Category Archives: ✪ what’s on

The Rumour of Calcutta

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Book Depository discounts on Hutnyk books

(some cheaper, some mad costly – dm me for deals)

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In the Name of the People

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The Royal African Society invites you to the launch of

In the Name of the People

Remembering Angola’s Forgotten Massacre: 27 May 1977 |Tuesday 20 May 2014, 7-8PM
Speakers: Lara Pawson, author; Ngola Nvunji, UK-based Angolan journalist and community activist; Keith Sommerville, lecturer, University of Kent. Chair: Mary Harper, Africa Editor, BBC.

On 27th May 1977, a small demonstration against the MPLA, the ruling party of Angola, led to the slaughter of thousands of people. These dreadful reprisals are little talked of in Angola today – and virtually unknown outside the country. In The Name of The People, journalist Lara Pawson’s new book, tracks down the story of what really happened in the aftermath of that fateful day. In a series of vivid encounters, she talks to eyewitnesses, victims and even perpetrators of the violent and confusing events of the 27th May and the following weeks and months. From London to Lisbon to Luanda, she meets those who continue to live in the shadow of the appalling events of 40 years ago and who – in most cases – have been too afraid to speak about them before. As well as shedding light on the events of 1977, the book contributes to a deeper understanding of modern Angola – its people and its politics. Join author Lara Pawson and a panel of experts to discuss the book and Angola’s past, present and future.

Date & Time: Tuesday 20 May 2014, 7-8PM

Venue: Brunei Suite, SOAS, WC1H 0XG

Register by clicking HERE

Film Screening and Bar Night

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from 7pm Friday 25th April

entry by donation, free popcorn and cheap drinks
hosted by Plan C London – all welcome
followed by a bar night and tunes

Finally Got the News (1970)
Produced in Association with the League of Revolutionary Black Workers
dir. Stewart Bird, Rene Lichtman, Peter Gessner, US, video, 55 min.

Finally Got the News is a forceful documentary that reveals the activities of the League of Revolutionary Black Workers inside and outside the auto factories of Detroit. Through interviews with the members of the movement, footage shot in the auto plants, and footage of leafleting and picketing actions, the film documents their efforts to build an independent black labor organisation that, unlike the UAW, will respond to worker’s problems, such as the assembly line speed-up and inadequate wages faced by both black and white workers in the industry.

Irene Fernandez

Tribute to Irene Fernandez

Press Statement
31 March 2014

Reference: Ms. Sarojeni Rengam, Executive Director, Pesticide Action Network Asia and the Pacific

Dr. Irene Fernandez (1946-2014):
A life full of meaning, dedicated to the people’s struggle

PENANG, Malaysia – The Pesticide Action Network Asia and the Pacific (PAN AP) is deeply saddened with the passing away of beloved and respected activist Dr. Irene Fernandez today.

“We grieve with Irene’s family, friends and comrades in the people’s struggle. Without a doubt, she will be a big loss not only to the movement in Malaysia but to the global movement that is striving for a just and better world for the poor and oppressed,” said Ms. Sarojeni Rengam, Executive Director of the Penang-based regional advocacy group.

Fernandez had been hospitalized for a week after suffering a massive heart attack. Days before that, Fernandez was still able to attend the annual Steering Council meeting of PAN AP, where she served as Chairperson. Fernandez was instrumental in setting up PAN AP as an independent regional network. She would have turned 68 years old on 18 April.

“But while we are grieving and hurt, let us also celebrate the life of Irene. A life that had been without a doubt full of meaning, a life that had been selflessly dedicated to the people’s aspiration to end injustice and oppression,” Rengam said.

“PAN AP will be forever grateful to Irene for her untiring guidance. With the help of her leadership and invaluable advice, we have been able to faithfully fulfill our commitment to serve the interests of small food producers, defend their rights, and advance their welfare. Words could not describe how much PAN AP will miss her and her insights that had firmly stood for the small farmers, agricultural workers, migrants, women, indigenous peoples and other marginalized sectors,” Rengam added.

Fernandez was a well-known human rights advocate and Director and co-founder of the Kuala Lumpur-based non-government group Tenaganita, which promotes the rights of migrant workers and other oppressed and poor people in Malaysia.

