Monthly Archives: January 2013

John Hutnyk’s Publications

For the record… A drab day, in which I have been consigned to routine tasks, like updating my publications list. Gets a little sketchy towards the end because I cannot be listing all the small mags stuff (some of this can be downloaded link to the left, others I’d have to send you, still others need to be scanned by the oompa-loompas one day soon)…

Books (single authored)

1996     The Rumour of Calcutta: Tourism, Charity and the Poverty of Representation. Zed Books, London. ISBN 18649408X

2000     Critique of Exotica: Music, Politics and the Culture Industry London: Pluto Press ISBN 0 7453 1597 6

2004     Bad Marxism: Capitalism and Cultural Studies London: Pluto Press, ISBN0-7453-2266-2

Books (co-authored)

2005  Hybridity and Diaspora, (With Raminder Kaur and Virinder Kalra) London: Sage. ISBN 0-7619-7397-4

Edited books:

1996     Dis-orienting Rhythms: The Politics of the New Asian Dance Music (co-edited with Sanjay Sharma and Ashwani Sharma). Zed Books, London. ISBN 1856494705

1999 Travel Worlds: Journeys in Contemporary Cultural Politics London, (co-edited with Raminder Kaur) Zed books. ISBN 1856495620

2006     Celebrating Transgression: Method and Politics in Anthropology (with Ursula Rao) Oxford: Berghahn. ISBN 1-84545-025-6

2012 Beyond Borders London: Pavement Books ISBN: 978-0-9571470-0-3

Edited Journals:

1987 Melbourne Journal of Politics (with Nick Lane), Department of Political Science, University of Melbourne

1987-1988 Criticism, Heresy and Interpretation – Journal of the Department of Anthropology, University of Melbourne – 3 volumes as editor in chief.

1991  The Consuming Subjects of Education. La Trobe University Education Research Journal

1998  special issue – Postcolonial Studies Vol 1 No 3 – ‘Diasporic Music and politics’. ISSN No. 1368-8790

2000 special issue – Theory, Culture and Society vol 17 (3) – ‘Music and Politics’ ISSN 0263-2763

2005 special section PubliCity in the journal Left Curve USA –  a samizdat style insert in this journal containing 30 articles from 19 different countries.

2006 ‘Problematising Global Knowledge, special issue (2 volumes) Theory Culture and Society Vol 23 (2-3) ISSN 0263-2764

2007 the second special section PubliCity in the journal Left Curve USA –  a samizdat style insert in this journal containing 12 articles from 9 different countries.

Book Contributions

1991   ‘Strategy, Identity, Writing: An interview with Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak’, in Sarah Harasym (ed), The Post-Colonial Critic, (USA) Routledge, New York, pp 35-49. ISBN 0415901707

1996   ‘Introduction’ (with Sanjay Sharma and Ashwani Sharma) in Sanjay Sharma, John Hutnyk and Ashwani Sharma (eds) Dis-orienting Rhythms: The Politics of the New Asian Dance Music Zed Books, London, pp 1-14. ISBN 1856494705

1996 ‘Re-Sounding (Anti)Racism, or Concordant Politics? Revolutionary Antecedents’ (with Virinder Kalra and Sanjay Sharma) in Sanjay Sharma, John Hutnyk and Ashwani Sharma (eds) Dis-orienting Rhythms: The Politics of the New Asian Dance Music Zed Books, London. pp 127-155. ISBN 1856494705

1996 ‘Repetitive Beatings or Criminal Justice?’ in Sanjay Sharma, John Hutnyk and Ashwani Sharma (eds) Dis-orienting Rhythms: The Politics of the New Asian Dance Music Zed Books, London, pp 156-189. ISBN 1856494705

1997 ‘Adorno at Womad: South Asian Crossovers and the Limits of Hybridity-talk’ forthcoming in Werbner, P and Modood, T. (eds.) Debating Cultural Hybridity: Multi-Cultural Identities and the Politics of Anti-Racism, London, Zed books, pp 106-136. ISBN 1856494241.

