Spaces in Migration – Film Screening and Book Launch 14.10.2013

From Limit Experience:

14 October, 6pm Onwards. Cinema, RHB, Goldsmiths

An evening of film screenings, discussion examining the experiences of Tunisian migrants during and after the Arab Spring of 2011. The event which includes a drinks reception will celebrate the launch of Spaces in Migration: Postcards of a Revolution edited by Glenda Garelli, Federica Sossi and Martina Tazzioli (Pavement Books, 2013).

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Two films looking at life in the refugee camp at Choucha located on the Tunisian-Libyan border will be screened:

The first, a short made by the editors of Spaces in Migration during their visit to the camp in 2013. This will be followed by a brief discussion and introduction to the book which features interviews with those living in the camp alongside critical, philosophical reflections on the implications of various migrations and responses of European border control agencies which occurred in the wake of the Tunisian revolution together with the war in Libya. There will also be a skype link-up with Tunisian activists.

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Babylon (Exit Productions, 2012) won the top prize at the FIDMarseille festival in 2012. Directed by ismaël, Youssef Chebbi, Ala Eddine Slim, the film eschews subtitles, pushing viewers to focus their attention on the cacophony of languages and sounds encountered in the camp together with the visual, physical forms of communication which accompany and supplement oral communication.

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Attendance is free. All Welcome.

14 October 2013, 6pm.

The Cinema (small hall), Richard Hoggart Building, Goldsmiths,

University of London.

Copies of Spaces in Migration: Postcards of a Revolution will be on sale at the discount price of £10 (list price £15.99).

‘The Advocate’ – screening and discussion [Uni of Westminster 23.10.2013]

You are invited to the screening of ‘The Advocate’ and to participate in the discussions on the role of civil liberties movements in the context of development, resistance and repression in India and elsewhere.

‘The Advocate’ documentary film on civil liberties, social movements and state in Andhra Pradesh, India

Wednesday 23 October 2013, 6.30-9pm

Venue: ‘The Pavilion’ University of Westminster, Cavendish Building
115 New Cavendish Street, London, W1W 6UW

The documentary film ‘The Advocate’ focuses on the life and work of late G. Kannabiran, India’s foremost lawyer and champion of civil liberties. The film highlights state repression including extra-judicial killings, political prisoners and violations of civil liberties of the Maoist movement that forms the context for his work in the state of Andhra Pradesh in India. The context includes the socio-economic causes for the insurgency and its repression and the role of civil liberties movement in India in engaging the wider social issues. The documentary comes at a time of widespread state repression of popular movements in India including use of death penalties, rejection of clemency petitions, high numbers of political prisoners including women political prisoners, extra judicial killings, widespread use of torture, custodial rape, deployment of armed forces and lack of fair trials. The film highlights the context to the resistance and repression which, in most cases, lie in socio-economic deprivations and social polarisations. The film opens up the spaces for debate on the state of civil liberties in India, seen as the most populous democracy in the world, and more widely, the assumptions about human rights, civil liberties, economic polarisation and socio-economic deprivations more generally in other Third World countries.

Chaired by Prof Penny Green, International State Crime Initiative, Kings College London

Panelists include

Dr Radha D’Souza, University of Westminster, School of Law
Saleh Mamon, Campaign Against Criminalising Communities (CAMPACC)
John Hutnyk, Professor of Cultural Studies, Centre for Cultural Studies at Goldsmiths University of London

Organised by CAMPACC, Development & Conflict group, School of Law, University of Westminster; International State Crime Initiative; Haldane Society of Socialist Lawyers

THIS IS A FREE EVENT. ALL WELCOME!

For information & RSVP contact: CAMPACC: Estella Schmid e-mail: estella24@tiscali.co.uk
Tel 020 7586 5892 www.campacc.org.uk <http://www.campacc.org.uk>

Development and Conflict Group: R. Seenivasan – ramasas@westminster.ac.uk

FILMS ON MAU MAU: THE FIRST GRADER AND ON GUANTANAMO, SHAKER AAMER 13 OCT 2013

PLEASE CIRCULATE
VENUE: BOLIVAR HALL, 54 GRAFTON WAY, LONDON W1T 5DL
Sunday 13th Ocotber; 10.20 for 11am
THE FIRST GRADER
Justin Chadwick, Ireland 2010 [12], 103 mins
This drama brings the case of the Mau Mau freedom fighters against the British to life with the story of Maruge, a villager motivated to read by the offer of free primary education. The 84-year-old pupil and his young teacher defy the underlying tensions within the local community but not before he gently educated the students about Kenya’s fight for independence. Based on the true story of Kimani Maruge and his fight for the education he could never afford.