Fernandez was a teacher turned social activist, a commitment she resolutely held for almost four decades.

Aside from serving as the Executive Director of Tenaganita and Chairperson of PAN AP’s Steering Council, Fernandez was also a member of the respective Steering Committees of the Asian Rural Women’s Coalition (ARWC), the Coalition of Agricultural Workers International (CAWI), Asian Peasant Coalition (APC), and the People’s Coalition on Food Sovereignty (PCFS). She was also the Director of CARAM-Asia and the Vice Chairperson of the International Migrant Alliance (IMA).

In addition, Fernandez was among the founders of the Asia Pacific Forum on Women, Law and Development (APWLD) and a former executive member of the Committee on Asian Women, aside from helping establish various women and human rights organizations in Malaysia.

Fernandez had received numerous awards from various prestigious institutions in recognition of her work to stop violence against women and the abuses against migrant and poor workers including the Human Rights Watch Award in 1996; the Amnesty International Award in 1998; the International PEN Award in 2000; the Jonathan Mann Award in 2004; and the Right to Livelihood Award in 2005. She was also a recipient of an Honorary Doctorate in Social Medicine from the Vrije University in Amsterdam.

Because of her work, Fernandez herself had been a victim of the Malaysian government’s persecution. She went through a 13-year trial for writing a report that exposed the horrific conditions in immigration detention centers in Malaysia. She was convicted to a one-year imprisonment in 2003 but was released on bail, and appealed the decision to the High Court that eventually dropped the charges against her in 2008. ###

_________________________________________

Press Statement
31 March 2014

Reference: Ms. Sarojeni Rengam, Executive Director, Pesticide Action Network Asia and the Pacific (PAN AP)
E-mail: sarojeni.rengam@panap.net

Dr. Irene Fernandez (1946-2014):
A life full of meaning, dedicated to the people’s struggle

PENANG, Malaysia – The Pesticide Action Network Asia and the Pacific (PAN AP) is deeply saddened with the passing away of beloved and respected activist Dr. Irene Fernandez today.

“We grieve with Irene’s family, friends and comrades in the people’s struggle. Without a doubt, she will be a big loss not only to the movement in Malaysia but to the global movement that is striving for a just and better world for the poor and oppressed,” said Ms. Sarojeni Rengam, Executive Director of the Penang-based regional advocacy group.

Fernandez had been hospitalized for a week after suffering a massive heart attack. Days before that, Fernandez was still able to attend the annual Steering Council meeting of PAN AP, where she served as Chairperson. Fernandez was instrumental in setting up PAN AP as an independent regional network. She would have turned 68 years old on 18 April.

“But while we are grieving and hurt, let us also celebrate the life of Irene. A life that had been without a doubt full of meaning, a life that had been selflessly dedicated to the people’s aspiration to end injustice and oppression,” Rengam said.

“PAN AP will be forever grateful to Irene for her untiring guidance. With the help of her leadership and invaluable advice, we have been able to faithfully fulfill our commitment to serve the interests of small food producers, defend their rights, and advance their welfare. Words could not describe how much PAN AP will miss her and her insights that had firmly stood for the small farmers, agricultural workers, migrants, women, indigenous peoples and other marginalized sectors,” Rengam added.

Fernandez was a well-known human rights advocate and Director and co-founder of the Kuala Lumpur-based non-government group Tenaganita, which promotes the rights of migrant workers and other oppressed and poor people in Malaysia.

Fernandez was a teacher turned social activist, a commitment she resolutely held for almost four decades.

Aside from serving as the Executive Director of Tenaganita and Chairperson of PAN AP’s Steering Council, Fernandez was also a member of the respective Steering Committees of the Asian Rural Women’s Coalition (ARWC), the Coalition of Agricultural Workers International (CAWI), Asian Peasant Coalition (APC), and the People’s Coalition on Food Sovereignty (PCFS). She was also the Director of CARAM-Asia and the Vice Chairperson of the International Migrant Alliance (IMA).

In addition, Fernandez was among the founders of the Asia Pacific Forum on Women, Law and Development (APWLD) and a former executive member of the Committee on Asian Women, aside from helping establish various women and human rights organizations in Malaysia.