1999      ‘Argonauts of Western Pessimism: Clifford’s Malinowski’ in Steve Clarke (ed) Travel Writing and Empire: Postcolonial Theory in Transit, London: Zed books pp 45-62. ISBN 1856496287

1999   ‘Introduction’ (with Raminder Kaur) in Raminder Kaur and John Hutnyk (eds) Travel Worlds: Journeys in Contemorary Cultural Politics London, Zed books pp 1-13. ISBN 1856495620

1999 ‘Magical Mystical Tourism’ in Raminder Kaur and John Hutnyk (eds) Travel Worlds: Journeys in Contemorary Cultural Politics London, Zed books pp 94-119. ISBN 1856495620

1999 ‘Semifeudal Cybercolonialism: Technocratic Dreamtime in Malaysia’ in Bosma, J et al (eds.) Readme! Filtered by Nettime: Ascii Culture and the Revenge of Knowledge New York: Autonomedia,. pp 315-321

2000 ‘Capital Calcutta: Coins, Maps, Monuments, Souvenirs and Tourism’ in Bell, D and Haddour, A (eds) City Visions Longman ISBN: 0582327415

2003 ‘Musik für Euro-Maoisten: Über die richtige Behandlung der Widersprüche bei Pop-stars’ in Kunstwerk und Kritik, Jour Fixe Initiative Berling (hg), Munster: Unrast-Verlag pp 111-143

2006   ‘The Dialectics of Here and There: British Asian Communism’ in Ali, Kalra and Sayyid (Eds) A Postcolonial People, Hurst, ISBN: 1850657963

2006 ‘Deathening Silence: The Terms of (Non) Political Commentary’ Basu, D and Lamelle S Eds The Vinyl Ain’t Final: Hip-hop and the Globalisation of Black Popular Culture London: Pluto Press ISBN 978-0745319407

2008 ‘Martin Heidegger Goes to the Movies’ in David Held and Henrietta Moore eds., Culturl Politics in a Global Age: Uncertainty, Solidarity and Innovation, Oxford: One World 112-120 ISBN: 978-1-85168-550-9

2008 ‘Tourism and the Selling of Cultures’ in Robin Anderson and Jonathan Gray eds., Battleground: the Media (2 Vold) vol 2 Westport: Greenwood Press: 513-519 ISBN 978-0-313-34169-4

2009 ‘Translating Appearance: On the First Sentence of Das Kapital’ in Tom Bunyard ed., The Devils Party London CCS pp50-54 ISBN 978-1-4452-1822-9

2010 ‘Hybridity’ in Kim Knott and Sean McLaughlin Diasporas: Concepts, Intersections, Identities London Zed books pp59-62 ISBN 978-1-84277-948-4

2010 (with Laura King) ‘The Eighteenth Brumaire of Gaius Baltar: Colonialism Reimagined in Battlestar Gallactica’ in Arlo Kemp fed., Breaching the Colonial Contract  Springer pp237-250 ISBN978-90-481-3888-3

2011 ‘Pantomime paranoia in London or, ‘lookout he’s behind you!’’ in Peddie (ed) Popular Music and Human Rights, Volume I: British and American Music, London: Ashgate

2011 ‘Undercover Transports’ in Menrath and Schwinghammer eds What Does a Chameleon Look Like? Topographies of Immersion, Cologne: Herbert Von Halem Verlag.

2011 ‘NDTV 24X7, the Hanging Channel: News Media or Horror Show’ in Batabyal, Chowdhry, Gaur et al Indian Mass Media and the Politics of Change, London: Routledge.

2011 ‘Critica de tudo’ in Tatiana Amendola Sanches ed., Estudos Culturais uma abordagem pratica Sao Paulo: Editora Senac pp99-209 ISBN 978-85-396-0141-7

Refereed Papers:

1987 ’The Authority of Style’, Social Analysis, 21:59-79. ISBN 0133977X

1988 ‘Castaway Anthropology: Malinowski’s Tropical Writings’ Antithesis, 2(1):43-56. ISSN 10303839.

