Category Archives: ✪ what’s on

Translating Capital in context, politics, struggles

Originally posted on trinketization:

From Subversive Festival Zagreb, May 2014. 

John Hutnyk: Translating Capital in context, politics, struggles
The School of Contemporary Humanities
moderator: Dunja Matić

the dedication, the prefaces, the first sentence, the tenth/eight chapter, the teaching factory, malignant and parasitic, etc…

[errata: New York Daily Tribune, not herald. Fudged Horace and Dante quote, not rude enough about Zombie’s… but otherwise…]

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GLOBAL RESISTANCE, FROM FERGUSON TO PEOPLE’S KOREA

23 October 2014 Hausman’s Bookshop Kings Cross London:

tricon

 

The people of Ferguson have heroically stood up in the face of brutal repression, resisting the police in the streets in the aftermath of yet another young black man having been gunned down by law enforcement. Amongst many other Global South governments, the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (‘North Korea’) took a definite stand with the protesters, condemning the human rights situation of the U.S. and the racism of its system. The ties between North Korea and the Black Power movement in the US are nothing new, and go back to a powerful relationship that was built with the Black Panther Party in the 1960s. Join us to explore the internationalist ties between the DPRK, the liberation struggles in Africa andthe Black liberation movement in the US, and how these connect to the wider global struggle against colonialism and imperialism.

The event will be held at London’s best-known radical bookshop, Housmans (http://www.housmans.com/) on Caledonian Road.

Confirmed speakers so far (more to be announced):

YONGHO THAE (Q&A)
First secretary of the DPRK embassy in London, talking about North Korea’s history of resistance to foreign domination, and answering your questions about the DPRK.

ZAKI BARUTI
President/General of the Universal African Peoples Organization, and grassroots organiser in St Louis, talking about the situation on the ground in Ferguson

ASARI SOBUKWE
Representative of the All-African People’s Revolutionary Party (AAPRP), talking about the history of North Korean solidarity with the African liberation movements and with the Black Power movement in the US.

MARCEL CARTIER
Rapper and activist, talking about his recent trip to DPRK and joining the dots between Pyongyang, Ferguson, Donetsk, Palestine, Syria, Cuba and elsewhere.

The event will be chaired by writer and music producer Carlos Martinez (Agent of Change).

The event is organised by the Tricontinental Anti-imperialist Platform, a recently-formed organisation that seeks to promoted maximum unity in the global struggle against imperialism.

‘The Killing of Blair Peach, Anti-Racist Protest and Police Brutality’

Defend the Right to Protest present

‘The Killing of Blair Peach, Anti-Racist Protest and Police Brutality’
with David Renton and Tony Warner
Wednesday 15th October, 7pm

Hausmans Bookshop Kings Cross London.
Entry £3, redeemable against any purchase

Blair Peach was a 33 year old teacher killed on a demonstration on 23 April 1979 at Southall against the National Front. He is one of just three protesters to have been killed by the police in Britain since 1945. He died from a single blow to his head by a police officer, as Peach was retreating from a protest which had finished.

In 2010, following Ian Tomlinson’s death, the government published the Cass report into Peach’s killing. Cass identified the six police officers who were present when the fatal blow was struck, and recommended that three of them should be prosecuted for obstructing his enquiry. The Cass report was never disclosed to the Inquest into Peach’s death, and its central reports were kept hidden for 30 years from the jury, from the press, and from Blair Peach’s family.

David Renton will be discussing his new pamphlet ‘Who Killed Blair Peach’ (published by Defend the Right to Protest, 2014) which sets out why exactly Cass reached his conclusions, how his reasoning casts a light on the identity of Peach’s killer, and calls for a fresh inquest into Blair Peach’s killing.

David will be joined by founder of ‘Black History Walks’ Tony Warner who will consider contemporary cases of police racism and brutality. Using archive footage, newspaper reports and personal testimony Tony will cover cases of black deaths in custody from 1960s to the present day, with relation to geography, community resistance, international history and white media representation of the ‘black body’.

About the speakers
David Renton a barrister and a member of the committees of Defend the Right to Protest and the Haldane Society of Socialist Lawyers.
Tony Warner is a historian and founder of ‘Black History Walks’.

PART OF ISLINGTON BLACK HISTORY MONTH

A Pay Rise is Not Enough – We Need a Plan C

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Provoked by Parliament’s steadfast commitment to a Plan A of Austerity, the rusty machinery of the Trades Union Congress has provided the customary opposition in the form of its Plan B: marching for the alternative, marching for jobs, growth and justice, and now marching for a pay rise. We think it’s important that we join our fellow workers on 18 October, but we do so critical of the TUC, its politics and its innocuous demand. In short, we need a Plan C.
The march on 18 October will be the biggest national mobilisation of the working class in two years. This is something the TUC is relatively good at – which is reasonable to expect given its immense budget. However, this is also an organisation which has joined forces with the Confederation of Business and Industry (CBI) in backing workfare programmes, and which increasingly appears interested in only engaging with – let alone fighting for – only a narrow subset of workers. Within the formal work economy, employment is increasingly casualised, while ‘informal’ work such as care – which is equally crucial to the generation of profit – remains as marginalised as ever within the TUC’s chauvinistic and rigid workerism.

The demand for a pay rise seems to be more closely tied to legitimising Labour’s new policy for an £8 minimum wage than creating a movement to challenge and transform the present reality of working class existence in Britain. Labour’s plan for a pay rise – 26p per hour on top of the existing minimum wage by 2020 – is an insult. It’s a grand plan to remunerate the increasingly impoverished and growing working poor with less than the price of a bag of crisps. The TUC’s support for such a policy is an embarrassment.

Throughout the week of the 13 October, we will be joining the national strikes and picket lines in the run up to the demonstration. One-day stop work actions obviously have their limitations, but any hope we have of strike action becoming more general and widespread means we must engage, participate and make connections. We have launched #strikeup to collect reflections, dreams and counter-narratives of what work and striking could look like in the future, and we encourage others to strike up similar conversations on their local picket lines. We will then join the march on 18 October, standing with our fellow workers while strongly critical of the TUC’s complicity.

A pay rise is not enough. We demand the ability to live without overwhelming insecurity. We demand to work with flexibility and on our own terms. We demand an end to the double burden of unremunerated care work. We demand an end to sexism and racism in the workplace. We demand a movement that does not limit itself to pay rises but one which dreams of a world beyond work. We demand a Plan C.