Fernandez had received numerous awards from various prestigious institutions in recognition of her work to stop violence against women and the abuses against migrant and poor workers including the Human Rights Watch Award in 1996; the Amnesty International Award in 1998; the International PEN Award in 2000; the Jonathan Mann Award in 2004; and the Right to Livelihood Award in 2005. She was also a recipient of an Honorary Doctorate in Social Medicine from the Vrije University in Amsterdam.

Because of her work, Fernandez herself had been a victim of the Malaysian government’s persecution. She went through a 13-year trial for writing a report that exposed the horrific conditions in immigration detention centers in Malaysia. She was convicted to a one-year imprisonment in 2003 but was released on bail, and appealed the decision to the High Court that eventually dropped the charges against her in 2008. ###

________________________________________

Pantomime Terror talk. RMIT 16.12.13

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The Squared Horizon – 6.6.2014 Nottingham Trent

The Squared Horizon: The Frames and Trajectories of Paul Virilio

Date: 6th June 2014, Nottingham Trent University, UK

In Desert Screen, Paul Virilio suggests the notion of a ‘squared horizon’ as a way of envisioning the interposition of the screen, multiple screens, in matters of war, conflict and international relations. Yet, the ‘squared horizon’ might also function as a starting point for bringing together the various frames and trajectories which make up Virilio’s oeuvre. The ‘squared horizon’ evokes the fragmented, pixelated existence of late capitalism, the perpetual dividing up of time into ever smaller units, the deferred, bracketed out future, put aside in favour of the instantaneous and immediate, the impact of urbanization with its grid systems and blocks on our experience of space, time and identity.

This conference invites papers around the theme of the ‘squared horizon’ as it might feasibly be applied to various aspects of Virilio’s work. It is hoped the event will bring together those using Virilio as a lens through which to read current socio-economic events, art, film, media and other forms of textual and visual representation as well as architecture and urbanism. At the same time, papers which place Virilio within a theoretical context in relation to interlocuteurs such as Baudrillard, Stiegler, Agamben, Bergson, Deleuze etc. are also welcomed.

A non-exhaustive list of potential topics:

  • Blocks of Time
  • Proximity, Distance, Depth
  • Deferred Futures
  • City Limits
  • The pixel
  • Screen Violence
  • Image-Maps
  • Frames and Trajectories
  • Proliferating Screens
  • Divided Selves
  • Conscience and the Senses

Please submit abstracts of no more than 250 words to sophie.fuggle@ntu.ac.uk and enda.mccaffrey@ntu.ac.uk by 28 February 2014.

Capital lectures in Spring term at Goldsmiths starting January 14

Marx Capital lecture course at Goldsmiths ✪

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Lecture course on Marx’s “Capital” at Goldsmiths: everybody is welcome

Capitalism and Cultural Studies – Prof John Hutnyk:

tuesday evenings from january 14, 2014 – 5pm-8pm Goldsmiths Room RHB 309. Free – all welcome.

No fee (unless, sorry, you are doing this for award) – and that, friends, is Willetts’ fault – though the Labour Party have a share of the blame too).

This course involves a close reading of Karl Marx’s Capital (Volume One).
90 minute lectures, 60 minutes discussion
The connections between cultural studies and critiques of capitalism are considered in an interdisciplinary context (cinema studies, anthropology, musicology, international relations, and philosophy) which reaches from Marx through to Film Studies, from ethnographic approaches to Heidegger, from anarchism and surrealism to German critical theory and poststructuralism/post-colonialism/post-early-for-christmas. Topics covered include: alienation, commodification, production, technology, education, subsumption, anti-imperialism, anti-war movement and complicity. Using a series of illustrative films (documentary and fiction) and key theoretical texts (read alongside the text of Capital), we examine contemporary capitalism as it shifts, changes, lurches through its very late 20th and early 21st century manifestations – we will look at how cultural studies copes with (or does not cope with) class struggle, anti-colonialism, new subjectivities, cultural politics, media, virtual and corporate worlds.
********** The weekly course reading guide is here: Cap and cult studs outline013 *************

The lectures/seminars begin on Tuesday 14th January 2014 between 5 and 8pm and will run for 11 weeks (with a week off in the middle) in the Richard Hoggart Building (Room 309), Goldsmiths College. You are required to bring their own copy of the Penguin, International Publishers/Progress Press of German editions of Karl Marx Capital Vol I. We are reading about 100 pages a week. (Please don’t get tricked into buying the abridged English edition/nonsense!)