1989 ‘Customs Review of Public Culture; The U.S. and Africa in Melbourne’ Public Culture 2(1)Fall: 130-136. ISSN 08992363

1989 ‘Clifford Geertz as a Cultural System’ Social Analysis 25:91-119. ISBN 0133977X

1990 ‘Comparative Anthropology and Evans-Pritchard’s African Photography’ Critique of Anthropology 10(1):81-102

1992 ‘Cinematic Calcutta: Camera Angles on the City’ Agenda Special issue, Dec:68-72 ISSN 10331115

1992  ‘Articulation and Marginalia: Making Spaces for Other Voices in Our Institutions’ New Literatures Review Winter-South:104-116. ISSN 03147495

1993  ‘Calcutta Cipher: travellers and the city’ Social Analysis 32:53-65. ISBN 0133977X

1993  ‘Noir Sociology: Can Academics Map Los Angeles’ Left Curve 17:26-33. ISSN 01601857

1994 ‘Thinking With Berger: Local/Global and Dialogue in Modernity As Exile by Nikos Papastergiadis’, New Literatures Review, 27: 91-103. ISSN 03147495

1996 ‘Media, Research, Politics, Culture’ Critique of Anthropology 16(4):417-428. ISSN 0308275X

1997   (with Virinder Kalra and Sanjay Sharma) ‘Fun^Da^Mental Politics: the New Asian Dance Music and its Revolutionary Antecedents’ Left Curve 21:54-64. ISSN 01601857

1997 ‘derrida@marx.archive’ Space and Culture 2:95-122. ISSN 12063312

1998 (with Virinder Kalra) ‘Music and Politics – introduction to the special section’ Postcolonial Studies, 1(3):335-37. ISSN No. 1368-8790

1998 (with Virinder Kalra) ‘Brimful of Agitation, Appropriation and Authenticity: Madonna’s “Asian Kool”‘ in Postcolonial Studies, 1(3):339-355. ISSN 1368-8790

1998 ‘Clifford’s Ethnographica’ Critique of Anthropology 18(4):339-378. ISSN 0308-275X

1998  ‘Adorno at Womad: South Asian Crossovers and the Limits of Hybridity-talk’ Postcolonial Studies, 1(3):401-426. ISSN 1368-8790

1999  ‘Resettling Bakun: Consultancy, Anthropologists and Development’ Left Curve 23:82-90. ISSN 0160-1857

2000 ‘Hybridity Saves: Authenticity and/or the Critique of Appropriation’ in Amer-Asia 25(3):39-58 ISSN 0044-7471

2000 (with Sanjay Sharma) ‘Music and Politics: Introduction to the Special Section’ in Theory Culture and Society 17(3):57-65 ISSN 0263-2763

2000 ‘Music for Euro-Maoists: On the Correct Handling of Contradictions Among Popstars’ in Theory Culture and Society 17(3):141-163 ISSN 0263-2763

2002 ‘Jungle Studies – the State of Anthropology’ in Futures 34(1):15-31 ISSN 0016-3287/01

2002    Tales from the Raj’ in Rethinking Marxism, vol. 13(3-4):119-136, ISSN 0893-5696.

2003 ‘Bataille’s Wars: Surrealism, Marxism, Fascism’ Critique of Anthropology, 23(3):264-288 ISSN 0308-275X

2004 ‘The Chapati Story: How Hybridity as Theory displaced Maoism as Politics in Subaltern Studies’ Contemporary South Asia 12(4)481-491 ISSN 0958-4935

2004 ‘Photogenic Poverty: Souvenirs and Infantilism’ Journal of Visual Culture, 3(1):77-94 ISSN 1470-4129

2005  ‘The Dialectics of European Hip-Hop: Fun^da^mental and the Deathening Silence’ South Asian Popular Culture 3(1):17-32 ISSN 1474-6689

2005   ‘Hybridity’ Ethnic and Racial Studies 28(1):79-102, ISSN 0141-9870

2005 ‘Panoramas of Asia and the Electronic Hearth: Michael Palin’s Connection’ Journal of the Moving Image 4(Nov):32-62

2006 ‘The Dialectic of Here and There: Anthropology ‘At Home’ and British Asian Communism’ Social Identities 11(4):345-361 ISSN 1350-4630

2006 ‘Culture’ main entry for culture section in Theory Culture and Society Vol. 23(2–3): 351–375 23 ISSN 0263-2764

2007. Pantomime Terror Diasporic Music in a Time of War. Journal of Creative Communications, 2(1-2), pp. 123-141.

2011 ‘Critique of Everything’ in Soumen Antropologi: Journal of the Finnish Anthropological Society 36(3)71-75

2012 ‘Beyond Television Studies’ Rountable essay in South Asian History and Culture 3(4):583-590

2012 ‘Sexy Sammie and Red Rosie’? From Burning Books to the War on Terror’, Space and Culture 15.2, pp164-176

2012 ‘Poetry After Guantanamo: M.I.A.’ Social Identities 18.5, pp. 555-572

2012 ‘Contexts for Distraction’ Journal For Cultural Research (Special issue on the August 2011 uprisings in London). DOI:10.1080/14797585.2012.756248

2013 ‘Proletarianization’ in New Formations (special issue on Bernard Stiegler)

other publications, review essays and conference proceedings, magazines etc.