‘Music & Politics’ – Pantomime Terror

‘Music & Politics’ with John Pandit from Asian Dub Foundation and Aki Nawaz from Fun-Da-Mental
Wednesday 8th October, 7pm

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http://www.housmans.com/events.php
Entry £3, redeemable against any purchase

We Need To Talk About Work

Plan C London would like to invite you to:
 
We Need To Talk About Work: a series of public discussions about the crisis of the work society and strategies for moving beyond it.
7.30pm Tuesday, 30 Sept Common House
5 Pundersons Gardens, Bethnal Green
Plan C is calling for two things in October:

* Mass support, solidarity actions and participation in the national trade union strike on October 14th.
* A bloc at the TUC demo on October 18th in London.

We want to open up the ideas and plans for these interventions to everyone who shares our problem with work. We’ve already started these discussion at our festival (Fast Forward 2014) and want to continue them through a series of public discussions entitled: “We Need to Talk about Work” across different cities in the UK.

Through these discussions we’re hoping to collectively develop shared perspectives, and to translate our ideas into strategies for the struggle for freedom from waged slavery. These discussions will take place and the end of September, and we encourage everyone who can’t come to one of Plan C’s discussions to organise similar events in other places.

On 18th October the Trades Union Congress (TUC) will be organising its first national demonstration since 2012. Against the Plan A of austerity, the TUC and the left wing of the Labour Party are proposing a Plan B. With the slogan “Britain needs a payrise” the TUC have fallen in line behind Labour Party policies: clinging to the minimum wage, gesturing towards the living wage and mumbling about a higher minimum wage if employers can afford it. The TUC’s addition to this paltry collection of promises is a demand for a ‘crackdown’ on executive pay.

These policy proposals, and others like them, fall far short of both what we need and what we want. The problem isn’t just that we’re not paid enough for the work we do; it’s that most of the work we do isn’t paid at all. The problem isn’t just that our wages are too low; it’s that wages are still the only option open to us in order to survive. It’s not just that work doesn’t pay enough, it’s that we have to work for wages in the first place.

The demand for less work and more money is more realistic than the hope amongst the TUC and the Labour Party that all this current unpleasantness could be got rid of if we just got back to how it was before. You know, back when Britain made things goddamit, employers paid good family wages, and everyone had a job. The peddlers of this fantasy seem to be innocent of the fact that capitalism, and history, has moved on. They also seem innocent of the fact that we wouldn’t want their rosy dream of the 50s even if we could have it. It would mean going back to some version of the past (one that never really existed) where many of us would have to retreat back into the home so there could be ‘full employment’ for our husbands. It would mean rejigging the global economy in order to get back to some good old fashioned colonial exploitation which kept money flowing into British coffers.

We look forward to meeting you at one of the public meetings or on the streets on Oct 18. For more information emaillondon@weareplanc.org

Riverside Church event of note: Cornel West and BA, NYC Nov 15 2014

Cornel West and Bob Avakian will engage in a LIVE dialogue on:
REVOLUTION AND RELIGION: The Fight for Emancipation and the Role of Religion

Saturday, November 15, 3-7 pm at The Riverside Church in NYC

 
 
Bob Avakian is the Chairman of the Revolutionary Communist Party, USA. Bob Avakian (BA) came alive as a revolutionary in the 1960s. Since then he has given his heart and knowledge to serving the cause of revolution and the emancipation of humanity, and has consistently taken responsibility for leading the revolutionary movement – theoretically and practically. He is an innovative and critical thinker who has brought forward a new synthesis of communism. His extensive and wide-ranging body of work includes writings and commentary on revolutionary strategy, philosophy, ethics, science, basketball, music,
and religion, including the book Away with All Gods! Unchaining the Mind and Radically Changing the World. For more, go to revcom.us
 
Cornel West is widely recognized as one of the most important and provocative public intellectuals of our time. A prolific writer and lecturer, West is Professor of Philosophy and Christian Practice at Union Theological Seminary in New York. A champion for the oppressed, West’s writing, speaking and teaching draw inspiration from and weave together the Christian and Black prophetic traditions, radical democracy and jazz, R&B and hip hop. His book, Race Matters, changed the course of America’s dialogue on race and justice. Cornel West’s latest book, Black Prophetic Fire, will be published in October 2014. For more, go to cornelwest.com
 
NOVEMBER 15, 2014, 3-7 PM
The Riverside Church, 490 Riverside Drive, New York City
Presented by Revolution Books & The Bob Avakian Institute For more information go to revcom.us.
For ticket information go to Revolution Books.
146 West 26th Street, New York, N.Y. 10001, 212.691.3345 www.revolutionbooksnyc.org

Archive: 1989 review article “Clifford Geertz as a Cultural System”

An old review:

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Hutnyk, J 1989 ‘Clifford Geertz as a Cultural System’ Social Analysis 26:91-107 

Click on the paragraph or here for the PDF Clifford Geertz as a Cultural System. (the pdf unfortunately duplicates page 97)

 

Anthropology

Anthro

A shelfie for teaching a five section anthropology course at Zeppelin Uni. Not everything is here, but starting with some basic stuff. A few things I am missing…so people might write to help and tell me what has come out in anthro in the last five years that is good on violence (Casey High, I have some of your stuff). I need more on politics and domestic economy (have AM and Silvia Federici of course). What else?

The five parts are thus::

1 Malinowski and Fieldwork Method/Writing Culture (Narayan, Clifford, Spivak, Taussig, Paglin)

2 Photogenic Poverty – Gift, Contract, Exchange and Economy (E-P, Azoulay, Federici, Mitropoulos)

3 Writing Structuralism – Lévi-Strauss and Myth today (Lévi-Strauss, Geertz, Derrida)

4 Political and Military Anthropology – (Mao, Marx, Swedenburg, COIN, Taussig)

5 Corporate and Glossy Anthropology – studying ‘up’ (Nader, Marcus, Rao, Price)

 

Kim’s Game

john hutnyk:

and this return to 2006 because we were explaining Kim’s game to Emile on the train the other day – another Scouting link, but this has a certain trinket and art object, surrealist games, aspect – even if Kipling made it a spy training thing.

Originally posted on trinketization:


I have a brother called Kim (Hiya) and in the book I am writing now (‘Jungle Studies’) I will have some sharp things to say about Rudyard Kipling the creator of Mowgli, Baloo, Bagheera and Akhela, as well as about his close friend, Baden-Powell, founder of concentration camps and of the Scouts.

It was in the Scouts that my brother and I endured various militaristic drill sessions, were forced into a peculiar form of (mild) child-labour collecting newspapers, beer bottles and doing ‘bob-a-job; (which I liked because I worked for a certain elderly woman called Mrs Chandler, one-time girlfriend of Ned Kelly) and it was as Scouts and ‘cubs’ that we learnt of “Kim’s Game”. This game was a memory test where you would be shown a tray of objects (I would now call them trinkets of course) and after a minute these were covered up and…

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Scouting Shame NYT.

john hutnyk:

A brief return to May 2009 and wonder when the Scout effect – get em while they are young – morphed into hatred of concentration camps. They certainly did not tell us these things as we tied our knots to win badges and the like.

