Category Archives: film

Docklands Cinema Club – first screening 24.2.13

Watch a great film every month screened in our Grade I listed Georgian warehouse. Enjoy drinks, popcorn and film introductions by leading writers, directors, critics and fans.

CCS Border Film Series

With the Museum of London Docklands based at the site of a former port, where better to explore the divisive issue of the policing of national borders. With introductions and panel discussions by independent film makers, leading academics and activists.
All screenings are FREE

© Blindside Productions

Border Shorts
Sun 24 Feb, 2-4pm (15)
The border film series opens with four shorts by two highly acclaimed directors. Ursula Biemann’s Performing the Border (1999) and Europlex (2003) explore the borders of Mexico, Europe and Africa, whilst Tim Travers Hawkins’ 1000 Voices (2009) features answerphone messages from people held in a detention center in the UK, and Surpriseville (2010) reveals the daily lives of a gated community in Arizona.

© Smoking Dogs Films / The Kobal Collection

The Nine Muses (2010)
Sun 17 Mar, 2-4pm (PG)
Part documentary, part personal essay, this experimental film by John Akomfrah offers an existentialist rumination on the experience of migration to post-war Britain.

© BBC Film Council / The Kobal Collection

Ghosts (2006)
Sun 21 Apr, 2-4pm (15)
Based on the true story of the Morcambe Bay cockle-picking disaster of 2004, Nick Broomfield’s film follows Chinese undocumented immigrant Ai Qin to reveal the dangerous exploitation of migrant labour in the UK.

© Europa Corpsony / The Kobal Collection

The Three Burials of Melquiades Estrada (2005)
Sun 26 May, 2-4pm (15)
Winner of the Best Actor and Best Screenplay awards at Cannes 2005, Tommy Lee Jones’ directorial debut follows the story of Pete Perkins,
a ranch foreman in the high desert of west Texas who undertakes a dangerous and quixotic journey into Mexico.

© BBC Film Council / The Kobal Collection

In This World (2002)
Sun 23 Jun, 2-4pm (15)
This semi-fictional docu-drama follows the attempted escape of two Afghan refugees along the ‘silk road’ through Pakistan, Iran and Turkey towards London. Directed by Michael Winterbottom.

© Key Creatives / The Kobal Collection

District 9 (2009)
Sun 21 Jul, 2-4pm (15)
The Academy Award nominated sci-fi thriller set in a militarized refugee camp in Johannesburg, South Africa, drawing on real life events from the apartheid era.

 

 

Museum of London Docklands
West India Quay
Canary Wharf
London E14 4AL

The Museum entrance is two minutes walk from West India Quay.
See Museum of London Docklands on a map

DLR icon By DLR: West India Quay
Tube icon By Tube: Canary Wharf
Bus icon By Bus: D3, D7, D8, 277, N50, D6, 15, 115, 135
DLR icon By River: Thames Clippers
10-15 minute journey on a Thames Clipper riverboat from Bankside or Maritime Greenwich Pier to Canary Wharf Pier. Call 0870 781 5049 for times and prices.

 

More than a friend. 22.2.13. 6pm

poster3Screening of queer South Asian film as part of LGBT History Month at Goldsmiths.

LGBTQ Society & Centre for Cultural Studies, Goldsmiths, University of London, invite you to a screening of More Than A Friend… a film that explores the public perception of same-sex relationships in India through the story of Rupsa and Ranja – two women in love, living together in contemporary Calcutta. Directed by Debalina and produced by Sappho for Equality (an LBT organisation based in Calcutta, India), it weaves in real-life interviews into the narrative, swiftly moving between the real and the reel.

The screening will be followed by a discussion with one of the producers.


Event Information

Location: Cinema, Richard Hoggart Building
Cost: Free, all welcome
Website: Trailer
Department: Centre For Cultural Studies
Time: 22 February 2013, 18:00 – 21:00

Border Films and Discussion once a month on sundays at Museum of London Docklands (free) from 24.2.2013

Screen shot 2013-01-21 at 15.09.07

24 Feb: Short Film Nite – four short films about the border
A screening of the films Performing The Border (1999) and Europlex (2003) by Ursula Biemann. In these two short films, Biemann tracks the activities that enact the border. In the first, we see the feminisation of the border in Ciudad Juarez, Mexico and in the second the repeated crossings that link Europe and Africa. Also a screening and discussion with filmmaker Tim Travers Hawkins, creator of 1000 Voices (2009) an animated film featuring answer phone messages from people held in a detention centre in the UK, and Surpriseville (2010) a documentary about the gated community residents of Surprise, Arizona and their attempts to make themselves as safe as possible.
 