1986 (journal article) ‘Go Tell it on the Mountain: Politics and Knowledge in Ethnography’, Melbourne Journal of Politics, 18:126-141.

1988 (journal article) ‘Lévi-Strauss as a Cultural System: Geertz’s Chapter on Tristes Tropiques’ Criticism, Heresy and Interpretation, vol. 1, No. 1.

1989 (journal article) ‘The Third Body: Black Art on (Re)View in London’ Criticism, Heresy and Interpretation vol. 3

1990 (conference papers) ‘Introductory Essay’ The Consuming Subjects of Education La Trobe.

1992 (journal article) ‘Photogenic Calcutta- Instamatic Anthropology’ In Media (India) July.

1992 (journal article) ‘Writing for the Space Cadets: reviewing the urban west’ Melbourne Journal of Politics 21:151-167

1992 (conference publication) ‘Value for Money: Giving the $ign to the Bourgeoisie’ IIR Higher Education Summit, Sydney, Australia.

1993 (conference publication) ‘Photogenic Calcutta’ in Postmodern Cities, University of Sydney Department of Architecture and Urban Design.

1993 (conference publication) ‘Technological Dreamtime: the advanced technology park for Redfern’ in Postmodern Cities University of Sydney Department of Architecture and Urban Design.

1994 (conference review) ‘African Research Futures: Post-Colonialism and Identity’ Anthropology Today 10(4):24-25.

1995 (journal article) ‘Writing Calcutta: Travelling with Lévi-Strauss and Gunter Grass’ Kolkata 2000, (India) June pp 31-47.

1996 (Web E-Journal) Review of Bill Martin Humanism and its Aftermath: The Shared Fate of Deconstruction and Politics New Jersey, Humanities Press 1995 in Sociological Research Online 1(4) <www.socresonline.org.uk/1/4/hutnyk.html>

1996 (book review) Martin Stokes (ed) 1994 Ethnicity, Identity and Music: The Musical Construction of Place, Anthropological Notebooks: (Društvo Anthropologov Slovenije) 11(1)146-148.

1997 (occasional paper) ‘derrida@marx.archive’  Manchester Papers in Social Anthropology No 6, 49pages

1997 (book review) Les Back 1996 New Ethnicities and Urban Culture: racisms and multiculture in young lives, Sociological Review, 45(1)

1997 (book review) Cohen, 1996 Cambridge Survey of World Migration in Race and Class, Vol 38, N0 3

1997 (book review) Spivak 1996 The Spivak Reader in Self, Agency and Society 1(2):178-180.

1998 (book review) Ang 1996 Living Room Wars: Rethinking Media Audiences for a Postmodern World in Sociological Review 46(3):594-598.

1999 (web E-journal article, with Anna Har) ‘Languid, tropical, monsoonal time?: net-activism and hype in the context of South East Asian politics’ in SASKI No. 6. http://www.saksi.com/jul99/huynyk.htm

2000 (web E-Journal article) ‘Culture Move: On Asian Dub Foundation’ in Ghadar: the Forum of Indian Leftists 4(1), May 1 2000 www.proxsa.org/resources/ghadar/v4n1/edit.html

2000 ‘Complicity’ catalogue essay for ‘Assembly’ RCA/Goldsmiths

2000 (debate publication) ‘The Right to Difference is a Fundamental Human Right: Against the Motion’ contribution to GDAT debate No 10, with Corry, S, Jean-Klein, I, Wilson, R, ed Wade, P. The Right to Difference is a Fundamental Human Right University of Manchester, pp40-52 ISBN 0-9527837-3-8. Reprinted in Left Curve No 23, 2001

2001 (journal article in translation) ‘Dog-Tribe’ – Swedish translation of a chapter from Critique of Exotica in  Glanta 3. 2001.

