated resource known as https://indiancine.ma you need to sign up for this one, but its great.

I will screen a number of Sen films – especially the Maoist period Calcutta films – Interview, Calcutta 71 and Padatik – in the monday night film screening slot in Autumn term at Goldsmiths. He gave Amitabh B his first break, he made Shabana A an actress, he showed Louis M the way round the city, and more and more. Come along to the screenings – check the what’s on back here or the Goldsmiths Centre for Cultural Studies events calendar for info in late September (it will also be a course for credit as part of the new MA Critical Asian Studies, but its open to all comers like other CCS courses).

riot notes –

riotnotes

This is a rough page of old notes from the work that became Tom and my article on a years worth of riot-chatter. The article was published in the Journal of Cultural Research (2012) here. Today I am updating this for a couple of talks at Goldsmiths where I hope to also frame a critique of jingoistic national feel good isms. Do keep calm dearie and all that sort of carry on. Talk one is “Public Engagement: the 11th thesis” Wednesday 15th May, 2013 Room RHB 137a. Talk two is ‘University Research in World War III’ at about 3pm in the “ethics/learning and teaching in higher education@ workshop – you can get the venue details after registering at: http://www.gold.ac.uk/calendar/?id=6211

May Day London 2013

  • Screen Shot 2013-04-29 at 09.32.23

    May Day March & Rally

    Date: 1 May 2013

    Venue: Form up at Clerkenwell Green at 12 noon.

    Join the 2013 May Day march and rally in London. The march will form up at Clerkenwell Green at 12 noon moving off at 1.00 pm. It  will end in a rally at Trafalgar Square.

    Further details are here http://www.londonmayday.org/

     

Common Ground Film Series

Common Ground Film Series

 

Film series leading up to Common Ground Conference on 24-25 June 2013.


Event Information

Location: Council Rm, n/a, Laurie Grove Baths
Cost: Free. All Welcome
Department: Centre For Cultural Studies

Times:

  • 3 June 2013, 19:00 – 22:00
    The Black Power Mixtape
  • 10 June 2013, 19:00 – 22:00
    Geschwister
  • 17 June 2013, 19:00 – 22:00
    Five Obstructions
  • 24 June 2013, 19:00 – 22:00
    Delicatessen

Manual Labours

manual labours8-12 April, 10-6pm
 Peltz Room, 43 Gordon Square, London WC1H 0PD
FREE Public Events (no need to book):
Wednesday 10 April, 7pm
The Trainee – Screening and Discussion | Birkbeck Cinema, 43 Gordon Square, London, WC1H 0PD
Marina Vishmidt will discuss Pilvi Takala’s performance and film ‘The Trainee’ (2008) in light of her research into how art models the anomalous labour conditions of financialized capitalism.Friday 12 April, 1-2pm

The Working Lunch | Peltz room, Birkbeck University, 43 Gordon Square, London, WC1H 0PD
Public lunch hour and discussion led by Sophie Hope and Jenny Richards.  Food provided!
Manual Labours is a long term research project exploring people’s physical relationships to work, initiated by Jenny Richards and Sophie Hope. This project reconsiders current time-based structures of work (when does work start and end?) and reasserts the significance of the physical (manual) aspect of immaterial, affective and emotional labour.
Manual Labours starts with a 35 hour ‘working week’-long investigation into the embodied, sensory, emotional affects of work which will include meetings with our co-workers, a 9 mile walk to work, film screenings and a Public Lunch Hour.
Through this project we are interested in exploring the transformation of labour processes through an investigation into the ‘physical’ relationship to work in order to map complex and overlapping experiences of work/life entwinement. During this first public manifestation of Manual Labours we will be building an archive of films and publications, alongside public screenings and discussions with co-workers to inform ways in which we can recapture a sense of agency within our current positions.   Developing research in a public setting through performative actions, each day of our week-long presence at Birkbeck focuses on one worker stereotype in order to research how these different ‘posts’ are de-stabled through everyday practices.Two public events hope to generate conversations and contributions which will shape the evolvement of Manual Labours and allow us to explore the shared, collective concerns and tactics for reclaiming a critical and sensory experience of work/life.  Join us on Wednesday 10th April 7pm when writer Marina Vishmidt will discuss Pilvi Takala’s film ‘The Trainee’ and on Friday we’ll be offering a communal lunch hour with home cooked food and a discussion reflecting on the week’s activities led by Sophie Hope and Jenny Richards.

Visit www.manuallabours.wordpress.com for full details of the daily programme.
Films accessible within the Manual Labours archive include: ‘Sweet Sugar Rage’ (1985) by the Sistren Theatre Collective which explores different theatre methods to highlight the harsh conditions facing female workers on a Jamaican sugar estate, distributed by Cinenova;  Moira Zoitl’s ‘Exchange Square’ (2007) exploring domestic workers in Hong Kong; Can Altay’s ‘We’re Papermen, He said’ (2003) which follows the operations of unofficial recyclers and rubbish men in Ankara; extracts of Marie Barrett’s ‘Remnant’ (2008), documenting oral histories of the closure of the garment factories in North-West Ireland and Kennedy Browne’s ‘How Capital Moves’ (2010), a film which uses anecdotes of redundancy and insecure working conditions to explore the precarious nature of working for a multinational company.
Manual Labours is supported by the Centre for Media, Culture and Creative Practice, Birkbeck (http://www.bbk.ac.uk/creative/), Sophie Hope and Jenny Richards.
For updates on the weekly programme of talks, discussions and screenings visit www.manuallabours.wordpress.com
To find out more, get involved or contribute, please contact manual.labours@gmail.com

Brazil: A Landscape in Motion – workshop 22.5.2013

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Full details download here: Brazil_conference Program. 10am- 6pm.

