Spaces in Migration – Film Screening and Book Launch 14.10.2013

From Limit Experience:

14 October, 6pm Onwards. Cinema, RHB, Goldsmiths

An evening of film screenings, discussion examining the experiences of Tunisian migrants during and after the Arab Spring of 2011. The event which includes a drinks reception will celebrate the launch of Spaces in Migration: Postcards of a Revolution edited by Glenda Garelli, Federica Sossi and Martina Tazzioli (Pavement Books, 2013).

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Two films looking at life in the refugee camp at Choucha located on the Tunisian-Libyan border will be screened:

The first, a short made by the editors of Spaces in Migration during their visit to the camp in 2013. This will be followed by a brief discussion and introduction to the book which features interviews with those living in the camp alongside critical, philosophical reflections on the implications of various migrations and responses of European border control agencies which occurred in the wake of the Tunisian revolution together with the war in Libya. There will also be a skype link-up with Tunisian activists.

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Babylon (Exit Productions, 2012) won the top prize at the FIDMarseille festival in 2012. Directed by ismaël, Youssef Chebbi, Ala Eddine Slim, the film eschews subtitles, pushing viewers to focus their attention on the cacophony of languages and sounds encountered in the camp together with the visual, physical forms of communication which accompany and supplement oral communication.

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Attendance is free. All Welcome.

14 October 2013, 6pm.

The Cinema (small hall), Richard Hoggart Building, Goldsmiths,

University of London.

Copies of Spaces in Migration: Postcards of a Revolution will be on sale at the discount price of £10 (list price £15.99).

supervision’s last tape (possibly should have been first bit of advice)

I guess the only other things to think about are the last minute alternate readings of the thesis scenario, where you anticipate possible objections by trying to guess what someone may ask in a viva – so, what is the key idea that is left out? is there a theoretical frame or metaphor or allegory that demands to be noticed that you might have ignored? Is there a theorist whose work would be really useful for this that probably should be used to bookend the whole thing? Would something else in cultural studies, say the concept of hegemony, gift, ideology, critique, symbolic, affect, ontology or memory, recast anything you are doing (just asking – none of these terms actually grabs me in any way that I think you need to deal with). Second set of doubts – is there an idea that could usefully recast the core thesis – ie, is the border usefully thought of as spectral (pace Derrida)? [i think not]. Is it about paranoia? [maybe]. Is it impacted by time? Modernity? Individualism? What do you think of the difference between critiques of racism/white supremacy and critiques of national chauvinism? Does this matter for border studies? Is there a border studies if the border is non-geographic? Does it make sense to talk of border at all?

echoes of this, this and this [should of course take my own advice, but it’s never easy to see in your own writing]

Docklands Cinema Club with CCS sun 26.5.2013

The Three Burials of Melquiades Estrada (2005)
Sun 26 May, 2-4pm (15)
Winner of the Best Actor and Best Screenplay awards at Cannes 2005, Tommy Lee Jones’ directorial debut follows the story of Pete Perkins,
a ranch foreman in the high desert of west Texas who undertakes a dangerous and quixotic journey into Mexico.

© BBC Film Council / The Kobal Collection

Venue Museum of London Docklands see here.

Docklands Cinema Club – first screening 24.2.13

Watch a great film every month screened in our Grade I listed Georgian warehouse. Enjoy drinks, popcorn and film introductions by leading writers, directors, critics and fans.

CCS Border Film Series

With the Museum of London Docklands based at the site of a former port, where better to explore the divisive issue of the policing of national borders. With introductions and panel discussions by independent film makers, leading academics and activists.
All screenings are FREE

© Blindside Productions

Border Shorts
Sun 24 Feb, 2-4pm (15)
The border film series opens with four shorts by two highly acclaimed directors. Ursula Biemann’s Performing the Border (1999) and Europlex (2003) explore the borders of Mexico, Europe and Africa, whilst Tim Travers Hawkins’ 1000 Voices (2009) features answerphone messages from people held in a detention center in the UK, and Surpriseville (2010) reveals the daily lives of a gated community in Arizona.

© Smoking Dogs Films / The Kobal Collection

The Nine Muses (2010)
Sun 17 Mar, 2-4pm (PG)
Part documentary, part personal essay, this experimental film by John Akomfrah offers an existentialist rumination on the experience of migration to post-war Britain.

© BBC Film Council / The Kobal Collection

Ghosts (2006)
Sun 21 Apr, 2-4pm (15)
Based on the true story of the Morcambe Bay cockle-picking disaster of 2004, Nick Broomfield’s film follows Chinese undocumented immigrant Ai Qin to reveal the dangerous exploitation of migrant labour in the UK.

© Europa Corpsony / The Kobal Collection

The Three Burials of Melquiades Estrada (2005)
Sun 26 May, 2-4pm (15)
Winner of the Best Actor and Best Screenplay awards at Cannes 2005, Tommy Lee Jones’ directorial debut follows the story of Pete Perkins,
a ranch foreman in the high desert of west Texas who undertakes a dangerous and quixotic journey into Mexico.

© BBC Film Council / The Kobal Collection

In This World (2002)
Sun 23 Jun, 2-4pm (15)
This semi-fictional docu-drama follows the attempted escape of two Afghan refugees along the ‘silk road’ through Pakistan, Iran and Turkey towards London. Directed by Michael Winterbottom.

© Key Creatives / The Kobal Collection

District 9 (2009)
Sun 21 Jul, 2-4pm (15)
The Academy Award nominated sci-fi thriller set in a militarized refugee camp in Johannesburg, South Africa, drawing on real life events from the apartheid era.

 

 

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