Category Archives: border

Forensis: The Architecture of Public Truth.

An impressive fat volume from the Centre for Research Architecture. Available here

20140625-232051-84051242.jpg

Counter-Mapping Universities

Good to see Ex-Zeppelin and new Hamburg students take up the QM Counter Map:

From the QM collective interview:

What has been the reception to this project, as best you can tell. Have there been unexpected or unintended responses? Has it inspired kindred projects/mobilizations?
The reception has been good, and quite diverse. Some people like the map, some the game, and people stress different aspects of both. In general people really appreciate the fact that it looks very different from most activist and political material. A staff member at Queen Mary in the International Student Admissions Office asked for copies to help her explain to her British colleagues the issues faced by many international students. A presentation to a group of professors highlighted how little our own lecturers knew about the difficulties faced by their own international students.

The game has worked very well as a tool that forces people to discuss their own and others’ experiences of education and border crossings. We specifically designed it as a relational device to get the players to share their experiences and frustrations, and to imagine alternatives. The colourfulness and playfulness of the map has brightened up many a grey bureaucratic political meeting, and inspired others to invent similar tools of mapping, acting and organising in relation to other institutions. We’ve had requests for people to use our InDesign files for making their own maps (the ‘code’ of the map is open and free), and given workshops to other groups making their own maps of the university.

Meeting tomorrow morning (22nd) near Hamburg hafen:

During this meeting we will be focusing on counter mapping using a map project that John Hutnyk presented to us developed by Queen Mary University PhD students a couple of years ago. He has recommended us the following ‘literature’, which we would kindly ask you to prepare for Sunday in case you are interested in taking part.

1) http://lateral.culturalstudiesassociation.org/issue1/content/countermapping.html

2) http://classwaru.org/2012/06/24/mapping-shared-imaginaries-for-anti-capitalist-movements-an-interview-with-tim-stallman-of-the-counter-cartographies-collective/

3) http://www.countercartographies.org/downloads/?dl_cat=2

Afterwards we are planning a small walk through the Hamburg Hafen with the focus on ‘contested spaces’ in order to link the breakfast session with Hamburg.

Billboard wars UK.

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Border residue

Spaces of Migration, just published by Pavement Books returns me to the suggestion on this blog some time ago, and no doubt elsewhere, that the discussion of borders has a too easy conception of space. Borders can be aural, temporal, conceptual, and proliferating right here. Where? He-re.

The policy pronouncements of the border authority replicates authoritarianism across the body politic. The compliance of some with G4s or other privatised border tools makes border agents of us all.

Abject humanity subjected to austerity and its justifications, proliferation of pollutants met only with fake environmentalist concern, the persistence, and indeed global extension of workplace ‘alienation’ viewed as nostalgia, deskilling/desktop killing for everyone, not just the ruling class – all this seems to generalise a lumpen character.

Maintain the reserve army and keep us all in fatigues seems the only strategy capital has in this crisis. Besides scrambling for a cut of course, and a crazy generous cut at that. Snouts in the trough, but keeping us all in the sty. Some are more in the mud than others, some are bacon, most are fed on swill – oink oink. The uniformed ones collaborate with the omnipresent butcher. Some are tagged with an RFID chip on their ear. Higgledy po.

grenzlinien/borderlines book out and Frankfurt Book Fair (this is a big deal)

>>>>>>>>>
dear readers,
I am happy to announce that the publication of the “grenzlinien/borderlines” project will be released soon.
Even though on a short notice, I would be happy to see you in the heart of frankfurt.
The book (although mainly in German) is available via bookshops and via the publisher: www.gutleut-verlag.com
Next Exhibition/Presentation 14.11.13 – 15.01.14 in Giessen.
Further Info: www.grenzlinien.com
Yours,
Raul Gschrey
frankfurt book fair | open books 2013
grenzlinien: von grenzen, grenzüberschreitungen und migration/// border lines: on borders, border crossings and migration

In over 40 artistic, documentary and academic contributions the book deals with the topic of borders, border lines and migration. The book, edited by Christine Taxer and Raul Gschrey, will be presented for the first time together with guests, among others Judith Kopp (Pro-Asyl).