17 March: The Nine Muses - John Akomfrah – 2010 
Akomfrah offers an existentialist rumination on the experience of migration to post-war Britain in this docu-essay that intertwines archival images and original footage shot in Alaska; accompanied by voice-over readings of texts by Shakespeare, Beckett, Milton and Nietzsche, and music by Schubert, Wagner and Arvo Part.
 
21 April: Ghosts - Nick Broomfield – 2006
Based on the true story of the Morcambe Bay cockle-picking disaster of 2004, this film follows Chinese undocumented immigrant Ai Qin to Europe and reveals the dangerous exploitation of migrant labour in the UK.
 
26 May: The Three Burials of Melquiades Estrada – Tommy Lee Jones – 2005
Tommy Lee Jones’ directorial debut is a story of friendship, vengence, and one man’s commitment to fulfill a promise for his friend that sees him crossing the Rio Grande pursued by police and Border Patrol.
 
23 June: In This World – Michael Winterbottom – 2002
Using small handheld digital video cameras and non-professional actors, this semi-fictional docu-drama tracks two asylum seekers on their journey from a refugee camp in Peshawar to the UK, following the “silk road” through Pakistan, Iran and Turkey towards London.
 
21 July: District 9 – Neill Blomkamp – 2009
A camp in Johannesburg, South Africa is the setting of this science fiction body-horror drama in which an alien population of refugees is faced with eviction from the militarized ghetto where they are confined and exploited.
(with thanks to Rachel Palmer, Leila Whitley, and Maria Jose Pantoja who will, (variously/sometimes vicariously), be in discussion with John Hutnyk after the screenings).

Russian Fairytale at Doc House. (riverside 31 jan 2013)

Screen shot 2013-01-16 at 11.08.11

I am Fiction 17 Jan 2013 (London Art Fair)

Film Programme 2
Thursday 17th January only

7pm: Premier as part of Thursday Late – Max Kestner & Thomas Altheimer, ‘I am Fiction’ (2012), 82 minutes. Courtesy of Alma Enterprises (part of A.L.I.S.N., stand P29)

Reality, art performance or publicity stunt? Few people could make head or tails of the lawsuit that Thomas Altheimer (aka Thomas Skade-Rasmussen Strøbech) raised against fellow artist Claus Beck-Nielsen (aka Das Beckwerk) and the Gyldendal publishing house in 2009 for publishing the novel The Sovereign, which described Altheimer’s private life in meticulous detail.

But on the initiative of the director Max Kestner, Altheimer started to film himself during the two-year trial that followed. Amidst a vortex of confrontations, dashes to America, changing lawyers and empty vodka bottles, there is no doubt in Altheimer’s mind that he has been robbed of his identity…

http://www.londonartfair.co.uk/page.cfm/Link=6/t=m/goSection=28

 

Cotton For My Shroud – screening with the directors, 6pm 16.1.2013

 

CANCELLED, or rather DIFFERENT FILM!

- news from the directors is that the people organising the premiere (due 19th Jan) have unfortunately balked at our screening, and instead we will have Nandan and Kavita present a curated selection of short films from the International Poetry Festival that they toured with in India – more details soon, same time, same place.

Cotton-2

Screening with the filmmakers Nandan Saxena & Kavita Bahl – 6pm Lauri Grove Baths, Council Room, Centre for Cultural Studies, Goldsmiths

As Multinational Corporations that produced poisons for biological warfare during the cold war positioned their deadly wares as agricultural inputs, the last few decades have seen humans waging war upon themselves.

Vidarbha, in the Indian state of Maharashtra, has become a bloody battleground in this ongoing global war between corporate greed and the people’s ‘Right to life’.

‘Cotton for my shroud’ investigates how Monsanto manipulated Bt Cotton field trials, enticed farmers with lies about yields and reduction in pesticide use. Empty promises, escalating costs, dwindling yields and depressed cotton prices played havoc.

