BCI – business university links

Possibly of interest apropos discussions about internships and corporate involvement with Universities, this BCI report was just released. I won’t say much about the content, but there are interesting bits on the employer spokesperson’s view of internships and students working with Rolls Royce etc. I will however note in passing the beginning and end images of stylised ‘talk bubbles’. The BCI is the ‘voice of business’, but by the time the conversation bubble – talk metaphor – gets to section five of the report the détente is silenced and the WAR metaphor takes over. And at the end, the CEO from Glaxo Smith Kline – Andrew Witty – considers the university an integral part of his ‘supply chain’. No response from the other side of the conversation – the final talk bubble is empty, left speechless in the face of a militant enthusiasm. Rhetorical friendly fire shooting off its mouth again.

Screen Shot 2015-01-27 at 18.10.05

Screen Shot 2015-01-27 at 18.31.28 Screen Shot 2015-01-27 at 18.34.53the report is available here if you must.

Plan C: Institute for Precarious Consciousness – ‘we are all very anxious’

trinketization

I don’t think the state of things is readily reducible to bite-sized explanation-metaphors, nor that whole eras of the capitalist mode of production (this is of course not just a metaphor) should be understood under sweepingly simple code-words, but, unfolding better explanations by deploying such code-words as efforts to get us to think differently and in detail is of great use. And the corresponding tactical 1,2,3-step is also helpful, even if ’tis not the whole struggle – so having Plan C post this is very welcome, even for those times when I am neither miserable, bored, nor anxious (‘he’s behind you’ – the pantomime reflex).

Not anxious, but I am amazed, often variously amazed – even at the idea of posting this:

“Today’s public secret is that everyone is anxious. Anxiety has spread from its previous localised locations (such as sexuality) to the whole of the social field. All forms…

View original post 104 more words

the tropes challenge

Choose a genre (music, film, horror, sci fi), discipline (anthropology, sociology, management, psychiatry) or a favourite author (who has written a lot, Bataille, Burroughs, Spivak, Toer) and find at least one example of each of the following tropes (below):

not a complete list….

Rhetorical Figures


-A-

abating
abbaser
abecedarian
abcisio
ablatio
abode, figure of
abominatio
abuse
abusio
abusion
acoloutha
accismus
accumulatio
accusatio adversa
accusatio
acervatio
acrostic
acyrologia
acyron
adage
adagium
addubitatio
adhortatio
adianoeta
adjectio
adjournment
adjudicatio
adjunct
adjunctio
admonitio
adnexio
adnominatio
adynata
adynaton
aeschrologia
aetiologia
affirmatio
affirmation
aganactesis
agnominatio
agnomination
aischrologia
allegory
alleotheta
alliteration
amara irrisio
ambage, figure of
ambiguitas
ambiguous
amphibologia
ampliatio
anacephalaeosis
anacoenosis
anacoloutha
anacoluthon
anadiplosis
anamnesis
anangeon
anaphora
anapodoton
anastrophe
anemographia
anesis
antanaclasis
antanagoge
antenantiosis
anthimeria
anthropopatheia
anthypophora
anticategoria
anticipation
antilogy
antimetabole
antimetathesis
antipersonification
antiphrasis
antiprosopopoeia
antiptosis
antirrhesis
antisagoge
antistasis
antisthecon
antistrophe
antithesis
antitheton
antonomasia
apagoresis
aphaeresis
aphorismus
apocarteresis
apocope
apodioxis
apodixis
apologue
apophasis
apoplanesis
aporia
aposiopesis
apostrophe
apothegm
apparent refusal
appositio
apposition
ara
articulus
aschematismus
aschematiston
asphalia
assonance
assumptio
assumption
avancer, the
asteismus
astrothesia
asyndeton
auxesis
aversio
-B-
barbarism
battologia
bdelygmia
benedictio
bomphiologia
brachiepia
brachylogia
broad floute, the
-C-
-D-
-E-
ecphonesis
ecphrasis
ecthlipsis
effictio
elenchus
ellipsis
emphasis
enallage
enantiosis
enargia
encomium
energia
enigma
ennoia
enthymeme
enumeratio
epanalepsis
epanodos
epanorthosis
epenthesis
epergesis
epexegesis
epicrisis
epilogus
epimone
epiphonema
epiplexis
epistrophe
epitasis
epitheton
episynaloephe
epitrochasmus
epitrope
epizeugma
epizeuxis
erotema
ethopoeia
eucharistia
euche
eulogia
euphemismus
eustathia
eutrepismus
example
excitatio
exclamatio
excursus
exergasia
exouthenismos
expeditio
expolitio
exuscitatio
-F-
frequentatio
-G-
geographia
gnome
graecismus
-H-
-I-
icon
indignatio
inopinaturm
insinuatio
interrogatio
inter se pugnantia
intimation
irony
isocolon
-L-
-M-
macrologia
martyria
maxim
medela
meiosis
membrum
mempsis
merismus
mesarchia
mesodiplosis
mesozeugma
metabasis
metalepsis
metallage
metaphor
metaplasm
metastasis
metathesis
metonymy
mimesis
mycterismus
-N-