Originally posted on trinketization:

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“‘There is no document of civilization that is not simultaneously a document of barbarism‘” (Benjamin p. vii)

A photograph of five young Americans in combat gear beside a ‘Homeland Security’ bus graces the front page of the New York Times on May 13 2009. This image catches my eye on a day when newly discovered atrocity photos from CIA ‘facilities’ in Afghanistan and Iraq should be published, but are not so as to avoid undermining the war effort and the troops at the front. Anxious excuses are conjured for spin and impression management… we get this unbelievable shot of Explorer scouts tooled up for the kill.

The Explorers program, a coeducational affiliate of the Boy Scouts of America that began 60 years ago, is training thousands of young people in skills used to confront terrorism, illegal immigration and escalating border violence — an intense ratcheting up of one of…

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Pantomime Terror: Music and Politics

Originally posted on trinketization:

A welcome boost to sales numbers last month – some booksellers are doing it right. get them here

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Communist Headache #1

link to PDF

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Visiting Faraway: an installation by Geoff Weary at the Art Gallery of NSW

Originally posted on trinketization:

Gael Clichy 5

This one is really from the Vault. It was printed in the Melbourne art magazine Agenda, in about 1989 or so. The totally irrelevant picture I have chosen to illustrate this is not of Weary’s art, but since Man City beat the Gunners 4-1 yesterday I thought it amusing that when I searched ‘weary’ this picture turned up, with the caption ‘a weary Arsenal…’ Apologies, but the image that illustrated this piece in its original form will be retrieved when I’ve dug still further down into the swamp…

‘Visiting Faraway: an installation by Geoff Weary at the Art Gallery of NSW’

- by John Hutnyk

There is no way that the ‘main event’ could be ignored in this tale.

In a room tucked away beneath the Guggenheim collection, which dominates attendances at the NSW Gallery this summer, Geoff Weary’s video installation waits for an audience.  Weary had been artist-in-residence at the time…

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Do bee do bee do

john hutnyk:

buzz – needs a rewrite…

Originally posted on trinketization:

beesHere is the first of ‘Eleven theses on art and politics’ for my talk in Copenhagen on thursday (‘Forms of engagement, Configurations of politics’ conference):

1. Do Bees have art?

“what distinguishes the worst architect from the best of bees is that the architect builds the cell in his mind before he constructs it in wax.” – Marx, Capital I, p284

In Marx’s passage about the bees and the architects, clearly it is the bees who do not have representation, despite their excellent construction skills. The (human) architect constructs a structure in the mind (or on paper) before building it in the world. We can call this art. If we are to take Marx’s analogy seriously, bees do not have art, they have sting and a love of nectar, but no art.

But if art is different to politics, do bees have politics? Is the art of politics one of…

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Note for interview on politics of art.

Originally posted on trinketization:

That diagnostic that says political art is not useful, or is only useful as a part of an explicitly political project is almost as bad as that which insists that politics have an aesthetic. The old slogan If I can’t dance it’s not my revolution, which I do actually have on my wall at home, is too often an alibi for forgetting that art – and dancing is art here – has been wholly recuperated by the culture industry such that even the fantasy of art for art sake – obscure dancing at the back of the hall – is also bound up with the entrance fee, the music cd sales, the charts, the Internet sites upon which bloggers lol at your awkward moves, and the merely escapist illusion that time away from work, which is only afterall, recovery time, is somehow anti-capitalist. Dancing is through and through reified.

What…

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On the Courtyard, talk at Tate from January

Originally posted on trinketization:

On 26 Jan 2013, a talk at Tate Modern on the Sharjah Art Foundation Biennale proposed theme of New Cultural Cartographies. My views, given late in the day, reliant on Gayatri Spivak’s hugely influential work, and following talks by the excellent Sarat Maharaj, Yuko Hasegawa and Wael Shawky (interviewed). Slightly combative  and with a slip in putting the Danes in Chandenaggor, it is the talk I wish I could have parsed for Princeton – but that was not recorded, even though some people asked for it (thanks Anisha, Saleh, Ben). Click the picture to get to the Tate link.

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Participation in Museums: Trinketizing the Audience.

john hutnyk:

retread – should be rewriting this soon…

Originally posted on trinketization:

Notes for Museum ‘debate’ in Liverpool on November 11.

There is much talk of participation and much effort to remodel foyers, and to an extent interiors, plus toilets, cafes, bookshops and websites, to enable easy access. Asked to be curmudgeon-esque, it seems clear to me that this participation-talk is pseudo-participation. Every participation seems the same, everything alike, repeated patterns, even colour schemes – so many pastels, and fluorescent red plastic chairs. Some of the chairs are little, for kids, or for breaking dad’s back.

How did it get to be that pseudo-participation rules? The dominant culture has no anxiety about having people walk past the exhibits, but do not let them touch you. File on by, stop perhaps for a second, for an hour, but only in a standardized way. Check the visit off on a list. Culture 101.

Nothing without regulation – aims and outcomes carefully calibrated on a…

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South Asian Television Studies articles free till Dec 2014

john hutnyk:

reminder…

Originally posted on trinketization:

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The future is going to come true, 1993 Newtown

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Zoogenesis: Thinking Encounter with Animals Press Release

john hutnyk:

Richard Iveson’s book is out. Buy via the Pavement site: http://www.pavementbooks.com/

Originally posted on zoogenesis:

My new book, Zoogenesis: Thinking Encounter with Animals, to be published officially on 15 July 2014

Press release:

Please email sophie@pavementbooks.com for contact details, review copies, photographs, and author biography

Disrupting the Economy of Genocide
Encountering Other Animals Amid the Necropolitical Exploitation of Life

Published by Pavement Books, Zoogenesis: Thinking Encounter with Animals by Richard Iveson offers radical new possibilities for encountering and thinking with other animals, and for the politics of animal liberation. Arguing that the machinations of power that legitimize the killing of nonhuman animals are thoroughly entangled with the ‘noncriminal’ putting to death of human animals, Zoogenesis shows how such legitimation consists in a theatrics of displacement that transforms singular, nonsubstitutable living beings into mute, subjugated bodies that may be slaughtered but never murdered. In an attempt to disrupt what is, quite simply, the instrumentalizing and exploitative economy of genocide, Iveson…

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Songs for the Marx Trot 13 July 2014

As Theo would say: “tune”

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Marx Trot 2014

john hutnyk:

5 days to go…

Originally posted on trinketization:

Marx Trot on sunday 13 July, starts at 2.30 archway tube…

Mshelfie

A day of revolutionary dawdling, pints, and ending up awash somewhere on Tottenham Court Rd… The annual Marx trot this year will be on Sunday 13 July. All welcome. Lal Salaam!