Note: The Centre for Cultual Studies at Goldsmiths took a decision to make as many as possible of its lecture series open to the public without fee. Seminars, essays, library access etc remain for sale. Still, here is a chance to explore cultural studies without getting into debt. The classes are MA level, mostly in the day – though in spring the Capital course is early tuesday evening. We usually run 10 week courses. Reading required will be announced in class, but preliminary reading suggestions can also be found by following the links. RHB means main building of Goldsmiths – Richard Hoggart Building. More info on other free events from CCS here: http://hutnyk.wordpress.com/what-is-to-be-done/

Jai Bhim Comrade – Anand Patwardhan film – must see 14.11.13

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Bonfire night got a whole lot more interesting

bonfire of Austerity | 5 November 2013

Tomorrow (Tuesday 5th November) The Peoples’ Assembly is calling for a day of protest in every town and city in the country. The South East London People’s Assembly are hosting a ‘Bonfire of Cuts’ in Lewisham:

Bonfire of Cuts – 6pm @ Grassy Knoll opp. Lewisham DLR
-Bring effigies of politicians, bankers or the 1% to burn. Will be music, speakers and fire.

Procession against austerity, the bedroom tax and local
cuts – 4.30pm @ Catford Town Hall
-Bring placards or effigies for the route which will pass Lewisham Hospital, still under threat, and other key local places affected by the cuts on our way to the Bonfire.

Performance about austerity politics – 1.30pm @ Deptford Lounge Public Square

Action against poverty – 10am @ Deptford High Street/New Cross Road
-Led by the local food bank

Come to one or all of these acts of civil disobedience against austerity organised by the South East London People’s Assembly. All of them will be family friendly, and welcome participation from everyone.

Quid pro quo – talk at Melbourne Uni

“Quid pro quo’: Marx on India, from the Black Hole to the East of Capital”

John Hutnyk

The paper moves from re imagining Das Kapital if the book had been written at a major point of value extraction – Bengal – and follows this drift to the east up to the present day regeneration of the old East India Docks in London by a Chinese Corporation.

Venue: University of Melbourne, Friday 13 December 2013 (2pm-4 in the 4th floor common room John Medley Building)

paragoric

Abstract: My case is Marx writing on India, examining his theoretical and journalistic work together, each informed by an emergent anthropology, by historical hermeneutics, by a critique of political economy and by attention to a political contest that mattered more than philosophy. Marx reading history, already against the grain and without being able to make actual alliances, is nevertheless seeking allies in a revolutionary cause. Is it possible to observe Marx coming round to realise, after the shaping experience of the 1848-1852 European uprisings, the possibilities for the many different workers of the world to unite? I consider the sources Marx finds available, what he reads, and how his writing practice parses critical support as habitual politics, and how far subcontinental events, themes and allegories are a presence in the key moves of his masterwork Capital almost as if India were a refocussed bromide for Europe, just as slavery is for wages. I will take up four cases – the ‘founding’ of Calcutta by Job Charnock (disputed); the story of Clive sacking Chandernagor and going on to defeat Suraj-ud-duala at Palashi/Plassey in 1757 in retaliation for the ‘Black Hole’ (did it exist?); Disraeli verbosely saying nothing about the so-called Indian ‘mutiny’ 1857 (‘the East as a career’); and the question of legalizing Opium in China and the advent of Matheson-Jardine Company after the East India Company comes to an end (‘quid pro quo’). A coda returns us to London and the redevelopment of the old EIC shipyards in Deptford, returning Capital to the capital.

Inaugural Meeting of South East London Council for the Defence of British Universities:

Wednesday (6th November 2013), a meeting to start a South East London Group Council for the Defence of British Universities-Campaign for the Public University SE London Group will take place in Greenwich. The meeting is entitled ‘Greenwich and Goldsmiths in the market’ and will be at Maritime Greenwich (Queen Anne Building Room165) from 2-5pm.