Since 1995, a quarter of a million Indian farmers have committed suicide – the largest wave of recorded suicides in human history.

Most of them were cotton farmers from Vidarbha.

While the state and the media label these deaths as suicide, the cotton fields of Vidarbha remain a mute witness to genocide.

Narrated in the first person, the film gives us a window into the drama and despair that forms the warp and weft of life at Vidarbha.

Screening  6pm Lauri Grove Baths, Council Room, Centre for Cultural Studies, Goldsmiths. All wellcome

Two Augusts and Several Monuments

Screen shot 2012-12-01 at 11.27.04Abstract for Lisbon keynote – On the Life and Afterlife of the Popular 4.12.12

Two Augusts and Several Monuments

To evaluate the popular, and its returns, I will contrast two Augusts of recent English summers. In 2011 there were three nights of youth rioting, which might otherwise be called a popular uprising that was both an expression of anger at austerity, and not without links to the student protests of 2010 and the various events in the wake of Tunisia and Tahrir Square that pass under the name of Arab Spring. Whether in Tahrir Square or in London these popular uprisings were met with significant and unpopular police violence. In the subsequent period, across the Arab world, and in London in August 2012, the policing of the popular has taken divergent paths. In August 2012 London’s major security effort was the operation to protect the Olympic Games, universally recognised as a success (despite problems with G4 and much carping before the opening ceremony). In Libya, Syria, and arguably Egypt, a less popular mode of policing, indeed a counter-revolutionary war, has been the order of the day.

I cannot make a full assessment of the Arab Spring in this talk, but note it as a context for a possible angular appreciation of what the Olympic Games achieved for London. To make a point about the politics of popular festivals I will do a Vasco De Gama (viewed from the tower built for Expo 98) and take three examples from outside Europe, intentionally looking elsewhere for perspective, and finding it in carnival (Mela) films from India. With a historical perspective drawn from Indian film theorists like Madav Prasad and Arvind Rajagopal a possible critical perspective on the austerity cycle of power and performance, bread and circuses becomes more clear. The Ferris Wheel of the Chicago World Fair, the Eiffel Tower and the London Eye will be associated images.

Marx Reloaded Film, with the director 20.11.12

Co-sponsored by the Centre for Cultural Studies:

Inline images 1

///Film Screening: Tuesday 20th November, 7pm 
MARX RELOADED.
Director Jason Barker will be present for the discussion.
Ian Gulland Lecture Theatre
Goldsmiths College, New Cross, London Borough of Lewisham, London SE14, UK
Entrance is Free

Marx Reloaded is a 2011 German documentary film written and directed by the British writer and theorist Jason Barker. Featuring interviews with several well-known philosophers, the film aims to examine the relevance of Karl Marx’s ideas in relation to the global economic and financial crisis of 2008–09. A Q&A with the director will follow.

MILANGE BABEY RATAN DE MELE TE (LET’S MEET AT BABA RATAN’S FAIR) – film and director talk 14.11.12

MILANGE BABEY RATAN DE MELE TE (LET’S MEET AT BABA RATAN’S FAIR)

Followed by discussion with the director Ajay Bhardwaj and Dr Virinder S Kalra
Time: 5pm, Wednesday 14th November 2012
Venue: The Cinema, Richard Hoggart Building, Goldsmiths
This film explores the idea of Punjabiyat, in ways seen and unseen, in the way it continues to inhabit the universe of the average Punjabi’s everyday life, language, culture, memories and consciousness. This is the universe that this film stumbles upon in the countryside of East Punjab, in India. Following the patters of lived life, it moves fluidly and eclectically across time, mapping organic cultural continuities at the local levels. It is a universe, which reaffirms the fact that cultures cannot be erased so very easily. It is where the love of Heer and Ranjah rather than the divisions of the priestly class are celebrated. This is a universe marked by a rich tradition of cultural co-existence and exchange, where the boundaries between the apparently monolithic religious identities of ‘Hindu’, ‘Muslim’ and ‘Sikh’ are blurred and subverted in the most imaginative ways.“Bhardwaj’s film further attests to the great pull the soil exercises over the people who were once rooted in it but had been forced to leave, “ Ishitaq Ahmed, Professor Emeritus of Political Science, Stockholm University.
http://www.facebook.com/l.php?u=http%3A%2F%2Fajaybhardwaj.in%2F&h=rAQHjgrF0&s=1

I am Fiction

For those in Denmark – get to CPH:DOX for I am Fiction (click image to be transported to the CPH:DOX page):

 

Amit Rai’s Untimely Bollywood, Duke UP 2009

20121003-101309.jpg

“GOD IS NOT DEAD!” 8.10.2012 Goldsmiths NAB LG02 Film and Q and A with the director and others

“GOD IS NOT DEAD!”