VENUE BEN PIMLOTT LECTURE THEATRE BEN PIMLOTT BUILDING, Goldsmiths London SE14 6NW Centre for Cultural Studies | Goldsmiths University of London London SE14 6NW

ORGANIZERS Rosana Martins is a Visiting Research Fellow at the Centre for Cultural Studies, at Goldsmiths University, London. Holly Eva Ryan is a fourth year PhD student at the City University, London and visiting ERASMUS fellow at the Universiti Brunei Darussalam.

Talk: Braga 9.4.2013

‘Seems like the funky days, they’re back again’ – 1960s fashion and subcontinental politics in the 21st Century? – John Hutnyk
 
This talk will consider the resurgence of an Asia-inflected 1960s aesthetic and a thoroughly modern politics in the present. To what extent does a kaleidoscopic reference in fashion and sound make room for a political activism that owes more to street protest than an updated digital-cultural exoticism. The work of Sri Lankan musician M.I.A will feature, as will Frank Zappa and the Monkeys psychedelic era masterpiece ‘Head’.

2:30 9 April 2013

Location: Braga, North of Portugal, at the Gualtar campus of the University of Minho. The building is the Institute of Arts and Humanities (Instituto de Letras e Ciências Humanas – ILCH) and the room is the ILCH Auditorium.

Call for Papers: Common Ground 24-25 June 2013.

Common Ground – A Two-Day Conference organized by the Centre for Cultural Studies

24-25 June 2013. Goldsmiths, University of London, UK

Call for Papers:

Postgraduates in the Centre for Cultural Studies are pleased to announce their annual conference. This year’s theme is Common Ground and we would like to invite papers, artistic presentations, workshops and panel proposals on all aspects of this topic.

This conference comes out of a shared frustration with the framing of canonical discourses. For every subject and object in the world, there is a linear story of its explanation– a forward-projecting narration of origins, development, transformation and signification. What is accomplished in this expository process is a reductivism that not only privileges particular modes of explanation, of knowing, but in doing so also neutralizes the grounds of subversive potential.  How can we explode these centralizing rationalities and reconfigure the conceptual space of knowing? How can we think critically about literal and metaphorical spaces and the accompanying temporalities which claim to bring individuals together and form alternative modes of collective being but simply end up privileging dominant, homogenising discourses of social control and organization?

Possible topics could include but are by no means limited to:

–       Privileging narratives

–       Writing and Rewriting History

–       Time, history and asynchronicity

–       Dissenting Voices

–       Homogeneity and hegemony

–       Interiority/exteriority

–       Discourses of Inclusion/Exclusion

–       The collective vs. the individual

–       Who are the 99%?

–       Nationalism and Identity

–       Digital Technologies and posthumanism

–       Crossing borders and limits

–       Institutional Critique

–       Spaces of convergence – the street, the square

–       Public vs. private spaces

–       Encounters, confrontations, conflicts

–       The production of difference

–       Subversive spaces and temporalities

Abstracts should be no longer than 500 words and emailed to:

ccscommonground2013@gmail.com. Deadline for submissions is 26 April 2013. For more information please visit www.commonground2013.wix.com/conference

Communist Horizon – book talk 7pm today (19.3.13)

A book talk by Jodi Dean, author.

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The Communist Horizon charts the re-emergence of communism as a magnet for political energy following the collapse of the Soviet Union and the stalling of the Occupy movement.

Jodi Dean will introduce the book – 45 minutes approx – then answer questions from the audience, followed by wine reception and book signing. Lal salaam.


Event Information

Location: rm309, 3rd floor, Richard Hoggart Building, Goldsmiths
Cost: free
Department: Centre For Cultural Studies
Time: 19 March 2013, 19:00 – 21:00


For Further Details

E-mail: john.hutnyk

– See more at: http://www.gold.ac.uk/calendar/?id=6283#sthash.ly0s3RBo.dpuf

THE CONDITION OF THE WORKING CLASS: 8 May 2013

Film A5 (Goldsmiths) flyerTHE CONDITION OF THE WORKING CLASS (82 mins)
A new documentary feature film by Michael Wayne & Deirdre O’Neill
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SCREENING FOLLOWED BY Q&A WITH DIRECTORS
Goldsmiths RHB Room 144, 6.30pm. Weds 8 May 2013.

Synopsis

Everything changes and yet everything stays the same. 1844: Friedrich Engels writes his book ‘The Condition of the Working Class in England’, a classic denunciation of the appalling living conditions for working people living at the heart of the industrial revolution in Manchester, England.  In 2012: a group of working class people from Manchester and Salford have the job of devising a theatrical show from scratch based on their own experiences and Engels’ book. They have 8 weeks before their first performance. The Condition of the Working Class follows the process from the first rehearsal to first night and situates their struggle to get the show on stage in the context of the daily struggles of working people facing economic crisis and austerity politics.

‘This is not a film, it’s a rehearsal for revolution’ – Film International.

“If you want to see how, fundamentally, the way people see and treat each other in Britain has not changed in over 160 years watch this film. Some things have changed. People have sewers now, £9 JSA a day, are taught to read, but not really to write or speak. We still look up and down at each other in ways we did then, betray ourselves through our accents, our dress  our work – if we can get a job. It might be theatre but it’s not acting. It’s a blow against the mean low money grabbers.”   –   Danny Dorling

See The Trailer for The Condition of the Working Class, a new documentary film directed by Mike Wayne and Deirdre O’Neill
at: http://www.conditionoftheworkingclass.info/about-2