Palm Beach international Award 2011; Emden Film Award 2011


SHAKER AAMER: A DECADE OF INJUSTICE
Mark Saunders, UK 2010 [E], 22 mins
Shaker Aamer is still held at Guantanamo bay without charges or a trial. This film documents the on-going struggle of his family with legal, political and human rights activists campaigning for his release. Although two US presidents have ‘cleared’ his release due to lack of evidence, he remains detained. What is the fear of the authorities denying his release – his knowledge of the UK government’s complicity in torture, his witnessing of the multiple Guantanamo suicides or the wider political implications of his incarceration?
Discussion led by Dan Thea, Mau Mau Justice Network, Mark Saunders and Joy Hurcombe, Chair, Save Shaker Aamer Campaign

Meanwhile, across the river… The End of the World Cinema is Nigh… in E2 9QG

The first End of the World Cinema double feature kicks off this Sunday, 7pm at The Common House.

The films are Schwarzenegger’s The Running Man (1987) and The Hunger Games (2011), two necrotic reality TV shows set into the not too distant future. Door’s open at 6:30pm, with The Running Man starting at 7pm. See you there!

The End of the World Cinema
The end of the world will come, no doubt, with a whimper and not a bang. But the disappointing reality of catastrophe, its everyday-ness, it’s lack of entertainment value, leaves us cold. Which is why in place of the slow violence of the end, The End of the World Cinema presents a monthly double feature of some of the best (and worst) apocalyptic films to ensure your final days are nothing less than spectacular.

Apocalypse, the end of humanity and the world, disaster, catastrophe, and popcorn.

Film Schedule
July 28th: Running Man vs The Hunger Games
August 25th: Mad Max 2 vs The Quiet Earth
September 29th: I am Legend vs Monsters
October 20th: Soylent Green vs Delicatessen

Where: The Common House, Unit E, 5 Pundersons Gardens, E2 9QG

The Resistance of Others

Some films just need to be made. You may want to support this project is to complete the edit of a cinematic feature documentary on the struggles for justice by families of those who have died in state custody in the UK.
Migrant Media is a group of radical film-makers with a focus on work about resistance, race and class. We function as a creative collective and have been visually documenting experiences in various communities since 1989 in television and cinema production. We have a strong community grounding with an international reputation for challenging and innovative work. Our prize-winning films have been recognised by many national and international awards at major film festivals. We produced ‘Injustice’a feature length documentary about deaths in state custody that we spent seven years making and the past ten years screening across the world. A recent article by Peter Bradshaw in The Guardian is here. ‘Injustice’ directly challenged the those responsible for these deaths and helped to force reform of the Police Complaints Authority and the review of the Crown Prosecution Service. We also recently produced ‘Who Polices The Police’ .
The time has come to complete ‘The Resistance of Others’. Since records began in 1969, there have been over 2000 police custody deaths. The film will be a creative exploration of why there has never been a successful prosecution of police officers and why these human rights abuses continue despite overwhelming evidence. ‘The Resistance of Others’ will include updates on the cases featured in ‘Injustice’ and will also cover strategic new cases and current developments. It will use narrative poetry and intimate cinema verite filmed over the past decade to make a moving and compelling film.
Current status: ‘Injustice’ took 7 years to make ‘The Resistance of Others’ has also taken 7 years. Research and production of the film began in 2005 and was funded by the Joseph Rowntree Charitable Trust, the Churches Commission for Racial Justice, the Lipman Miliband Trust and private donations. The film has now been shot and is in need of post-production finance. Completion date will be September 2013.
Budget: Funds are required to complete post-production on the film and initial distribution. Migrant Media is run on a non-profit basis and does not receive any form of regular funding. All our work is supported through appeals and project specific grants allowing us to retain a high level of creative and cultural independence.
What people said about ‘Injustice':
“One of the most powerful films ever made” The Guardian
“Moving and militant” The Gleaner
“A rousing hymn to united struggle” Time Out – Critic’s Choice
Donate right now here:

Diological highlights from Sweet Smell of Success

the good folk at IMDB typed up the best bits (erm Spoiler Alert, sort of – the plot is jumbled here, but you wanna see the movie first anyways):

 

J.J. Hunsecker: Mr. Falco, let it be said at once, is a man of 40 faces, not one – none too pretty, and all deceptive. You see that grin? That’s the, eh, that’s the Charming Street Urchin face. It’s part of his helpless act: he throws himself upon your mercy. He’s got a half-dozen faces for the ladies. But the one I like, the really cute one, is the quick, dependable chap. Nothing he won’t do for you in a pinch – so he says. Mr. Falco, whom I did not invite to sit at this table tonight, is a hungry press agent, and fully up to all the tricks of his very slimy trade.
[Pulls out an unlit cigarette and faces Falco]
J.J. Hunsecker: Match me, Sidney.
Sidney Falco: Not right this minute, J.J.