We will again be leaving from Archway tube 2:30 pm, then to Highgate Cemetery Marx’s Grave about 3pm – heading across the Heath to the Lord Southampton pub which was the old man’s local on Grafton Terrace – then onwards to Engels’ house, then to the pub where the Manifesto was adopted by the Communist League, – now a crappy cocktail bar – and more… All welcome (kids could surely come for the first couple of hours – but warning, its a longish walk across the heath between Highgate and the Grafton Terrace House BYO libations for the first part).

[word to the wise: bring some tinnies in a bag -…

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Fast Forward 2014: Demanding the Future? Sept. 12th-14th

FF14-landscape_01 (1)

FFW2014 is a weekend of discussions, plenaries, workshops, walking, climbing and socialising. We hope FFW2014 will contribute to building new relationships, new ideas, new energies and new strategies that help equip us to enact the future.

The central theme of the event is “Demanding the Future?”: We’ll be inquiring into what it means, and what it could mean, to make demands. Who makes them, and who are they aimed at? Can demands help us build our counter-power? What do they achieve? Can demands – possible and impossible – move us beyond a simplistic revolution/reform debate? The format for these discussions will be small group based facilitated discussions which will allow for lots of participation and engagement.

Alongside these core discussions on demands there will be focus sessions on particular topics and issues. There will be space alongside these focus group sessions to organise your own workshops, relax with friends new and old or simply to enjoy the brilliant location on our walking or climbing trips. In the evenings we are planning larger plenary events. We will be running a bar at the hostel and are hoping to arrange evening entertainment.

The full event programme will be released later in the Summer.

When?  FFW2014 will take place between 12 pm (noon) on Friday 12th until 5pm on Sunday 14th September.

Where FFW2014 will be taking over the whole of the YHA Edale in the heart of the Peak District:http://www.yha.org.uk/hostel/edale

Lincoln Emery Alpern – says come to the 2014 Marx Trot (in this teaser from last year) #marx #london

Marx Trot 2014

Marx Trot IS on sunday 13 July, starts at 2.30 archway tube…

A day of revolutionary dawdling, pints, and ending up awash somewhere on Tottenham Court Rd… The annual Marx trot this year will be on Sunday 13 July. All welcome. Lal Salaam!

We will again be leaving from Archway tube 2:30 pm, then to Highgate Cemetery Marx’s Grave about 3pm – heading across the Heath to the Lord Southampton pub which was the old man’s local on Grafton Terrace – then onwards to Engels’ house, then to the pub where the Manifesto was adopted by the Communist League, – now a crappy cocktail bar – and more… All welcome (kids could surely come for the first couple of hours – but warning, its a longish walk across the heath between Highgate and the Grafton Terrace House BYO libations for the first part).

Marx Trot 2014

Marx Trot on sunday 13 July, starts at 2.30 archway tube…

Mshelfie

A day of revolutionary dawdling, pints, and ending up awash somewhere on Tottenham Court Rd… The annual Marx trot this year will be on Sunday 13 July. All welcome. Lal Salaam!

We will again be leaving from Archway tube 2:30 pm, then to Highgate Cemetery Marx’s Grave about 3pm – heading across the Heath to the Lord Southampton pub which was the old man’s local on Grafton Terrace – then onwards to Engels’ house, then to the pub where the Manifesto was adopted by the Communist League, – now a crappy cocktail bar – and more… All welcome (kids could surely come for the first couple of hours – but warning, its a longish walk across the heath between Highgate and the Grafton Terrace House BYO libations for the first part).

[word to the wise: bring some tinnies in a bag - and sunscreen, umbrella as weather dictates and dosh for dinner (possibly in a footba-oriented venue). The early part of our route involves considerable walking - on the heath - kids are very welcome for the first few hours but after 7.00 it possibly gets a bit adult oriented - well, I mean we visit pubs Marx used to haunt - gespenst-like - in Soho. Mostly harmless, but its cup final night]

Previous trots = http://hutnyk.wordpress.com/2013/07/05/marx-trot-this-sunday-2-30-archway-tube-2/ and http://hutnyk.wordpress.com/2012/07/03/marx-trot-2012-july-7-2/and here: http://hutnyk.wordpress.com/2011/05/21/marx-trot-29-5-2011/

Pics of the houses: http://www.marxists.org/archive/marx/photo/london/index.htm

Other links:

http://www.alphabetthreat.co.uk/pasttense/pdf/communistclub.pdf

The Great Windmill Street venue is where Liebknecht says the Manifesto was adopted by the League of the Just/German Workers Educational Association/Communist League – but some say it was at the White Hart in Dury Lane. In any case Marx lectures on Capital at Great Windmill Street, but see here:http://www.alphabetthreat.co.uk/pasttense/pdf/communistclub.pdf

For Leninists – a diversion on the trot might take in Charing Cross station, and areas near Kings Cross and Pentonville:http://sarahjyoung.com/site/2011/01/16/russians-in-london-lenin/

Dancing the first international! http://history-is-made-at-night.blogspot.co.uk/2009_10_01_archive.html

A pub crawl with Karl http://www.mytimemachine.co.uk/pubcrawl.htm

Fast Forward 2014: Demanding the Future

image

FFW2014 is a weekend of discussions, plenaries, workshops, walking, climbing and socialising. We hope FFW2014 will contribute to building new relationships, new ideas, new energies and new strategies that help equip us to enact the future.

The central theme of the event is “Demanding the Future?”: We’ll be inquiring into what it means, and what it could mean, to make demands. Who makes them, and who are they aimed at? Can demands help us build our counter-power? What do they achieve? Can demands – possible and impossible – move us beyond a simplistic revolution/reform debate? The format for these discussions will be small group based facilitated discussions which will allow for lots of participation and engagement.

Alongside these core discussions on demands there will be focus sessions on particular topics and issues. There will be space alongside these focus group sessions to organise your own workshops, relax with friends new and old or simply to enjoy the brilliant location on our walking or climbing trips. In the evenings we are planning larger plenary events. We will be running a bar at the hostel and are hoping to arrange evening entertainment.

The full event programme will be released later in the Summer.
When? FFW2014 will take place between 12 pm (noon) on Friday 12th until 5pm on Sunday 14th September.