Book presentation and reading | Thursday, 10.10.2013 | 20.00 h
Heussenstamm-Galerie | Braubachstraße 34 | 60311 Frankfurt/Main

buchmesse | open books 2013
grenzlinien | von grenzen, grenzüberschreitungen und migration

In über 40 künstlerischen, dokumentarischen und wissenschaftlichen Beiträgen setzt sich das Buch mit dem Themenbereich Grenzen, Grenzlinien und Migration auseinander, das von Christine Taxer und Raul Gschrey herausgegeben wurde und die zusammen mit ausgewählten Gästen – u.a. Judith Kopp von Pro Asyl – das Buch an diesem Abend zum ersten Mal vorstellen werden.

Buchvorstellung und Lesung | Donnerstag, 10.10.2013 | 20.00 Uhr
Heussenstamm-Galerie | Braubachstraße 34 | 60311 Frankfurt/Main

 

grenzlinien. von grenzen, grenzüberschreitungen und migration
Christine Taxer und Raul Gschrey (Hg.)
reihe mono | stereo | Band 5

Grenzen, Grenzüberschreitungen und Migration – diesem Themenbereich nähert sich die Publikation in über 40 Beiträgen verschiedenster Formen und Perspektiven. Versammelt sind literarische und politische, kultur- und politikwissenschaftliche Texte, Interviews, Reportagen und Berichte über künstlerische und wissenschaftliche Projekte. Gleichberechtigt daneben stehen dokumentarische und freie künstlerische Arbeiten: Collagen, Fotografien, Filme, Performances, Installationen und Videospiele, die in der begleitenden Ausstellungsreihe präsentiert und im Buch dokumentiert werden. Auf diese Weise liegt eine weit angelegte Auseinandersetzung vor, die sich durch die Verbindung der Felder Kunst, Wissenschaft und Politik von anderen, inhaltlich ähnlich ausgerichteten Projekten abhebt.

Der Ausgangspunkt der Beiträge ist das geografische Verständnis von »Grenze« als der Einfassung  eines Territoriums, die einen geografischen Bereich ausweist und einen staatlichen Machtanspruch zeigt. Diese Grenzlinie kann überschritten werden, aber nur unter bestimmten Bedingungen. Auf diese Weise sind Grenzen Ordnungen des Raumes, die Gegensätze produzieren: zwischen innen und außen, eigen und fremd, Einschluss und Ausschluss. Grenzlinien treten damit als manifeste Strukturen auf, ebenso jedoch als soziale Konstruktionen.

Zum einen analysieren und visualisieren die grenzlinien-Beiträge die Grenzen der Europäischen Union. Mit dem Schengen-Prozess mobil geworden, sind sie nicht mehr nur an den Rändern anzutreffen, sondern sowohl innerhalb als auch außerhalb des europäischen Territoriums: Wie beeinflussen sie die Realität der EU-Bürger, wie die der irregulären Migranten? Über den engeren geografischen Sinn hinausgehend, werden im Buch zum anderen die mit dem Ziehen von Grenzen verbundenen politischen, sozialen und kulturellen Prozesse thematisiert: Welche Gemeinsamkeiten und Unterschiede werden definiert? Dabei gehen die Beiträge auch dem produktiven Potential von Grenzen und Grenzüberschreitungen nach, das etwa die Konstruktion von Identitäten und Wahrnehmungsweisen bewirkt.

Mit Beiträgen von:

Ximena Aburto Felis : Winfried Baumann : Melanie Gärtner : gold extra : Raul Gschrey : Özlem Günyol : Marie-Hélène Gutberlet : Maike Häusling : Tom Holert : John Hutnyk : Dietmar Kammerer : Bernd Kasparek : Thomas Kilpper : Anna Knappe : Judith kopp : Karl Kopp : Mustafa Kunt : Chus Lopez Vidal : Bounama Magassa : Luise Marbach : Bernd Metz : Pekka Niskanen : Wolf Perina : Timo Piikkilä : Lisl Ponger : Jaana Ristola : Marcus Roloff : Heiko Schäfer : Ursula Schmidt : Jula-Kim Sieber : Katrin Ströbel : Christine Taxer : Mark Terkessidis : Michael Wagener : Norbert Wagener : Alex Wolf : Marc Wrasse

www.grenzlinien.com

192 Seiten, zahlr. Abb., br., 24 x 17 cm, dt., Euro 25,00
ISBN 978-3-936826-58-6
Erscheint: 1. Oktober 2013 | © gutleut verlag 2013
Erhältlich im Buchhandel und über www.gutleut-verlag.com

———————-

Talk in Giessen, Germany 21.11.2013 18:00-20:00

Screen shot 2013-10-03 at 23.54.44

 