noema
-O-
oeonismus
ominatio
onedismus
onomatopoeia
optatio
orcos
oxymoron
-P-
-R-
ratiocinatio
repetitio
repotia
restrictio
rhetorical question
-S-
sarcasmus
scesis onomaton
schematismus
scheme
scurra
skotison
sententia
sermocinatio
simile
solecismus
soraismus
sorites
subjectio
sustentatio
syllepsis
syllogismus
symperasma
symploce
synaeresis
synaloepha
synathroesmus
syncatabasis
syncategorema
synchoresis
synchysis
syncope
syncrisis
synecdoche
synoeciosis
synonymia
synthesis
syntheton
synzeugma
systole
systrophe
-T-
tapinosis
tasis
tautologia
taxis
thaumasmus
tmesis
topographia
topothesia
traductio
transitio
transplacement
tricolon
-V-
-Z-
zeugma

Bad etymologies and other disturbances

I had noticed that the initials of “I Am Charlie” are an anagram of CIA, and yes, you can be a patsie and guilty, and for sure the death squads are tools of wider interests, but this is too hit and miss not to be disturbing. Which bits count as evidence, which speculation? Classified between zionist assets and conspiracy theory, these four items make it into the Pantomime Terror file. Thanks to DE, AW, SC and MB for them drawing my attention.

http://www.presstv.ir/Detail/2015/01/10/392443/CIA-carried-out-Paris-attack-Roberts

http://www.veteranstoday.com/2015/01/08/charlie-hebdo-viral/

http://www.telesurtv.net/english/news/Assange-on-Charlie-Hebdo-A-Conspicuous-Failure-20150110-0016.html

http://youtu.be/c8FNH2OrtUc

Dobbers.

What would happen if a university, or an individual staff member, declined to take part in Prevent or refused to refer students showing specified personality traits to local authority panels? Kennedy pushed Brokenshire repeatedly on this and eventually got her answer: a charge of contempt of court and, perhaps, prison.

Really? Really?! Really.

THES. Article originally published as: Teacher, tutor, soldier, spy: towards a police state of mind (8 January 2015)

The counter-terrorism bill will co-opt academics into the ‘securocrat’ and chill debate on campus – it must be fought, says Martin Hall

Imagine this. You’re teaching a course on current affairs and decide to have your class debate the merits and demerits of fracking. The debate is passionate and gets out of hand, with students on both sides getting personal. You calm them down, and the session ends. But you’ve noticed that one student, a passionate environmentalist, is sullen and withdrawn, not engaging with others, and obviously anxious. You are under a standing instruction from your dean to report all such symptoms to the faculty administrator. Next week, the student is absent. You learn that, based on your report, she is now under the supervision of your university’s local authority, with a support plan to help correct her radical tendencies.

Now consider this. The Counter-Terrorism and Security Bill 2014-15 being considered by Parliament proposes that all university governing bodies have a statutory duty to implement measures that prevent radicalisation that could lead to acts of terrorism. In addition to barring radical advocates from speaking on campuses, the new law will require every local authority to set up a panel to which the police can refer “identified individuals” who are considered to be vulnerable to radicalisation. All universities are identified as “partners” with their local authorities in this process of referral.

The government’s focus is, of course, on the acute threat posed by the conflicts in Syria, Iraq, Pakistan and Afghanistan. But one of the objectives of extreme and unpredictable violence is to create a syndrome of responses that, in themselves, promote ever more violent reactions. Will this new act achieve its immediate aim of preventing Islamic radicalisation? Or will these new statutory duties of referral push those who are singled out down a path that they may otherwise have rejected? The new law is not directed at Muslims alone, but at anyone with radical views, including views that are non-violent but that might open up a road to violence. Could these new statutory obligations on universities be used against opponents of fracking, or animal rights activists, or anti-nuclear movements, or any radical opposition to the status quo? And where would that leave the principles of academic freedom and freedom of speech in universities, and elsewhere?