Where? FFW2014 will be taking over the whole of the YHA Edale in the heart of the Peak District: http://www.yha.org.uk/hostel/edale

How do I get there? The YHA is a beautiful 30min walk from Edale Station, which is on the Sheffield-Manchester line (http://tinyurl.com/ksc79nv). There will also be a shuttle bus running from the station. There is some, but limited, car parking available at the venue.

Accommodation? All will have beds! Accommodation is in bunk rooms. There will be family rooms for those with children. We are also committed to providing women-only
accommodation. Some accommodation is step-free. You can tell us your needs on the ticket form.

Food? Drink? The event is fully catered with very nice food, and the cost is included in your ticket price. There will be a (cheap) bar.

Childcare? We are committed to providing appropriate and safe childcare which suits participants. We are also planning/asking for suggestions for activities in the day which all the children and young people who attend. There is space on the ticket application form to tell us what you need.

Cost? Tickets (all-in) are either (subsidised) £25, (cost) £50, or (solidarity) £75. We have adopted a three -tier ticketing system so that we won’t exclude anyone from participating for financial reasons.Please get in contact with us if you have other requirements.

What do I do now? – Click the image to go to Plan C and book.

If you have any other questions, please email festival@weareplanc.org. Hope to see you there!

The East as a Career – talk 22.5.2014

  • Logo Universität Hamburg

  • Institut für Volkskunde / Kulturanthropologie

  • 16. Mai 2014 | Studium und Lehre

    Do. 22.5. | Kollaboratives Forschen mit John Hutnyk

    John Hutnyk, London: “The East as a career: Marx Writing Capital and the Value of Bengal.”

    Um 18.15 Uhr in Raum 220

     

Virilio conference: The Squared Horizon: 6. June 2014 Nottingham Trent.

The Squared Horizon: The Frames and Trajectories of Paul Virilio

6 June 2014. Nottingham Trent University

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In Desert Screen, Paul Virilio suggests the notion of a ‘squared horizon’ as a way of envisioning the interposition of the screen, multiple screens, in matters of war, conflict and international relations. Yet, the ‘squared horizon’ might also function as a starting point for bringing together the various frames and trajectories which make up Virilio’s oeuvre. The ‘squared horizon’ evokes the fragmented, pixelated existence of late capitalism, the perpetual dividing up of time into ever smaller units, the deferred, bracketed out future, put aside in favour of the instantaneous and immediate, the impact of urbanization with its grid systems and blocks on our experience of space, time and identity.

We are pleased to present a one-day conference focusing on the work of Paul Virilio organized around theme of the squared horizon.

Attendance to the conference is free but please reserve your place here so we have an idea of numbers.

Conference Schedule (room tbc)

9.30 Registration and Coffee

10.00 Welcome

10.10 PLENARY

The Big Night: Into the Ultracity - John Armitage, University of Southampton

11.00 Coffee

11.30 SQUARING OFF – VIRILIO AND SPACE

The secret underground bunkers do exist!!! - Michael Mulvihill, Artist.

The Negative Abyss - Mark Featherstone, Keele University

Topological Variations in Virilio’s Le Futurisme de l’instant - Enda Mccaffrey, Nottingham Trent University

13.00 LUNCH

14.00 SQUARING CIRCLES – VIRILIO AND TIME

War and Post-War: Memory and European Identity in Paul Virilio’s Phenomenology of Modern Technology - Neil Turnbull, Nottingham Trent University

Concepts and Catrastophes: Jean Baudrillard and Paul Virilio - Gerry Coulter, Bishop’s University, Canada

15.00 Coffee

15.30 SQUARE HEADS – VIRILIO AND THE DIGITAL IMAGINATION

Framing the Criminal - Sophie Fuggle, Nottingham Trent University

The digi-child and dromospheric sensibility - Felicity Coleman, Manchester Metropolitan University

Inner screens and cybernetic battlefields: Paul Virilio and Robocop - Brian Sudlow, Aston University

5pm Close of Conference followed by Conference dinner in Nottingham (details tbc)

ATTENDANCE IS FREE. BOOK YOUR PLACE HERE

For further information about the event please contact: sophie.fuggle@ntu.ac.uk

Subversive Festival In Zagreb. Talks 14.5 and 15.5 2014

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Here: Subversive

Vision Mix 13.5.2014

visionFace to face (201)) Gigi Scaria [Digital print on archival paper. Image courtesy of the artist]

 

VisionMix international artists’ and filmmakers’ network presents a screening of

“VisionMix Short Cuts” film, followed by a Roundtable.

 

When: 19.00 to 21.00, Tuesday 13th May 2014 

Where: SOAS, University of London, Old Building Khalili Lecture Theatre

Thornhaugh Street, Russell Square London, WC1H 0XGhttp://www.soas.ac.uk/visitors/location/maps/

http://www.soas.ac.uk/ssai/events/13may2014-visionmix-short-cuts.html

 

VisionMix is an international network of video and sound installation artists and documentary filmmakers whose members are based in Delhi, Kolkata, Mumbai and London. Launched in October 2013, VisionMix’s aim is to explore the agency of the artist in lens-based media projects that are acts of resistance, investigating the relationship between the social responsiveness of ‘documentary’ practices, video installation art and other audio/visual art forms. Whether dealing with issues of gender, environmental challenges, migration or issues around ‘marginality’, the ways in which these works mobilize audiences invites questions about the methods used in their production. VisionMix is also planning exhibition-screenings and symposia in the UK and in India in 2015-17.

The film, “VisionMix Short Cuts”  (55 minutes) showcases 12 artists and filmmakers from the India-based members of VisionMix, whose directors have contributed samples of their work, and are interviewed about their practise. These are: Atul Bhalla, Sheba Chhachhi, Ranbir Kaleka, Priyanka Chhabra, Anupama Srinivasan, Sameera Jain, Gigi Scaria, Asim Waqif, Paramita Das, Moutushi, Avijit Mukul Kishore and Kavita Joshi. VisionMix’s curator (and director of this anthology) Lucia King, is an artist-filmmaker and researcher of South Asian artists’ non-fiction film practices, and will contextualize the film after the screening.

The post-screening roundtable invites the UK-based VisionMix associates to explore how local predicaments and today’s art (and non-fiction film) industries are contributing to the artists assumed forms of public intervention, the themes and tactics used in these projects. VisionMix welcomes students, curators, art historians, industry professionals, researchers, filmmakers, artists and those interested in new media developments on an international stage, to join this discussion.