Note: The same day as this

Spaces in Migration – Film Screening and Book Launch 14.10.2013

From Limit Experience:

14 October, 6pm Onwards. Cinema, RHB, Goldsmiths

An evening of film screenings, discussion examining the experiences of Tunisian migrants during and after the Arab Spring of 2011. The event which includes a drinks reception will celebrate the launch of Spaces in Migration: Postcards of a Revolution edited by Glenda Garelli, Federica Sossi and Martina Tazzioli (Pavement Books, 2013).

image

Two films looking at life in the refugee camp at Choucha located on the Tunisian-Libyan border will be screened:

The first, a short made by the editors of Spaces in Migration during their visit to the camp in 2013. This will be followed by a brief discussion and introduction to the book which features interviews with those living in the camp alongside critical, philosophical reflections on the implications of various migrations and responses of European border control agencies which occurred in the wake of the Tunisian revolution together with the war in Libya. There will also be a skype link-up with Tunisian activists.

image

Babylon (Exit Productions, 2012) won the top prize at the FIDMarseille festival in 2012. Directed by ismaël, Youssef Chebbi, Ala Eddine Slim, the film eschews subtitles, pushing viewers to focus their attention on the cacophony of languages and sounds encountered in the camp together with the visual, physical forms of communication which accompany and supplement oral communication.

image

Attendance is free. All Welcome.

14 October 2013, 6pm.

The Cinema (small hall), Richard Hoggart Building, Goldsmiths,

University of London.

Copies of Spaces in Migration: Postcards of a Revolution will be on sale at the discount price of £10 (list price £15.99).

supervision’s last tape (possibly should have been first bit of advice)

I guess the only other things to think about are the last minute alternate readings of the thesis scenario, where you anticipate possible objections by trying to guess what someone may ask in a viva – so, what is the key idea that is left out? is there a theoretical frame or metaphor or allegory that demands to be noticed that you might have ignored? Is there a theorist whose work would be really useful for this that probably should be used to bookend the whole thing? Would something else in cultural studies, say the concept of hegemony, gift, ideology, critique, symbolic, affect, ontology or memory, recast anything you are doing (just asking – none of these terms actually grabs me in any way that I think you need to deal with). Second set of doubts – is there an idea that could usefully recast the core thesis – ie, is the border usefully thought of as spectral (pace Derrida)? [i think not]. Is it about paranoia? [maybe]. Is it impacted by time? Modernity? Individualism? What do you think of the difference between critiques of racism/white supremacy and critiques of national chauvinism? Does this matter for border studies? Is there a border studies if the border is non-geographic? Does it make sense to talk of border at all?

echoes of this, this and this [should of course take my own advice, but it's never easy to see in your own writing]

Sonic Border talk notes 2008

notes on the global sweatbox (2008 talk in Malmo)

SB1

sb2 sb3 sb4 sb5 sb6 sb117 sb118 sb119 sb1191 SB1192 sb1193 SB1195

SB1196

SB1197SB1198

SB1199

(ha! REF that if you can employers. Sadly, this never got typed up nor even given over to the mice to gnaw on)

Docklands Cinema Club with CCS sun 26.5.2013

The Three Burials of Melquiades Estrada (2005)
Sun 26 May, 2-4pm (15)
Winner of the Best Actor and Best Screenplay awards at Cannes 2005, Tommy Lee Jones’ directorial debut follows the story of Pete Perkins,
a ranch foreman in the high desert of west Texas who undertakes a dangerous and quixotic journey into Mexico.

© BBC Film Council / The Kobal Collection

Venue Museum of London Docklands see here.

The Malignancy – newspaper piece for The Citizen Artist News (below the fold on page 1).

Screen shot 2013-05-01 at 23.01.06

 

CitizenArtistNews3

Education at the Border – Edu Commission #2 #border #education

Here, the good oil… click image to download the report

Screen shot 2013-04-25 at 11.02.38

Education_at_the_Border_Report2

Docklands Cinema Club – first screening 24.2.13

Watch a great film every month screened in our Grade I listed Georgian warehouse. Enjoy drinks, popcorn and film introductions by leading writers, directors, critics and fans.