EUROPEAN/WORLD PREMIERE – Monday 8 October 2012 6:30

GOLDSMITHS, UNIVERSITY OF LONDON, CENTRE FOR CULTURAL STUDIES

THE FILM

Directed by young Turkish filmmaker Bahar Kılıç, “GOD IS NOT DEAD!” is a journey that cuts across the realms of music, politics and intercultural dialogue.

Shot in London, Berlin, Frankfurt and Istanbul, the documentary investigates European Muslims’ resistance against the epidemic of “Islamophobia” and their endeavour to transform the demonized visage of Islam in the West through music, creative expression, political activism and redefining the concept of “hybridity”.

The incredibly diverse stances, creative practices and routes of thinking displayed by the people in focus of “GOD IS NOT DEAD!” demonstrate a wealth that is unknown not only to the Western world who is prone to be infected by the virus of cultural exclusivist discourses but also to the Orient who’s suffering from amnesia.

“GOD IS NOT DEAD!” features exclusive interviews with and footage from Fun^Da^Mental and Aki Nawaz, The Kominas, Poetic Pilgrimage, Mecca2Medina, Mohammed Yahya, Nomadic Poet (The Planets), Quest Rah, Style Islam (Melih and Yeliz Kesmen), Sayfoudin (Germany) and Professor John Hutnyk (Goldsmiths, University of London).

THE EVENT

The European & World premiere of GOD IS NOT DEAD! will take place on October 8th, at Goldsmiths, University of London Centre for Cultural Studies.

The screening will be followed by a Q&A Session with the director, the creative staff and featured names.
The event is FREE OF CHARGE.

All free thinkers and “rebels with noble causes” are welcome to join us. New Academic Building LG02

(Goldsmiths NAB LG02 – that’s the big newish building on the hill behind the back field. Walk through the main building and up the path, and up the stairs beside the gym. In the door, and downstairs to the big auditorium. NAB LG02 New Academic Building LG02. See you there.)

http://www.gold.ac.uk/calendar/?id=5707

Gian Maria Volonté screening series Autumn 2012 – Centre for Cultural Studies


The Centre for Cultural Studies at Goldsmiths presents, as part of their ongoing weekly Monday Film Night, a series of movies focused on the relatively unknown Italian actor/screenwriter Gian Maria Volonté: the bad guy in A Fistful of Dollars and For A Few Dollars More, under the pseudonym of Johnny Wels (later declaring he really did them for the money, to pay off debts for a theatre piece on the relation between the Pope and the Nazi regime); who refused star roles in Coppola’s The Godfather and Bertolucci’s 1900, so as to take part in exiled director Miguel Lettin’s Actas de Marusia on the massacre of Chilean miners; a member and once-candidate of the Italian Communist Party, later excluded for helping autonomist Oreste Scalzone to escape from Italy; whose interpretations can never be disassociated from fervent socio-political commitment, cultural and literary comment, confrontations with directors, and an attitude of defiance towards a culture in which an actor must merely perform a pre-written script. The first screening, to take place on 15th October 2012, will be of “Investigation of a Citizen Above Suspicion (1970), by Elio Petri.

.

all films at 7pm

.

15 OCTOBER // “Investigation of a Citizen Above Suspicion” (original: “Indagine su un cittadino al di sopra di ogni sospetto), 1970, E. Petri

22 OCTOBER // “Sacco and Vanzetti”(original: “Sacco e Vanzetti”), 1971, G. Montaldo

29 OCTOBER // “The Working Class Goes To Heaven” (original: “La classe operaia va in paradiso”), 1971, E. Petri

5 NOVEMBER // “Slap the Monster on Page One” (original: “Sbatti il mostro in prima pagina”), 1972, by M. Bellocchio

12 NOVEMBER // No film – go to this instead http://hutnyk.wordpress.com/2012/09/06/federici-12-11-12/

19 NOVEMBER // “The Moro Affair” (original: “Il caso Moro”), 1986, G. Ferrara

26 NOVEMBER // “The Mattei Affair” (original: “Il caso Mattei”), 1972, F. Rosi

3 DECEMBER // “Lucky Luciano”, 1973, F. Rosi

10 DECEMBER // “Christ Stopped at Eboli” (original: “Cristo si e’ fermato a Eboli”), 1979, F. Rosi

.