For more information: lucia@luciaking.co.uk

Subversive Festival, Zagreb – 13.5.14. and 15.5.14

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Book Launch Daya Thussu Communicating India’s Soft Power: Buddha to Bollywood

DayapicBOOK LAUNCH

 

Communicating India’s Soft Power: Buddha to Bollywood

Professor Daya Thussu

 

Date: Thursday 8 May 2014, 6:30 pm

Venue: Nehru Centre, 8 South Audley Street, London W1K 1HF
http://www.nehrucentre.org.uk/contact-us.html

 

As the world’s largest democracy with a vibrant and pluralist media system, India offers an excellent case study of the power of culture and communication in the age of mediated international relations. This pioneering attempt – the first book-length study of India’s Soft Power – from an international communication/media perspective, fills the existing gap in scholarship as well as policy literature in this area. The book, published by Palgrave/Macmillan in New York in their prestigious Global Public Diplomacy series, has been described by Professor Ashis Nandy as an ‘excellent, comprehensive yet brief survey of the scope and limits of India’s Soft Power and the country’s changing status in global public culture and media’.

Daya Thussu is Professor of International Communication and Co-Director of the India Media Centre at the University of Westminster in London.  Professor Thussu has a PhD in International Relations from Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi and he is the author or editor of 16 books and the founder and Managing Editor of the Sage journal Global Media and Communication.

The event will mark the formal launch of the book by Dr Virander Paul, Deputy High Commissioner of India in the UK, to be followed by a brief presentation about the book by the author and a discussion with Professor Lord Bhikhu Parekh about the issues raised in the book.

Amrit Wilson book launch 1 May 2014

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Silvia Federici “Caliban and the Witch”

Note for paper on co-constitution of colony and capital.

Federici describes witch hunting as a

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And

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Pantomime Terror on kindle £4.32, paperback from £6.50

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Stanley tools nuts and bolts

Reminded twice in the last days that my father worked at Stanley in Nunawading (the suburb now more famous for hosting Ramsay St, Neighbours TV show). I remember Xmas parties there and him bringing home bits and bobs of lathe-worked metal sometimes tools, but usually bolts or covers or other up identifiable shapes probably designs that came out wrong or excess. We had these as toys more than Lego. I was moved to look on the Stanley Co website, and see their colour scheme mains unchanged, but their sloganeering perhaps improved from the 1960s. Get the message.

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The Rumour of Calcutta

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Book Depository discounts on Hutnyk books

(some cheaper, some mad costly – dm me for deals)

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In the Name of the People

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The Royal African Society invites you to the launch of

In the Name of the People

Remembering Angola’s Forgotten Massacre: 27 May 1977 |Tuesday 20 May 2014, 7-8PM
Speakers: Lara Pawson, author; Ngola Nvunji, UK-based Angolan journalist and community activist; Keith Sommerville, lecturer, University of Kent. Chair: Mary Harper, Africa Editor, BBC.

On 27th May 1977, a small demonstration against the MPLA, the ruling party of Angola, led to the slaughter of thousands of people. These dreadful reprisals are little talked of in Angola today – and virtually unknown outside the country. In The Name of The People, journalist Lara Pawson’s new book, tracks down the story of what really happened in the aftermath of that fateful day. In a series of vivid encounters, she talks to eyewitnesses, victims and even perpetrators of the violent and confusing events of the 27th May and the following weeks and months. From London to Lisbon to Luanda, she meets those who continue to live in the shadow of the appalling events of 40 years ago and who – in most cases – have been too afraid to speak about them before. As well as shedding light on the events of 1977, the book contributes to a deeper understanding of modern Angola – its people and its politics. Join author Lara Pawson and a panel of experts to discuss the book and Angola’s past, present and future.

Date & Time: Tuesday 20 May 2014, 7-8PM

Venue: Brunei Suite, SOAS, WC1H 0XG

Register by clicking HERE

Film Screening and Bar Night

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from 7pm Friday 25th April

entry by donation, free popcorn and cheap drinks
hosted by Plan C London – all welcome
followed by a bar night and tunes

Finally Got the News (1970)
Produced in Association with the League of Revolutionary Black Workers
dir. Stewart Bird, Rene Lichtman, Peter Gessner, US, video, 55 min.

Finally Got the News is a forceful documentary that reveals the activities of the League of Revolutionary Black Workers inside and outside the auto factories of Detroit. Through interviews with the members of the movement, footage shot in the auto plants, and footage of leafleting and picketing actions, the film documents their efforts to build an independent black labor organisation that, unlike the UAW, will respond to worker’s problems, such as the assembly line speed-up and inadequate wages faced by both black and white workers in the industry.

Irene Fernandez

Tribute to Irene Fernandez

Press Statement
31 March 2014

Reference: Ms. Sarojeni Rengam, Executive Director, Pesticide Action Network Asia and the Pacific

Dr. Irene Fernandez (1946-2014):
A life full of meaning, dedicated to the people’s struggle

PENANG, Malaysia – The Pesticide Action Network Asia and the Pacific (PAN AP) is deeply saddened with the passing away of beloved and respected activist Dr. Irene Fernandez today.

“We grieve with Irene’s family, friends and comrades in the people’s struggle. Without a doubt, she will be a big loss not only to the movement in Malaysia but to the global movement that is striving for a just and better world for the poor and oppressed,” said Ms. Sarojeni Rengam, Executive Director of the Penang-based regional advocacy group.

Fernandez had been hospitalized for a week after suffering a massive heart attack. Days before that, Fernandez was still able to attend the annual Steering Council meeting of PAN AP, where she served as Chairperson. Fernandez was instrumental in setting up PAN AP as an independent regional network. She would have turned 68 years old on 18 April.

“But while we are grieving and hurt, let us also celebrate the life of Irene. A life that had been without a doubt full of meaning, a life that had been selflessly dedicated to the people’s aspiration to end injustice and oppression,” Rengam said.

“PAN AP will be forever grateful to Irene for her untiring guidance. With the help of her leadership and invaluable advice, we have been able to faithfully fulfill our commitment to serve the interests of small food producers, defend their rights, and advance their welfare. Words could not describe how much PAN AP will miss her and her insights that had firmly stood for the small farmers, agricultural workers, migrants, women, indigenous peoples and other marginalized sectors,” Rengam added.

Fernandez was a well-known human rights advocate and Director and co-founder of the Kuala Lumpur-based non-government group Tenaganita, which promotes the rights of migrant workers and other oppressed and poor people in Malaysia.

Fernandez was a teacher turned social activist, a commitment she resolutely held for almost four decades.

Aside from serving as the Executive Director of Tenaganita and Chairperson of PAN AP’s Steering Council, Fernandez was also a member of the respective Steering Committees of the Asian Rural Women’s Coalition (ARWC), the Coalition of Agricultural Workers International (CAWI), Asian Peasant Coalition (APC), and the People’s Coalition on Food Sovereignty (PCFS). She was also the Director of CARAM-Asia and the Vice Chairperson of the International Migrant Alliance (IMA).