CCS Border Film Series

With the Museum of London Docklands based at the site of a former port, where better to explore the divisive issue of the policing of national borders. With introductions and panel discussions by independent film makers, leading academics and activists.
All screenings are FREE

© Blindside Productions

Border Shorts
Sun 24 Feb, 2-4pm (15)
The border film series opens with four shorts by two highly acclaimed directors. Ursula Biemann’s Performing the Border (1999) and Europlex (2003) explore the borders of Mexico, Europe and Africa, whilst Tim Travers Hawkins’ 1000 Voices (2009) features answerphone messages from people held in a detention center in the UK, and Surpriseville (2010) reveals the daily lives of a gated community in Arizona.

© Smoking Dogs Films / The Kobal Collection

The Nine Muses (2010)
Sun 17 Mar, 2-4pm (PG)
Part documentary, part personal essay, this experimental film by John Akomfrah offers an existentialist rumination on the experience of migration to post-war Britain.

© BBC Film Council / The Kobal Collection

Ghosts (2006)
Sun 21 Apr, 2-4pm (15)
Based on the true story of the Morcambe Bay cockle-picking disaster of 2004, Nick Broomfield’s film follows Chinese undocumented immigrant Ai Qin to reveal the dangerous exploitation of migrant labour in the UK.

© Europa Corpsony / The Kobal Collection

The Three Burials of Melquiades Estrada (2005)
Sun 26 May, 2-4pm (15)
Winner of the Best Actor and Best Screenplay awards at Cannes 2005, Tommy Lee Jones’ directorial debut follows the story of Pete Perkins,
a ranch foreman in the high desert of west Texas who undertakes a dangerous and quixotic journey into Mexico.

© BBC Film Council / The Kobal Collection

In This World (2002)
Sun 23 Jun, 2-4pm (15)
This semi-fictional docu-drama follows the attempted escape of two Afghan refugees along the ‘silk road’ through Pakistan, Iran and Turkey towards London. Directed by Michael Winterbottom.

© Key Creatives / The Kobal Collection

District 9 (2009)
Sun 21 Jul, 2-4pm (15)
The Academy Award nominated sci-fi thriller set in a militarized refugee camp in Johannesburg, South Africa, drawing on real life events from the apartheid era.

 

 

Museum of London Docklands
West India Quay
Canary Wharf
London E14 4AL

The Museum entrance is two minutes walk from West India Quay.
See Museum of London Docklands on a map

DLR icon By DLR: West India Quay
Tube icon By Tube: Canary Wharf
Bus icon By Bus: D3, D7, D8, 277, N50, D6, 15, 115, 135
DLR icon By River: Thames Clippers
10-15 minute journey on a Thames Clipper riverboat from Bankside or Maritime Greenwich Pier to Canary Wharf Pier. Call 0870 781 5049 for times and prices.

 

Border Films and Discussion once a month on sundays at Museum of London Docklands (free) from 24.2.2013

Screen shot 2013-01-21 at 15.09.07

24 Feb: Short Film Nite - four short films about the border
A screening of the films Performing The Border (1999) and Europlex (2003) by Ursula Biemann. In these two short films, Biemann tracks the activities that enact the border. In the first, we see the feminisation of the border in Ciudad Juarez, Mexico and in the second the repeated crossings that link Europe and Africa. Also a screening and discussion with filmmaker Tim Travers Hawkins, creator of 1000 Voices (2009) an animated film featuring answer phone messages from people held in a detention centre in the UK, and Surpriseville (2010) a documentary about the gated community residents of Surprise, Arizona and their attempts to make themselves as safe as possible.
 
17 March: The Nine Muses - John Akomfrah – 2010 
Akomfrah offers an existentialist rumination on the experience of migration to post-war Britain in this docu-essay that intertwines archival images and original footage shot in Alaska; accompanied by voice-over readings of texts by Shakespeare, Beckett, Milton and Nietzsche, and music by Schubert, Wagner and Arvo Part.
 
21 April: Ghosts - Nick Broomfield – 2006
Based on the true story of the Morcambe Bay cockle-picking disaster of 2004, this film follows Chinese undocumented immigrant Ai Qin to Europe and reveals the dangerous exploitation of migrant labour in the UK.
 
26 May: The Three Burials of Melquiades Estrada – Tommy Lee Jones – 2005
Tommy Lee Jones’ directorial debut is a story of friendship, vengence, and one man’s commitment to fulfill a promise for his friend that sees him crossing the Rio Grande pursued by police and Border Patrol.
 
23 June: In This World - Michael Winterbottom – 2002
Using small handheld digital video cameras and non-professional actors, this semi-fictional docu-drama tracks two asylum seekers on their journey from a refugee camp in Peshawar to the UK, following the “silk road” through Pakistan, Iran and Turkey towards London.
 