2001 (Magazine article, with Virinder Kalra), ‘Postcolonial London’ Seminar, (India).

2005 (journal report) ‘Show Neon Fashion’ – Left Curve ‘Publicity’ section article. Volume 29: 106-107. (California)

2005 (Encyclopaedia entry) ‘Calcutta’ in Vinay Lal and Ashis Nandy eds The Future of Knowledge and Culture New Delhi: Penguin pp 20-25 ISBN 0-67-005813-0

2007 (Magazine article) ‘The politics of Cats’ in Stimulus Respond – e-journal – http://www.stimulusrespond.com

2010  Catalogue essay for Steel Sculptures – Sokari Douglas Camp, London: Douglas Camp Pubs

forthcoming books:

2013 Pantomime Terror: Diasporic Music and the Politics of Fear. 60,000 monograph,with Zero

2013-14 Colour TV: B&W Life, 45,000 word monograph on culture and film.

2013 Communists Must Write 80,000 word book of essays with Minor Compositions

2013 (?) Trinketization

2014 (?) Capital and Film

Silvia Federici at Goldsmiths

from the dextrous camera trigger/edit digits of Kevin Molin and NyX: a Nocturnal in the Centre for Cultural Studies, this:

Screen shot 2013-01-30 at 06.48.45

Towards a New Cultural Cartography 26.1.2013 Tate Modern

Towards a New Cultural Cartography: A panel discussion about Sharjah Biennial 11

Wael Shawky, film still from Cabaret Crusades: The Path to Cairo, 2012© Courtesy the artist and Sfeir-Semler Gallery

Wael Shawky, film still from Cabaret Crusades: The Path to Cairo, 2012
© Courtesy the artist and Sfeir-Semler Gallery

Tate Modern, Starr Auditorium Saturday 26 January 2013, 14.00 – 17.00

In the lead-up to the 11th Sharjah Biennial, Tate Modern hosts a preview panel discussion including Yuko Hasegawa, this year’s curator, and Hoor Al-Qasimi, President of the Sharjah Art Foundation.

For this year’s Biennial, which will run from March and to May 2013, Hasegawa proposes ‘a selection of artworks that reassess the Westerncentrism of knowledge in modern times’. Starting from the metaphor of the courtyard in Islamic architecture, her project focuses on exploring the complexity and diversity of cultures, societies and politics. She calls for a gathering of architects, designers, creators and artists, who will bring together different perspectives and challenge viewers to seek new knowledge by sharing ideas. In holding a preview debate in London, Tate and The Sharjah Art Foundation open the floor to important questions about international contemporary art that are often simplified, subsumed or ignored. Wael Shawky, one of the participating artists, will talk about his work in relation to transregional politics, religion and history. Sarat Maharaj and John Hutnyk will explore the notion of ‘new cartographies’, which Hasegawa considers crucial to our understanding of the complexities of global developments in art.

14.00 Welcome: Marko Daniel

14.10 Hoor Al-Quasimi: The Sharjah Biennial

14.20 Yuko Hasegawa: The Courtyard and New Cartographies

14.45 Wael Shawky: Participating artist’s presentation

15.10 Comfort Break

15.20 Sarat Maharaj & John Hutnyk in conversation

15.50 Group Panel Hoor Al-Quasimi, Yuko Hasegawa, Wael Shawky, Sarat Maharaj, John Hutnyk and Marko Daniel (chair)

16.35 Q&A

16.50 Conclusion

Speakers

Sheikha Hoor Al-Qasimi, President and Director of the Sharjah Art Foundation, is a practicing artist who received her BFA from the Slade School of Fine Art, London (2002), a Diploma in Painting from the Royal Academy of Arts (2005) and an MA in Curating Contemporary Art from the Royal College of Art, London (2008). She is Chair of the Advisory Board for the College of Art and Design, University of Sharjah, Member of Advisory Board, Khoj International Artists’ Association, India, and serves on the Board of Directors for MoMA PS1, New York, and Ashkal Alwan, Beirut. She was on the curatorial selection committee for the 2012 Berlin Biennale and is a Visiting Lecturer at Slade School of Fine Art, London. Her recent curatorial projects include Drift—an exploration of urban and suburban landscapes (2011), and In Spite of it All (2012). A solo exhibition of her photographic work Off Road opened recently at the Nevada Museum of Art, Reno. Marko Daniel is Convenor of Adult Programmes, Tate.