Speakers include:
Patrick Ainley, Greenwich and co-author The Great Reversal, Education and Employment in a Moribund Economy: Comparing two universities in the market.
Des Freedman, Secretary Goldsmiths’ UCU and co-author The Assault on Universities, A Manifesto for Resistance: Resistance to the assault on the universities.
 

talk at RMIT Melbourne

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John Hutnyk
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Pantomime Terror: MIA’s lyrical opposition to Capital, Google and the Border Patrols.

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Monday 16 December 2013 4:30PM (room tbc)

Within the prevailing ‘keep calm and carry on’ conditions of the UK security regime, those who find safety in repressive complicity are also necessarily disabled from criticism of the war-effect as it appears everywhere. At best this turns anti-war opposition into performance, staged protest and the lyricism of music, song, drum and video. In this talk I examine the culture-inflected, low-intensity war alongside the shooting war. The video provocations of artists like M.I.A. (Mathangi Arulpragasam) can be read as dramatising difficulties that have occupied British South Asian musicians, writers, filmmakers and commentators in the context of a domestic civil liberties crackdown that replicates detention and terror security repression elsewhere.

talk is on the same day as one by Sophie Fuggle…

Flyers with room details:

GRC Seminar John Hutnyk 161213

GRC Seminar Sophie Fuggle 161213

 

Teach out talk crib notes

Notes for talk at Goldsmiths strike UCU ‘teach out’. 31.10.2013
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UCU strike at Goldsmiths includes public teach out at Library picket.

Strike 31.10.2013

9.30am ‘Banking on Food Poverty’, Tom Henri (STACS)

9.50am ‘Pantomime of Terror’, John Hutnyk (CCS)

10.10am ‘What is education for?’ John Wadsworth, Clare Kelly and Maggie Pitfield (Education)

10.30am ‘The internet, security and London Crypto Festival’, Matt Fuller (CCS)

10.50am ‘Digital capitalism and activism’, Veronica Barassi (Media & Comms)

11.10am ‘The militant image’, Ros Gray (Visual Cultures)

11.30am ‘Exclusion and higher education’, Claudia Bernard (STACS)

11.30am ‘Where now for Occupy?’ David Graeber (ex-Anthropology)

11.50am ‘Pedagogy/Practice/Protest’, Irit Rogoff (Visual Cultures)

 

http://www.goldsmithsucu.org/

Samuel Weber goldsmiths 30.10.2013

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Tragedy and Trauerspiel: Hölderlin and Benjamin

Wednesday, October 30, 2013
17:00-19:00
New Academic Building, LG01
**Free and open to the public.

This talk begins an investigation of the relation of Benjamin’s notion of tragedy and trauerspiel to Hölderlin’s Remarks on Oedipus and Antigone, which in their own way reflect on the relation of classical tragedy to its modern counterparts.

Suggested preparatory readings for this lecture include Benjamin’s remarks on the relation of tragedy to Trauerspiel in The Origin of the German Mourning-Play, as well as Hölderlin’s Remarks on Oedipus and Antigone.

SAMUEL WEBER is Avalon Foundation Professor of Humanities at Northwestern University and co-director of its Paris Program in Critical Theory. After studying with Paul de Man and Theodor Adorno, he co-translated and wrote a critical introduction to Prisms, Adorno’s most important book of cultural criticism, which helped define the way in which the work of the Frankfurt School would be read and understood in the English-speaking world. Professor Weber has published seminal books on Balzac, Lacan, and Freud, on the relation of institutions to interpretation, and on media philosophy. His most recent book is Benjamin’s -abilities (Harvard UP), which is being translated into Chinese for publication by Beijing UP.

This event is co-sponsored by the Centre for Cultural Studies, the Department of English and Comparative Literature, the Department of Art, and the Graduate School.

Website: http://www.gold.ac.uk/cultural-studies/calendar/?id=6893
For more information, contact j.ng@gold.ac.uk

Citizens: On Marx and Kane: Objects, Commodities, Souvenirs 21.11.2013 Giessen University

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Note: the same day as this.

Participation in Museums: Trinketizing the Audience.