21 July: District 9 – Neill Blomkamp – 2009
A camp in Johannesburg, South Africa is the setting of this science fiction body-horror drama in which an alien population of refugees is faced with eviction from the militarized ghetto where they are confined and exploited.
(with thanks to Rachel Palmer, Leila Whitley, and Maria Jose Pantoja who will, (variously/sometimes vicariously), be in discussion with John Hutnyk after the screenings).

Rachel Rye Convergence

A great abstract for an upcoming must see talk by Rachel (jan 2013, goldsmiths – stay tuned), posted (with permission) because it sums up some of the best that CCS does. The sort of thing that also was described here.

In February 2012 No Borders London, along with students and academics, held a week-long Convergence at Goldsmiths. The aim was to share knowledge and experiences relating to trans-national migrant and activist struggles against the border regime. Numerous discussions by activists, academics, migrants rights groups and organisations took place, direct actions occurred simultaneously at various sites away from the Convergence, films were screened, stories were told, food was cooked, childcare was provided, plans were made, friendships and alliances were formed, debates, disagreements and grievances were aired. My proposal is to present for discussion some reflections on what happened when No Borders converged within the academic space of the university. These reflections are based on my own close involvement as an organiser throughout both the planning stages and the actual week of events. I will consider the event in relation to previous border camps to highlight both the advantages and disadvantages of staging such a meeting at a university campus.

The 2012 No Borders Convergence offered a valuable opportunity to examine the challenges of bringing scholars and militant activists together within the institutional space of the university. As an event, the Convergence attempted and – to some extent – succeeded in creating a productive clash of activist struggles with critical academic scholarly research. In my presentation I will argue that a one-off event is not enough to bridge divides across research and activist practice and that the challenge now is to discuss how, when and where to stage the next Convergence-style event. How might it be possible to bring scholars, activists, migrants, humanitarian and charity workers together into productive connection again? Should such events be a priority in other institutions where researchers are working on the issue of migration and migrant activism? Is there really such a divide between the militant activist and the academic, or are many in No Borders in fact more closely connected to academic research than it might first appear? What does it mean to assume the ‘activist identity’ and how can this role be usefully problematised?

Rachel Rye

PhD student, Centre for Cultural Studies, Goldsmiths

Snitching about…

was sent this by the folk at V.I.S.A. (Victorious International Student Army):

 

Stop the Snitching: What We Mean By Non-compliance

 

The pastoral idyll is dead. It was bulldozed long ago only to be overlain with a grid of barbed wire. If it ever had any real existence, it is now best described as a border fence, an internment camp, an interrogation room at the dock or airport. What we mean by this, is that the argument that attendance records – from lectures, classes, tutorials – need to be kept for pastoral reasons is now untenable. It needs to be jettisoned, however much nostalgia or regret we may feel in doing so. It is no longer safe or strategic to record attendance, for whatever reason, now that the border crosses us in our places of work and learning.

 

If the border is a social relation and not a thing, then we must pay attention to the ways in which we are reproducing, enabling and enforcing that border in our day-to-day lives. The most obvious way we might do this is, of course, the demand that teaching staff act as border agents by forwarding attendance records to the UKBA. Three missing strikes and you’re a terrorist. Goldsmiths UCU were quick to adopt a position of non-compliance, and has re-affirmed this stance in a recent statement. We need to be clear, however, about exactly what we mean by non-compliance, and alert to those who might be in a weaker position, from which non-compliance becomes more difficult to uphold.

 

Regarding the latter, two groups immediately spring to mind: administrative staff, and international students themselves. Admin staff are easier for management to single out, scapegoat, and threaten with punitive measures. Even a well-meaning attendance record kept for pastoral purposes can become a border snitch if intercepted once in administrative hands. Alternatively, lying on attendance registers makes teaching staff liable. To co-opt a reasonably repugnant, and thankfully now redundant, phrase from the US military, the best policy with regard to non-compliance is: don’t ask, don’t tell. If the data is never recorded, it can’t be passed on. Simple.

 

Management will, however, undoubtedly try to fulfill the UKBA’s demands whilst at the same time seeking to sidestep hostilities from staff and students. ‘Light touch’ is management-speak for this covert-cavity-search-on-campus approach. If they are unable to get the information they need from teaching or admin staff, rest assured they will exploit the vulnerabilities inherent in the precarious status of international students directly. We need to make it clear – strikes, occupations, public refusal – that any requirement or request that demands international students act as their own border agent, or assumes them to be criminal or terrorist until proven otherwise, is in blatant contradiction of our position of non-compliance. We need to make sure our non-compliance doesn’t leak. Stop the snitching – solidarity across the board and the border.