Yuko Hasegawa, Curator, Sharjah Biennial 11, is Chief Curator of the Museum of Contemporary Art, Tokyo (2006–present) and is also a Professor at Tama Art University, Tokyo, where she teaches curatorial and art theory. Previously, she was Chief Curator and Founding Artistic Director of the 21st Century Museum of Contemporary Art, Kanazawa (1999−2006). Hasegawa has worked on many international biennials, and has held such positions as: Artistic Advisor of the 12th Venice Architectural Biennale (2010), Co-Curator of the 29th Sao Paulo Biennale (2010), and Co-Curator of the 4th Seoul International Media Art Biennale (2006). Artistic Director of the 7th Istanbul Biennale (2001), Hasegawa has curated major thematic group exhibitions, and solo exhibitions by such artists as Matthew Barney, Marlene Dumas, Rebecca Horn, and Atsuko Tanaka. She has served on advisory boards for Asian Art Council of the Guggenheim Museum, and has authored curatorial essays in publications for museums including The Museum of Modern Art (MoMA).

Professor John Hutnyk is Academic Director of Cultural Studies at Goldsmiths, University of London. He has written three single authored monographs (1996, 2000, 2004) each often reviewed and cited, and marking distinct research areas: urban studies, music, cultural theory. One co-authored book (Diaspora and Hybridity 2005) and three edited book collections (1996, 1999, Jan 2006), each making openings for new research. Current research interests include: revolutionary movements, especially South Asia; global knowledge production and the history of ideas, trinkets, archives and collections; architectural style and urbanization; trade routes, ports and the administration of commercial(ized) lives with multiple ‘locations’ (co-constitution and triangulation of sites); history of work and technology, especially with regard to mode of production debates; illicit trade and ‘piracy’ as catalyst for neo-liberal incursion; the politics of prisons and confinement.

Sarat Maharaj is a writer, researcher, curator, and professor. He is an authority on the work of Richard Hamilton, Marcel Duchamp, and James Joyce. He is a Professor of Visual Arts and Knowledge Systems at the Malmö Art Academy at Lund University in Sweden and was Professor of Art and Art Theory at Goldsmiths College, London from 1980 to 2005. Maharaj has held visiting professorships and fellowships at several institutions including Jan Van Eyck Academie, Maastricht and Humboldt University, Berlin. His writings, curatorial projects, and presentations have appeared all over the world. Maharaj is also a member of the advisory board of the journal Third Text.

Wael Shawky is an artist and filmmaker living and working in Alexandria, and a participant artist in Sharjah Biennial 11. Shawky’s work seeks to challenge commonly held assumptions about regional politics, history and religion through the complex interaction of narrative and imagery that investigate concepts of modernity, cultural identity and hybridity.

 

Tickets here

 

GEORGE CAFFENTZIS PUBLIC LECTURE Thursday 31 Jan 2013 (note new time and date)

The making of a debt resistors’ movement: From Occupy Wall Street to Strike Debt //

The financial crisis in the US officially began in September 2008, but the
first mass street response arose in September 2011 with the Occupy Wall
Street movement. Since then Strike Debt, a debt resistors’ organization,
emerged out of Occupy. George Caffentzis will discuss debt resistance as a
working class project and the prospects of Strike Debt in the context of
previous debt resistance movements.

// TIME AND DATE CHANGE // 


Apologies for any inconvenience (please forward and share to help spread the word) – due to circumstances beyond our control and very much in the control of multi-national airlines, please be advised of
 
- NEW TIME AND DATE FOR GEORGE CAFFENTZIS PUBLIC LECTURE – 
 
THURSDAY 31st JAN
TIME: 6:30pm
VENUE: NEW ACADEMIC BUILDING, LG01
GOLDSMITHS COLLEGE

*This event is organised in collaboration with the Centre for Cultural
Studies <http://www.gold.ac.uk/cultural-studies/>, PM
Press<http://www.pmpress.org>and Common
Notions <http://commonnotions.org/>. *

*George Caffentzis* is a Professor of Philosophy at the University of
Southern Maine. He was a founding member of the Midnight Notes
Collective<http://www.midnightnotes.org/> and
coordinator of the Committee for Academic Freedom in Africa. He is the
author and editor of many books and articles, his latest is *In Letters of
Blood and Fire**: Work, Machines and the Crisis of Capitalism* (PM Press:
Feb 2013)

*Special Offer at the Public Lecture*: pre-order your copy of *In Letters
of Blood and Fire: Work, Machines, and
Value<https://secure.pmpress.org/index.php?l=product_detail&p=424>(Feb
2013, PM Press)
*by* *George Caffentzis and receive 20 % off and free postage.