In addition, Fernandez was among the founders of the Asia Pacific Forum on Women, Law and Development (APWLD) and a former executive member of the Committee on Asian Women, aside from helping establish various women and human rights organizations in Malaysia.

Fernandez had received numerous awards from various prestigious institutions in recognition of her work to stop violence against women and the abuses against migrant and poor workers including the Human Rights Watch Award in 1996; the Amnesty International Award in 1998; the International PEN Award in 2000; the Jonathan Mann Award in 2004; and the Right to Livelihood Award in 2005. She was also a recipient of an Honorary Doctorate in Social Medicine from the Vrije University in Amsterdam.

Because of her work, Fernandez herself had been a victim of the Malaysian government’s persecution. She went through a 13-year trial for writing a report that exposed the horrific conditions in immigration detention centers in Malaysia. She was convicted to a one-year imprisonment in 2003 but was released on bail, and appealed the decision to the High Court that eventually dropped the charges against her in 2008. ###

_________________________________________

Press Statement
31 March 2014

Reference: Ms. Sarojeni Rengam, Executive Director, Pesticide Action Network Asia and the Pacific (PAN AP)
E-mail: sarojeni.rengam@panap.net

Dr. Irene Fernandez (1946-2014):
A life full of meaning, dedicated to the people’s struggle

PENANG, Malaysia – The Pesticide Action Network Asia and the Pacific (PAN AP) is deeply saddened with the passing away of beloved and respected activist Dr. Irene Fernandez today.

“We grieve with Irene’s family, friends and comrades in the people’s struggle. Without a doubt, she will be a big loss not only to the movement in Malaysia but to the global movement that is striving for a just and better world for the poor and oppressed,” said Ms. Sarojeni Rengam, Executive Director of the Penang-based regional advocacy group.

Fernandez had been hospitalized for a week after suffering a massive heart attack. Days before that, Fernandez was still able to attend the annual Steering Council meeting of PAN AP, where she served as Chairperson. Fernandez was instrumental in setting up PAN AP as an independent regional network. She would have turned 68 years old on 18 April.

“But while we are grieving and hurt, let us also celebrate the life of Irene. A life that had been without a doubt full of meaning, a life that had been selflessly dedicated to the people’s aspiration to end injustice and oppression,” Rengam said.

“PAN AP will be forever grateful to Irene for her untiring guidance. With the help of her leadership and invaluable advice, we have been able to faithfully fulfill our commitment to serve the interests of small food producers, defend their rights, and advance their welfare. Words could not describe how much PAN AP will miss her and her insights that had firmly stood for the small farmers, agricultural workers, migrants, women, indigenous peoples and other marginalized sectors,” Rengam added.

Fernandez was a well-known human rights advocate and Director and co-founder of the Kuala Lumpur-based non-government group Tenaganita, which promotes the rights of migrant workers and other oppressed and poor people in Malaysia.

Fernandez was a teacher turned social activist, a commitment she resolutely held for almost four decades.

Aside from serving as the Executive Director of Tenaganita and Chairperson of PAN AP’s Steering Council, Fernandez was also a member of the respective Steering Committees of the Asian Rural Women’s Coalition (ARWC), the Coalition of Agricultural Workers International (CAWI), Asian Peasant Coalition (APC), and the People’s Coalition on Food Sovereignty (PCFS). She was also the Director of CARAM-Asia and the Vice Chairperson of the International Migrant Alliance (IMA).

In addition, Fernandez was among the founders of the Asia Pacific Forum on Women, Law and Development (APWLD) and a former executive member of the Committee on Asian Women, aside from helping establish various women and human rights organizations in Malaysia.

Fernandez had received numerous awards from various prestigious institutions in recognition of her work to stop violence against women and the abuses against migrant and poor workers including the Human Rights Watch Award in 1996; the Amnesty International Award in 1998; the International PEN Award in 2000; the Jonathan Mann Award in 2004; and the Right to Livelihood Award in 2005. She was also a recipient of an Honorary Doctorate in Social Medicine from the Vrije University in Amsterdam.

Because of her work, Fernandez herself had been a victim of the Malaysian government’s persecution. She went through a 13-year trial for writing a report that exposed the horrific conditions in immigration detention centers in Malaysia. She was convicted to a one-year imprisonment in 2003 but was released on bail, and appealed the decision to the High Court that eventually dropped the charges against her in 2008. ###

________________________________________

Pantomime Terror talk. RMIT 16.12.13

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The Squared Horizon – 6.6.2014 Nottingham Trent

The Squared Horizon: The Frames and Trajectories of Paul Virilio

Date: 6th June 2014, Nottingham Trent University, UK

In Desert Screen, Paul Virilio suggests the notion of a ‘squared horizon’ as a way of envisioning the interposition of the screen, multiple screens, in matters of war, conflict and international relations. Yet, the ‘squared horizon’ might also function as a starting point for bringing together the various frames and trajectories which make up Virilio’s oeuvre. The ‘squared horizon’ evokes the fragmented, pixelated existence of late capitalism, the perpetual dividing up of time into ever smaller units, the deferred, bracketed out future, put aside in favour of the instantaneous and immediate, the impact of urbanization with its grid systems and blocks on our experience of space, time and identity.

This conference invites papers around the theme of the ‘squared horizon’ as it might feasibly be applied to various aspects of Virilio’s work. It is hoped the event will bring together those using Virilio as a lens through which to read current socio-economic events, art, film, media and other forms of textual and visual representation as well as architecture and urbanism. At the same time, papers which place Virilio within a theoretical context in relation to interlocuteurs such as Baudrillard, Stiegler, Agamben, Bergson, Deleuze etc. are also welcomed.

A non-exhaustive list of potential topics:

  • Blocks of Time
  • Proximity, Distance, Depth
  • Deferred Futures
  • City Limits
  • The pixel
  • Screen Violence
  • Image-Maps
  • Frames and Trajectories
  • Proliferating Screens
  • Divided Selves
  • Conscience and the Senses

Please submit abstracts of no more than 250 words to sophie.fuggle@ntu.ac.uk and enda.mccaffrey@ntu.ac.uk by 28 February 2014.

Capital lectures in Spring term at Goldsmiths starting January 14

Marx Capital lecture course at Goldsmiths ✪

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Lecture course on Marx’s “Capital” at Goldsmiths: everybody is welcome

Capitalism and Cultural Studies – Prof John Hutnyk:

tuesday evenings from january 14, 2014 – 5pm-8pm Goldsmiths Room RHB 309. Free – all welcome.