 

Love and rage,

 

Goldsmiths Migration Solidarity

The Education Commission. :: a militant inquiry into privatisation and immigration controls in education ::

Students, lecturers, admin workers and anybody else interested in education are invited to join a new group aiming to research and take action around the current conditions in the education sector.  In the wake of the UK Border Agency’s revocation of London Met’s Highly Trusted Sponsor Status and consequent plans to deport potentially thousands of international students along with further plans for privatisation across the sector, we propose to investigate and take action around the changing nature of the education in the UK since the abolition of the EMA and mass increase of university tuition fees in 2010. We aim to draw together student, parent, and education workers’ experiences as well as available data in order to produce and disseminate as accurate a picture as possible of the current state and trends in higher education in the UK.  We do so in support of and solidarity with current and future struggles in education. Our next meeting is on Wednesday 26th September at 6.30pm at London Met Holloway Road campus (the tower building next to Holloway Road tube station). Here is a link:http://www.londonmet.ac.uk/about/buildings/tower-building.cfm

Anybody interested in participating should contact: contact.edu.comm[at]gmail.com. This project has been initiated by Plan C London, it is however open to individuals and groups to get involved.

More UKBA crap

This is despicable:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-19650640

‘There is drug-taking here’ – UKBA round-up of Punjabis in Hounslow

Well well, profiled as welfare scrounger drug addict illegal Indian layabouts. The sensitive and thoughtful UKBA (DisUnited kingdom border agency) again doing its utmost to reveal the seamier side of enforced poverty in the so-called welfare state. ‘We are all in this together’ – so detain and deport. Its pogrom-bait. I don’t recall, say, Alex from Blur, getting done for drug-use (‘cheese’ is just a metaphor) and of course am so enamored by the even-handed approach to other students, like the Internationals at the MET. Clearly this item is a teaser to set another theme for the PROTEST AGAINST THE UKBA on friday.

Rest of the story from the BBC with video here.

PROTEST AGAINST THE UKBA on friday.

London Met Demo Friday 28 Sept 2012

From London Met UCU:

London Met – Defend Our Students – London Demonstration Friday 28/9

Dear all,

London Met UCU, London Met Unison, and London Met SU have called a London-wide mobilisation and march from ULU (Malet Street) to the Home Office (Marsham Street, Victoria) for Friday 28th Sept. Assembling at Malet Street for 1pm. Under the banner: ‘Amnesty Now – Save London Met – No to Privatisation’. This initiative is supported by London Region UCU, and University of London Union (ULU).

This Friday (21/9) the High Court will consider granting an immediate injunction (an effective ‘stay’) in favour of London Met Uni and against the UK Border Agency (UKBA). Such an injunction should allow for a full Judicial Review of the UKBA’s decision to revoke London Met’s Highly Trusted Sponsor (HTS) Tier-4 licence – an action that has condemned over 2,500 of our students to either forced university transfer or deportation.

However, even if an injunction is granted it will only be a temporary reprieve until the outcome of the Judicial Review itself – which is expected to take at least several months to be heard. Meanwhile, our license to recruit international students is still suspended, our current international students are still in limbo – particularly if they have more than this academic year to complete, and our courses/jobs still threatened.

If an injunction is not granted then we will be in the fight of our lives – not only for all our international students against an immediate and very real deportation threat but for the very survival of London Met as a public university.

We are refusing to sit on the sidelines and by mere observers of our destiny as others shape it. We are therefore fighting as hard as we can for our students, our university, and for real justice. We will have much more chance of winning that fight with your support and solidarity – as wonderfully expressed during last Friday’s UK-wide solidarity events.

Last week’s TUC Congress in Brighton unanimously supported the call for an immediate amnesty for our students

We now need your support once more – particularly, if you are based in London. We want as many trade union banners as possible on next week’s march/demonstration – along with as many colleagues as you can bring. This is not just a fight for London Met – this is a fight for public education as a whole.

Please send messages of support to mark.campbell_home [at] btopenworld.com

In solidarity

Mark Campbell
London Metropolitan University UCU (Chair)
UCU National Executive Committee (London and the East HE)
SERTUC Public Services Committee (Vice-Chair)

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