*In Letters of Blood and Fire:*
Karl Marx remarked that the only way to write about the origins of
capitalism is in the letters of blood and fire used to drive workers from
the common lands, forests, and waters in the sixteenth century. In this
collection of essays, George Caffentzis argues that the same is true for
the annals of twenty-first-century capitalism. Information technology,
immaterial production, financialization, and globalization have been
trumpeted as inaugurating a new phase of capitalism that puts it beyond its
violent origins. Instead of being a period of major social and economic
novelty, however, the course of recent decades has been a return to the
fire and blood of struggles at the advent of capitalism.

For media, review copies or event enquires please contact Camille
Barbagallo camille [at] pmpress.org


Camille Barbagallo

PM Press
BM Box 5239
London WC1N 3XX
+44 (0)7981070417 | +44 (0) 203 222 5130
www.pmpress.org


PO Box 23912
Oakland CA 94623
+ 1 510 – 658 – 3906
info[at]pmpress.org

Border Films and Discussion once a month on sundays at Museum of London Docklands (free) from 24.2.2013

Screen shot 2013-01-21 at 15.09.07

24 Feb: Short Film Nite – four short films about the border
A screening of the films Performing The Border (1999) and Europlex (2003) by Ursula Biemann. In these two short films, Biemann tracks the activities that enact the border. In the first, we see the feminisation of the border in Ciudad Juarez, Mexico and in the second the repeated crossings that link Europe and Africa. Also a screening and discussion with filmmaker Tim Travers Hawkins, creator of 1000 Voices (2009) an animated film featuring answer phone messages from people held in a detention centre in the UK, and Surpriseville (2010) a documentary about the gated community residents of Surprise, Arizona and their attempts to make themselves as safe as possible.
 
17 March: The Nine Muses - John Akomfrah – 2010 
Akomfrah offers an existentialist rumination on the experience of migration to post-war Britain in this docu-essay that intertwines archival images and original footage shot in Alaska; accompanied by voice-over readings of texts by Shakespeare, Beckett, Milton and Nietzsche, and music by Schubert, Wagner and Arvo Part.
 
21 April: Ghosts - Nick Broomfield – 2006
Based on the true story of the Morcambe Bay cockle-picking disaster of 2004, this film follows Chinese undocumented immigrant Ai Qin to Europe and reveals the dangerous exploitation of migrant labour in the UK.
 
26 May: The Three Burials of Melquiades Estrada – Tommy Lee Jones – 2005
Tommy Lee Jones’ directorial debut is a story of friendship, vengence, and one man’s commitment to fulfill a promise for his friend that sees him crossing the Rio Grande pursued by police and Border Patrol.
 
23 June: In This World – Michael Winterbottom – 2002
Using small handheld digital video cameras and non-professional actors, this semi-fictional docu-drama tracks two asylum seekers on their journey from a refugee camp in Peshawar to the UK, following the “silk road” through Pakistan, Iran and Turkey towards London.
 
21 July: District 9 – Neill Blomkamp – 2009
A camp in Johannesburg, South Africa is the setting of this science fiction body-horror drama in which an alien population of refugees is faced with eviction from the militarized ghetto where they are confined and exploited.
(with thanks to Rachel Palmer, Leila Whitley, and Maria Jose Pantoja who will, (variously/sometimes vicariously), be in discussion with John Hutnyk after the screenings).

Gradgrind – for Girl No 20

photonote to self: on the origins of Mr Gradgrind

 

Russian Fairytale at Doc House. (riverside 31 jan 2013)

Screen shot 2013-01-16 at 11.08.11

I am Fiction 17 Jan 2013 (London Art Fair)

Film Programme 2
Thursday 17th January only

7pm: Premier as part of Thursday Late – Max Kestner & Thomas Altheimer, ‘I am Fiction’ (2012), 82 minutes. Courtesy of Alma Enterprises (part of A.L.I.S.N., stand P29)

Reality, art performance or publicity stunt? Few people could make head or tails of the lawsuit that Thomas Altheimer (aka Thomas Skade-Rasmussen Strøbech) raised against fellow artist Claus Beck-Nielsen (aka Das Beckwerk) and the Gyldendal publishing house in 2009 for publishing the novel The Sovereign, which described Altheimer’s private life in meticulous detail.