Lt. Harry Kello: Come back, Sidney… I wanna chastise you…

J.J. Hunsecker: What’s this boy got that Susie likes?
Sidney Falco: Integrity – acute, like indigestion.
J.J. Hunsecker: What does that mean – integrity?
Sidney Falco: A pocket fulla firecrackers – looking for a match!
[grinning]
Sidney Falco: It’s a new wrinkle, to tell the truth… I never thought I’d make a killing on some guy’s “integrity.”

Sidney Falco: Watch me run a 50-yard dash with my legs cut off!

Sally: But Sidney, you make a living. Where do you want to get?
Sidney Falco: Way up high, Sam, where it’s always balmy. Where no one snaps his fingers and says, “Hey, Shrimp, rack the balls!” Or, “Hey, mouse, mouse, go out and buy me a pack of butts.” I don’t want tips from the kitty. I’m in the big game with the big players. My experience I can give you in a nutshell, and I didn’t dream it in a dream, either – dog eat dog. In brief, from now on, the best of everything is good enough for me.

Steve: The next time you want information, don’t scratch for it like a dog, ask for it like a man!

Sidney Falco: He thinks J.J.’s some kind of a monster…
Susan Hunsecker: Don’t you?
Sidney Falco: Susie, J.J. happens to be one of my very best friends!
Susan Hunsecker: I know. But someday I’d like to look into your clever little mind and see what you really think of him.
Sidney Falco: Where do you come off, making a remark like that?
Susan Hunsecker: Who could love a man who makes you jump through burning hoops like a trained poodle?

Jimmy Weldon: It’s a dirty job, but I pay clean money for it.

J.J. Hunsecker: You’re dead, son. Get yourself buried.

J.J. Hunsecker: Everybody knows Manny Davis – except Mrs. Manny Davis.

J.J. Hunsecker: President? My big toe would make a better President!

Sidney Falco: If I’m gonna go out on a limb for you, you gotta know what’s involved!
J.J. Hunsecker: My right hand hasn’t seen my left hand in thirty years.

Rita: What am I, a bowl of fruit? A tangerine that peels in a minute?

Rita: Here’s mud in your column!

J.J. Hunsecker: I love this dirty town.

Steve: Mr. Hunsecker, you’ve got more twists than a barrel of pretzels!

J.J. Hunsecker: Son, I don’t relish shooting a mosquito with an elephant gun, so why don’t you just shuffle along?

Sidney Falco: Maybe I left my sense of humor in my other suit.

Steve: That’s fish four days old. I won’t buy it!

Sidney Falco: The cat’s in a bag and the bag’s in a rive

J.J. Hunsecker: I’d hate to take a bite outta you. You’re a cookie full of arsenic

J.J. Hunsecker: Well son, it looks like we have to call this game on account of darkness.

J.J. Hunsecker: Don’t remove the gangplank, Sidney – you may wanna get back onboard.

Rita: It was Palm Springs. Two years ago. Don’t tell Sidney.

Sidney Falco: Sure, the columnists can’t do without us, except our good and great friend J.J. forgets to mention that. You see, we furnish him with items.
J.J. Hunsecker: What, some cheap, gruesome gags?
Sidney Falco: You print ’em, don’t ya?
J.J. Hunsecker: Yes, with your clients’ names attached. That’s the only reason the poor slobs pay you – to see their names in my column all over the world. Now, I make it out, you’re doing *me* a favor?… The day I can’t get along without a press agents’ handouts, I’ll close up shop and move to Alaska, lock, stock, and barrel.

Sidney Falco: Every dog will have his day.

Sidney Falco: Don’t do anything I wouldn’t do! That gives you a lot of leeway…

Mary: You’re an amusing boy, but you haven’t got a drop of respect for anything in human life.

Sidney Falco: A press agent eats a columnist’s dirt and is expected to call it manna.

Leo Bartha: [to Sidney, of J.J] Tell him that like yourself, he’s got the scruples of a guinea pig and the morals of a gangster.

Loretta Bartha: What you do now, Mr. Falco, is crow like a hen. You have just laid an egg.

Otis Elwell: I can’t think of a good reason why I should print anything you give me. I can’t even think of a *bad* reason.
Sidney Falco: [eyeing a pin-up] Suppose I introduce you to a… a lovely reason… who’s both good *and* bad… and available?
Otis Elwell: [pauses] I’m not an unreasonable man.