Notes for Museum ‘debate’ in Liverpool on November 11.

There is much talk of participation and much effort to remodel foyers, and to an extent interiors, plus toilets, cafes, bookshops and websites, to enable easy access. Asked to be curmudgeon-esque, it seems clear to me that this participation-talk is pseudo-participation. Every participation seems the same, everything alike, repeated patterns, even colour schemes – so many pastels, and fluorescent red plastic chairs. Some of the chairs are little, for kids, or for breaking dad’s back.

How did it get to be that pseudo-participation rules? The dominant culture has no anxiety about having people walk past the exhibits, but do not let them touch you. File on by, stop perhaps for a second, for an hour, but only in a standardized way. Check the visit off on a list. Culture 101.

Nothing without regulation – aims and outcomes carefully calibrated on a planning form that no-one reads, inside a system dominated by the same malignant and parasitic bureaucracy that has overtaken health and education in the hyper-administration. The bureaucracy does not even administer anything today, just keeps the forms in circulation, and the school groups filing through the doors.

And it is this pseudo-routine that must be thoroughly tested. We must know our audience, using the very latest in dumbed-down questionnaires that even newspaper-selling leftist street-vendors would disavow except as props. This is not even market research – so long as the school groups keep on marching past in tight formation. Participation in the most bland formal sameness – Adorno pointed to a sexual lozenge at the heart of the culture industry, and for sure he also meant the museum as pseudo-education. Where everything should be clean. ‘Nothing should be moist’.

We are so far from education here except education as reinforced class privilege. Education is not a two-hour visit – give them 20 hours, even 20 weeks – and they must read in advance. Here cultural exposure is not instruction but packaged ‘culture’ – and education is not a social good, but ‘education’ as national programming. An articulated system for inculcating national ideology and the flat flat flat dissemination of British identity and imaginary pasts. Books in the bookshop on popular themes – tea, crockery, swords. The empty materials that can be rearranged for some groups to dominate others.

Because commodification is the new rule, just like the old one. Different levels according to price, knick-knacks or bespoke jewelry, a café and a bistro, a members room. The collection is sacrificed to the expansion of the foyer, the t-shirts and tote bags carry the branded museum like a picture on a mug. There is no room for the collection, but room aplenty for postcard reproductions. The collection is not a collection, not a research effort, not a scholarly project, but a beauty contest.

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Three props – a toy wooden horse, my gilt-edged copy of Arabian Nights, and a carved wooden Ganesh idol.

Participation cannot be a Trojan Horse, smuggling the old kings of the elite cloister into the pockets of a population plundered and left to rue the day. Participation is not a flash mob.

Neither should we rest with the admirable storytelling device of Scheherazade from the epic One Thousand and One Nights. She tells stories every night – Sinbad, Ali Baba, Aladdin – to ward off the threat of the despotic ruler Shahryar, and through her stories eventually she turns him to good. But insofar as this leaves the storyteller as the one with power, and the king in place, the population remains a distant audience, titillated, but fundamentally untouched. Great stories they are, but the structure of interrogation remains, she could be telling her stories to the despotic king, or in Guantanamo today to the CIA interrogators, or the national press. What she needs to do is teach others to tell stories, and this also takes time – perhaps 1001 nights, sometimes more, different in each case and not a blanket solution. Democracy is not an occasionally vote.

What if it were Ganesh that ran the museum. Tasked with writing down the epic Mahabharata – 100 thousand verses – as it was told by the sage Vyasa, Ganesh’s pencil wears down and in order to keep transcribing he snaps off his tusk and dips it in ink to continue. He is the patron of all studious soles, dedicated to a popular scholarship, unending. He is not an occasional visitor on a joy ride.

What we need perhaps is the best of all three of these figures. Enticement into the museum, by horse if need be, then good stories that undo the games of dominant power, and a celebration of scholarship that is not just a two-hour visit, but a lifelong commitment. Museums might be this. With these patrons.

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Crisis and Critique of the State – 25-26 Oct 2013 – Goldsmiths

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CCS Events coming up in October 2013

Thursday 10 October

Wednesday 16 October

Thursday 17 October

Wednesday 23 October

Thursday 24 October

Friday 25 October

Saturday 26 October

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