What is science in Social Science and what has the history of Philosophy had to say about it?

What is science in Social Science and what has the history of Philosophy had to say about it? Well, so glad you asked – I can talk for three hours about this and only scratch the surface…

What is science in Social Science and what has the history of Philosophy had to say about it?

cut from the draft of the pecuniary animus of the university…

We might consider the university as that space where the practice of education for life, with all its contemporary contextualisations, difficulties and possibilities, is a collective responsibility and resource, and so all have an interest in participation within, and ownership of, its spaces. The resources of which the university can be custodian are many, they should not be sequestered to the privileged few. If we must characterize the present conjuncture in some way relevant to the shape and place of the university in societal life, we might remark on several such resources (some more obviously progressive than others):

  • collective inquiry, multifaceted interdisciplinarity
  • team work, research teams, networks
  • training, questioning, critique
  • libraries, databases, tertiary retentional devices, algorithms
  • translation, cultural communications
  • hive-mind, conceptual, automated
  • administration, organization, plasticity
  • gender, difference, inclusion-exclusion
  • technology, environment, animals, events
  • service, affect, desolation, automation
  • competition, disposability, composition
  • digitalisation, proletarianisation
  • bureaucratisation, auditing, calculus

.

Is it not possible to reject the elitist presumption that only some people are suited to research or salon theory? Luxemburg (1913), Gramsci (1971), Mao (1949), Spivak (2102) could each be deployed to illustrate both the necessity and potential of bringing all cadre onto the path of knowledge ‘management’ – even if that word is code for separating head and hand, salon and grunt, rich and poor. For some, just saying it this way is to name a prejudice – white supremacy – that joins a much larger battle in which the effort is destroy and displace outmoded assumptions. Even in a minor militant mode…

Spivak: What time is it on the world clock?

Spivak on time, speaking on education and critiquing the knowledge management toolkit template at die Akademie des Verlernens \unlearning academy\. Has some anecdotes of crying boys and vids from the field to soften you up, then in a rising tone, strikes several times and clocks you for six.
 

When the press covers news

Pg-3-rohingya-by-Katie-Sims

Katie Sims / Sun Staff Photographer

Prof Urges Students to Consider Oppression of The Rohingya

The Rohingya crisis has been termed a “textbook example of ethnic cleansing” and one of the worst humanitarian disasters of this decade. At Cornell, organizations will be rallying to raise awareness about the crisis in November, but students were able to hear about it firsthand from Prof. Gayatri Spivak, English and comparative literature, Columbia, on Monday.

The Rohingya are a stateless Indo-Aryan, dominantly Muslim people living in Myanmar. They are persecuted in a country where Buddhism is the prevalent religion, and they are even denied citizenship.

Spivak, an activist for rural education in Asia, first encountered the Rohingya in Bangladesh in the 1980s, where she said she saw them being shot at as they attempted to cross the Naf River, which marks the boundary between Bangladesh and Myanmar.

“I have never seen human beings so degraded by oppression, so robbed of dignity,” Spivak said.

Today, she said she feels a need to “speak for them, to them, and about them” whenever possible.

Spivak urged her audience to not only consider the Rohingya as a minority oppressed group, but to also regard them as human beings. Rather than think “they are like us,” imagine “we are like them,” she said.

Spivak said that  unless we can envision ourselves as the same as them — as human beings — all the same, it is not worth it in the long run working to emancipate them.

“They cannot represent themselves, so they must be represented” by us, she said.

While in Myanmar, she witnessed a couple of Rohingya women sitting in the mud. Born in Calcutta, India, and similar in appearance, Spivak said she was willing to stand in the most impoverished parts of Myanmar and immerse herself completely in the culture.

The Rohingya women “saw something in my face” and thought “this is one of us,” Spivak said. “They spoke to me … They could tell I thought they were human beings. This was a huge discovery.”

The ability to draw a response from the other side acted as the impetus to dedicate herself to the Rohingya issue and reach out to these mistreated men and women, Spivak said.

One major abuse Rohingya women face is rape, Spivak said.

“Rape is at work all over the world, including in countries where we live,” she said.

In Myanmar, it is both a millennial tradition and a weapon to ethnic cleanse, Spivak said.

Furthermore, the Rohingya lack equality in regards to the people of Myanmar. In the nation-state, they are denied citizenship and cannot vote.

The Rohingya are not technically illegal immigrants, but they are stateless, Spivak said.

“We can relate [this] to Mexico. We can relate it to all kinds of places. One day, it was my place. Next day, it became illegal,” she said. “The land under my foot becomes illegal because it belongs to someone else.”

Marx in Algiers again

Of haircuts and Rhino coats…

screen-shot-2017-01-08-at-21-23-45

This is the worked up text of a talk I gave in Chandernagore in February 2016. The photo is one I’ve failed to trace from the dates and evidence in the letters (see below) of the visit to the barber – if anyone is good at that sort of tracking, please let me know, the photographer of the first one is E. Dutertre, and the second, if authentic, probably the same.

[Added 3 April 2018 – increasingly the suspicion that the makeover photo is photoshopped is being confirmed. Michael Krätke includes the two portraits in a recent article with the caption:

“Figure 1. Left: last photograph of Karl Marx, taken by E. Dutertre in Algiers, on 28 April 1882.Right: a photomontage based upon Marx’s own correspondence, where he said that the photo was taken just a short while before he went to the barber to have his hair cut and his beard shaved off, and shows how he may have looked after his visit to the barber.
Left: IISH Collection BG A9/383. Right: creator and origins unknown.”

Krätke, Michael 2018 ‘Marx and World History’. International Review of Social History, doi:10.1017/S0020859017000657 page 13

There is also a fiction volume called Marx’s Beard I have not yet read, and marx in Algiers, mentioned elsewhere. So this story has a few loose ends still.

And the source for all this, the photo itself, Marx writes a ps in a letter to Fred on 28 April 1882 in Algiers saying he will pick up the photo in two days. From the MEGA 3(4):

28 April 1882 aus Algiers

 

screen-shot-2017-01-08-at-21-21-48

[The rest of this article is being rewritten and will be linked to here in due course. Thanks to those who already downloaded a copy, and stay tuned for more after I deal with the substantial and helpful comments of reviewers].

 

 

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