Mary: If it’s true, J.J.’s gonna hit the ceiling.
Sidney Falco: Can it be news to you that J.J.’s ceiling needs a new plaster job every six weeks?

Steve: [to Hunsecker, of his flunky] Tell me sir, when he dies, do you think he’ll go to the dog and cat heaven

J.J. Hunsecker: Sidney, this syrup you’re giving out with… you pour over waffles, not J.J. Hunsecker.

Sidney Falco: [to Susan] Start thinking with your head instead of your hips.
[pause]
Sidney Falco: Uh – by the way, I got nothing against women thinking with their hips. That’s their nature. Just like it’s a *man’s* nature to go out and hustle and get the things he wants.

J.J. Hunsecker: Look, Manny, you rode in here on the Senator’s shirt tails, so shut your mouth!
Sen. Harvey Walker: Now, come, J.J., that’s a little too harsh. Anyone seems fair game for you tonight.
J.J. Hunsecker: This man is not for you, Harvey, and you shouldn’t be seen with him in public. Because that’s another part of a press agent’s life – he digs up scandal among prominent men and shovels it thin among columnists who give him space.
Sen. Harvey Walker: There is some allusion here that escapes me…
J.J. Hunsecker: We’re friends, Harvey – we go as far back as when you were a fresh kid Congressman, don’t we?
Sen. Harvey Walker: Why does everything you say sound like a threat?
J.J. Hunsecker: Maybe it’s a mannerism – because I don’t threaten friends, Harvey. But why furnish your enemies with ammunition? You’re a family man. Someday, with God willing, you may wanna be President. Now here you are, Harvey, out in the open where any hep person knows that this one…
[points at Manny Davis]
J.J. Hunsecker: [points at Linda James] … is toting THAT one…
J.J. Hunsecker: [points at Senator] around for you.

J.J. Hunsecker: Manny, what exactly are the UNSEEN gifts of this lovely young thing that you manage?
Manny Davis: Well, she sings a little… you know, sings…
Linda James: Manny’s faith in me is simply awe-inspiring, Mr. Hunsecker. Actually, I’m still studying, but…
J.J. Hunsecker: What subject?
Linda James: Singing, of course… straight concert and…
J.J. Hunsecker: [glance flicks between the Girl and the Senator] Why “of course”? It might, for instance, be politics…
Linda James: Me? I mean “I”? Are you kidding, Mr. Hunsecker? With my Jersey City brains?
J.J. Hunsecker: The brains may be Jersey City, but the clothes are Traina-Norell.

Sidney Falco: Do you believe in capital punishment, Senator?
Sen. Harvey Walker: [amused] Why?
Sidney Falco: [pointing to the phone] A man has just been sentenced to death.

J.J. Hunsecker: Harvey, I often wish I were dead and wore a hearing aid. With a simple flick of a switch, I could shut out the greedy murmur of little men.

Rita: [to Sidney] Don’t you get messages, Eyelashes? I called you twice.

Sidney Falco: Kill me, push me through a window somewhere! I walked into this hallowed ground without knocking!

J.J. Hunsecker: Sidney, conjugate me a verb. For instance, “to promise.”

J.J. Hunsecker: How do you spell Picasso, the French painter?
[Taps out three letters on his manual typewriter upon hearing Sidney’s response]
J.J. Hunsecker: It’s an item – I hear he goes out with three-eyed girls.

J.J. Hunsecker: Here’s your head; what’s your hurry?

Sidney Falco: I am tasting my favorite new perfume – success!

J.J. Hunsecker: Yes, Sidney. You sound happy, Sidney. Why should you be happy when I’m not? How do you spell Picasso, the painter? One S or two?
Sidney Falco: Two.

Sally: Where do you want to get?
Sidney Falco: Way up high, Sal, where the air is balmy.

Sidney Falco: You’re walking around blind, Frank, without a cane.

J.J. Hunsecker: Now don’t kid a kidder.

Susan Hunsecker: Who could love a man who makes you jump into hoops like a trained poodle?

J.J. Hunsecker: I like Harry, but I can’t deny he sweats a little.

Sidney Falco: Dallas, your mouth is as big as a basket and twice as empty!

Sidney Falco: If you’re funny, Walter, I’m a pretzel! Drop dead!

Mary: [Sidney Falco is at her desk] Have you seen this? Otis Elwell’s column today?
Mary: [Falco feigns disinterest; Mary reads the piece from Elwell’s gossip column aloud] “The dreamy marijuana smoke of a lad who had the high-brow jazz quintet, is giving an inelegant odor to that elegant East Side club where he works. That’s no way for a card-holding Party member to act. Moscow won’t like it, you naughty boy.”