Here is Baroness Kennedy of The Shaws’ summation of one of the key issues, in her questioning of James Brokenshire, the minister for security and immigration, on 3 December: “The nature of the university is to develop the mind. It is about the whole business of freedom of speech. Freedom of exchange of ideas is at the heart of the university. By challenging orthodoxies, people grow in ideas. Inevitably, some of those ideas will be bad ones, but the best way to deal with them is in debate and by challenging them in the process of learning. No university has created a fundamentalist who has gone to Syria to take part in what is going on there. Yes, people may have been influenced, probably more by other students. That can happen in a cafe in Birmingham as much as in any university. You are introducing a chilling effect on the whole thing that universities are about, which you and I benefited from, as did most people who went to university – and 40 per cent of our young now go to university. You are doing this when we know that universities up and down the land are already considering these issues and thinking about how they might deal with them and how they might create the debate, without having a statutory duty to do so. That is what concerns people: the statutory duty with a power to give directions from the state. The state will be able to tell universities what they ought to do, and they will be punished in some way if they do not fulfil the requirement set by the state and government…I want you to explain to us why it needs to be a statutory duty.”

Universities, then, already work extensively with the police in the context of the existing Home Office policy for countering radicalisation, known as “Prevent”. The new law will make Prevent a statutory responsibility rather than a voluntary programme.

But there is a significant counterargument: that Prevent, in itself, angers and radicalises students. This is because of the implication that, simply by virtue of holding Islamic beliefs, a person is more likely to become a terrorist. The same assumption is not made about, say, Catholics. Given that the 2011 census recorded 2.7 million Muslims living in the UK and that the Home Office is currently concerned about 500 individuals, there is a question of effectiveness and proportionality for the Prevent strategy as it is, let alone for the draconian expansion of powers contemplated for the new act.

The draft legislation also proposes processes of referral for students considered at risk of succumbing to radicalisation. Universities will be required to train all staff who have contact with students to recognise what Brokenshire called being “withdrawn and reserved, and perhaps showing other personality traits”. Where these traits are identified, the university must refer the student to a panel set up by the police and the local authority. This panel will oversee and administer a safeguarding programme, which may include referral to the health services.

This aspect of the bill has alarmed Sir Peter Fahy, chief constable of the Greater Manchester Police and the national lead for Prevent. “If these issues [defining extremism] are left to securocrats then there is a danger of a drift to a police state,” he told a national newspaper last month. “I am a securocrat; it’s people like me, in the security services, people with a narrow responsibility for counter-terrorism. It is better for that to be defined by wider society and not securocrats. There is a danger of us being turned into a thought police. This securocrat says we do not want to be in the space of policing thought or police defining what is extremism.”

Both the bill and the current government consultation make it clear that these measures will also apply to “non-violent extremism, which can create an atmosphere conducive to terrorism and can popularise views which terrorists exploit”. This means that the statutory responsibilities to be introduced in the act could be used by the police and local authorities in circumstances such as those recently faced by Canterbury Christ Church University, which was asked for a list of those attending a debate about and discussion of fracking.

What would happen if a university, or an individual staff member, declined to take part in Prevent or refused to refer students showing specified personality traits to local authority panels? Kennedy pushed Brokenshire repeatedly on this and eventually got her answer: a charge of contempt of court and, perhaps, prison.

The bill was due to have its third reading in Parliament this week and is open for public consultation until 30 January. It raises issues that must be taken seriously.

Times Higher Education free 30-day trial

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Article originally published as: Teacher, tutor, soldier, spy: towards a police state of mind (8 January 2015)

AUTHOR:
Martin Hall was vice-chancellor of the University of Salford from 2009 to 2014.

Museum of Innocence on smoking

For curio’s sake – and for its [mild] critique of anthropology – there is this short chapter from Orhan Pamuk’s ‘Museum of Innocence’. You only need to know that the ‘author’ of the text has been deliriously in love with Fusan for years. What is impressive however is the way empirical evidence gets into the novel, a documentation of this obsession. It is even possible to visit the museum and see the butts lovingly displayed.

IMG_1488 IMG_1489 IMG_1490