No fee (unless, sorry, you are doing this for award) – and that, friends, is Willetts’ fault – though the Labour Party have a share of the blame too).

This course involves a close reading of Karl Marx’s Capital (Volume One).
90 minute lectures, 60 minutes discussion
The connections between cultural studies and critiques of capitalism are considered in an interdisciplinary context (cinema studies, anthropology, musicology, international relations, and philosophy) which reaches from Marx through to Film Studies, from ethnographic approaches to Heidegger, from anarchism and surrealism to German critical theory and poststructuralism/post-colonialism/post-early-for-christmas. Topics covered include: alienation, commodification, production, technology, education, subsumption, anti-imperialism, anti-war movement and complicity. Using a series of illustrative films (documentary and fiction) and key theoretical texts (read alongside the text of Capital), we examine contemporary capitalism as it shifts, changes, lurches through its very late 20th and early 21st century manifestations – we will look at how cultural studies copes with (or does not cope with) class struggle, anti-colonialism, new subjectivities, cultural politics, media, virtual and corporate worlds.
********** The weekly course reading guide is here: Cap and cult studs outline013 *************

The lectures/seminars begin on Tuesday 14th January 2014 between 5 and 8pm and will run for 11 weeks (with a week off in the middle) in the Richard Hoggart Building (Room 309), Goldsmiths College. You are required to bring their own copy of the Penguin, International Publishers/Progress Press of German editions of Karl Marx Capital Vol I. We are reading about 100 pages a week. (Please don’t get tricked into buying the abridged English edition/nonsense!)

Note: The Centre for Cultual Studies at Goldsmiths took a decision to make as many as possible of its lecture series open to the public without fee. Seminars, essays, library access etc remain for sale. Still, here is a chance to explore cultural studies without getting into debt. The classes are MA level, mostly in the day – though in spring the Capital course is early tuesday evening. We usually run 10 week courses. Reading required will be announced in class, but preliminary reading suggestions can also be found by following the links. RHB means main building of Goldsmiths – Richard Hoggart Building. More info on other free events from CCS here: http://hutnyk.wordpress.com/what-is-to-be-done/

Jai Bhim Comrade – Anand Patwardhan film – must see 14.11.13

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Bonfire night got a whole lot more interesting

bonfire of Austerity | 5 November 2013

Tomorrow (Tuesday 5th November) The Peoples’ Assembly is calling for a day of protest in every town and city in the country. The South East London People’s Assembly are hosting a ‘Bonfire of Cuts’ in Lewisham:

Bonfire of Cuts – 6pm @ Grassy Knoll opp. Lewisham DLR
-Bring effigies of politicians, bankers or the 1% to burn. Will be music, speakers and fire.

Procession against austerity, the bedroom tax and local
cuts – 4.30pm @ Catford Town Hall
-Bring placards or effigies for the route which will pass Lewisham Hospital, still under threat, and other key local places affected by the cuts on our way to the Bonfire.

Performance about austerity politics – 1.30pm @ Deptford Lounge Public Square

Action against poverty – 10am @ Deptford High Street/New Cross Road
-Led by the local food bank

Come to one or all of these acts of civil disobedience against austerity organised by the South East London People’s Assembly. All of them will be family friendly, and welcome participation from everyone.

Quid pro quo – talk at Melbourne Uni

“Quid pro quo’: Marx on India, from the Black Hole to the East of Capital”

John Hutnyk

The paper moves from re imagining Das Kapital if the book had been written at a major point of value extraction – Bengal – and follows this drift to the east up to the present day regeneration of the old East India Docks in London by a Chinese Corporation.

Venue: University of Melbourne, Friday 13 December 2013 (2pm-4 in the 4th floor common room John Medley Building)

paragoric

Abstract: My case is Marx writing on India, examining his theoretical and journalistic work together, each informed by an emergent anthropology, by historical hermeneutics, by a critique of political economy and by attention to a political contest that mattered more than philosophy. Marx reading history, already against the grain and without being able to make actual alliances, is nevertheless seeking allies in a revolutionary cause. Is it possible to observe Marx coming round to realise, after the shaping experience of the 1848-1852 European uprisings, the possibilities for the many different workers of the world to unite? I consider the sources Marx finds available, what he reads, and how his writing practice parses critical support as habitual politics, and how far subcontinental events, themes and allegories are a presence in the key moves of his masterwork Capital almost as if India were a refocussed bromide for Europe, just as slavery is for wages. I will take up four cases – the ‘founding’ of Calcutta by Job Charnock (disputed); the story of Clive sacking Chandernagor and going on to defeat Suraj-ud-duala at Palashi/Plassey in 1757 in retaliation for the ‘Black Hole’ (did it exist?); Disraeli verbosely saying nothing about the so-called Indian ‘mutiny’ 1857 (‘the East as a career’); and the question of legalizing Opium in China and the advent of Matheson-Jardine Company after the East India Company comes to an end (‘quid pro quo’). A coda returns us to London and the redevelopment of the old EIC shipyards in Deptford, returning Capital to the capital.

Inaugural Meeting of South East London Council for the Defence of British Universities:

Wednesday (6th November 2013), a meeting to start a South East London Group Council for the Defence of British Universities-Campaign for the Public University SE London Group will take place in Greenwich. The meeting is entitled ‘Greenwich and Goldsmiths in the market’ and will be at Maritime Greenwich (Queen Anne Building Room165) from 2-5pm.

Speakers include:
Patrick Ainley, Greenwich and co-author The Great Reversal, Education and Employment in a Moribund Economy: Comparing two universities in the market.
Des Freedman, Secretary Goldsmiths’ UCU and co-author The Assault on Universities, A Manifesto for Resistance: Resistance to the assault on the universities.
 

talk at RMIT Melbourne

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John Hutnyk
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Pantomime Terror: MIA’s lyrical opposition to Capital, Google and the Border Patrols.

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Monday 16 December 2013 4:30PM (room tbc)

Within the prevailing ‘keep calm and carry on’ conditions of the UK security regime, those who find safety in repressive complicity are also necessarily disabled from criticism of the war-effect as it appears everywhere. At best this turns anti-war opposition into performance, staged protest and the lyricism of music, song, drum and video. In this talk I examine the culture-inflected, low-intensity war alongside the shooting war. The video provocations of artists like M.I.A. (Mathangi Arulpragasam) can be read as dramatising difficulties that have occupied British South Asian musicians, writers, filmmakers and commentators in the context of a domestic civil liberties crackdown that replicates detention and terror security repression elsewhere.

talk is on the same day as one by Sophie Fuggle…

Flyers with room details:

GRC Seminar John Hutnyk 161213

GRC Seminar Sophie Fuggle 161213

 

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