Anyone is welcome to turn up and bring others. All films will be screened in the Council Room, second floor of Laurie Grove Baths on Laurie Grove, and will be followed by post-screening discussion. For more info on the CCS Monday Film Night, please email: k.molin[at]gold.ac.uk and check: http://ccsfilmnight.wordpress.com/

Mela

Who is going to this? Link here.

(and for fun, below, some Mela filmi style – 4 versions. How tragic the last one may be?)

Nargis/Dilip Kumar 1948

 Mumtaz, Feroze Khan 1971

Aamir Khan, Twinkle Khanna 2000

 

(aaaah – Salma Hayek, Mathew Perry – actually, this is just the Italian rebranding of 2011 for a 1997 movie called Fools Rush In – in Italian Mela means apple. Go figure)

Professor X polemic

Just found this in the 2010/1 issue of Third Text on Cinema in the Muslim World. Worth a second look:

 

I believe the text is free to download/read online, via this link here. Thanks for the shout out credit Ali Nobil Ahmad, gonna read the rest of the issue asap.

Deptford & New Cross Virtual Social Centre. Film Night. Housing. 17.5.2012 7.30PM

Hi,
Just a reminder about tomorrow’s film night:
Subject: New Social Centre / Film night starts May17th at NX Library

Deptford & New Cross Virtual Social Centre present
Films to change the world with: Housing

Films about ordinary people’s direct solutions to housing crises –  from
rent strikes to squatting

@ New Cross People’s Library Thurs 17th May 7.30

283 New Cross Road SE14 nearest station New Cross Gate on London
overground from Dalston Junction etc and train from London Bridge

please publicise through all relevant channels!

Thanks

NXRB – “In Time”, film review by Sophie Fuggle

Marx at the Movies 16.3.2012

Marx at the Movies Conference, March 16-17, 2012

University of Central Lancashire

See the extensive Conference programme here.

in partnership with

Lancashire International Film Festival @LIFEPreston2012

and sponsored by

The Contemporary Arts Development Group (CADG) and the Research Fund of the School of Journalism, Media and Communication (JOMEC)

Friday 16 March: Mitchell & Kenyon Theatre

9.00 am: Coffee and Registration
9.30 am: Welcome

Peter James Anderson, Director of Research (JOMEC)

Ewa Mazierska, Anandi Ramamurthy and Lars Kristensen (UCLan)

10.00-11.00 am: Keynote

Citizens: On Marx and Kane 
John Hutnyk (Goldsmiths College, UCL)

11.00-11.10 am: Coffee break

11.10-1.10 pm: Breakaway session (Rooms TBA)

 

see here for the rest of the programme

Newspeak – Ken Fero

Watch Newspeak: http://vimeo.com/34527445

Newspeak (25minutes/2011/Ken Fero/Migrant Media)

Truth is the first casualty of war and ‘Newspeak’ explores just how media is currently controlled in the UK through power structures like Ofcom. Using poetry and experimental visual techniques the film is a personal journey with filmmaker Ken Fero reflecting on how the radical content of certain images – deaths in police custody, Occupy London the invasion of Iraq, workers uprisings – remain hidden from UK audiences.

The film uses strong political statements to expose the forces seeking to censor the media. The challenging style of ‘Newspeak’ offers a visual essay that unites the mothers of those killed by the British police with the Palestinian children who were victims of Operation Cast Lead, exposes the bloodlust for oil that lead to British interference in Iran and shows how, in all these areas, there is always resistance, always survivors always a memory.

A Migrant media Production for News Anew.

Watch Newspeak: http://vimeo.com/34527445

Some Like it Hot

Screening monday 23 Jan 2012 7:15pm Laurie Grove Council Room Goldsmith Centre for Cultural Studies.

 

Other monday films here.

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