But on the initiative of the director Max Kestner, Altheimer started to film himself during the two-year trial that followed. Amidst a vortex of confrontations, dashes to America, changing lawyers and empty vodka bottles, there is no doubt in Altheimer’s mind that he has been robbed of his identity…

http://www.londonartfair.co.uk/page.cfm/Link=6/t=m/goSection=28

 

Where’s Friday?

I have started to gather my notes for the next lecture on Marx tomorrow. Here is what I had last year on Robinson. To which I hope to add some more this evening…

Spivak uses the occasion of Derrida saying ‘hello to Marx’ (Spivak 1995:78) to make some key points about women in the contemporary condition of financialised capitalism, and offer a reading of Assia Djebar’s Far From Medina and the ghosts of many women that must be retrieved from this text on Islam. I am not able to engage with Fatima, like Spivak I am ‘no Islamic scholar’, and anyway you must read both Spivak and Djebar. I also consider Spivak more interesting on finacialisation and women than anyone else writing on this. It is curious that few Marxists take this up, as class conscious ‘future socialists’ we cannot ignore the need to work through such questions, as we shall. Spivak insists:

‘According, then, to the strictest Marxian sense, the reproductive body of woman has now been “socialized” – computed into average abstract labor and thus released into what I call the spectrality of reason – a specter that haunts the merely empirical, dislocating it from itself. According to Marx, this is the specter that must haunt the daily life of the class-conscious worker, the future socialist, so that she can dislocate him herself into the counterintuitive average part-subject (agent) of labor, recognize that, in the everyday, es spukt. It is only then that the fetish character of labor-power as commodity can be grasped and can become the pivot that wrenches capitalism into socialism’ (Spivak 1995:67-8)

In Capital, the tale of Robinson is used to show that the operations of use-value are not somehow prior or isolated from exchange as relations of production. Even alone, Robinson calculates. It is not an innate nature, but a social condition (that can be changed).

‘The first example is Robinson Crusoe, to demonstrate that the relations of production can be known even in a situation of “pure” use-value’ (Spivak 1995:76)

Immediately before this, in search of Ghosts, Derrida finds that the translation occludes the literal ghost in referring to the ‘magic and necromancy that surrounds the products of labour so long as they take the form of commodities’ (Marx 1867/1970:76 L&W Pen-169, Derrida 1993/1994:164). Necromancy substitutes for spuk and Derrida wants to stress the apparition, that the ghost is something like Marx’s familiar, that he wants to exorcise and retain.

But Spivak notes that Derrida ‘goofs a bit’ here:

‘the passage quoted on page 164 [by Derrida] does not directly refer to the socialist future, as Derrida seems to think. Marx’s point is that simply to see the relations of production clearly is no big deal’ (Spivak 1995:76)

It may be worth thinking through whyo the charaters are here, and who appears on stage and who not – remember Hamlet’s father saying ‘I am dead’? Well, what of Robinson, and indeed Friday? Why is it important that Friday not be mentined? Clearly that Marx wants to say that even the isolated Robinson on his Island makes his objects according to a social code, not as an isolated individual. We are all social, even when it seems not. This is a key to anthropology isn’t it? But more, Pawler shows that Marx works this story up more and more over time. He explains that it is the bourgeois isolated individual that Marx has in mind, writing of ‘Robinsonades’ in The Poverty of Philosophyand again in the Grundrisse, the allegory in Capital is more developed than its first appearance, where ‘every man is a hermit and produces only for himself’ (Prawler1978:134). By the time of the Grundrisse ‘Robinsonaden’ offer ‘not the image of some primitive social organization, but as so clear a view of tendencies inherent in English society of the eighteenth century that they can serve as a symbolic adumbration of that society’s future. On closer examination the loneliness of Robinson Crusoe becomes a symbol for social alienation in the ‘civil society’ of the nineteenth century” (Pawler 1978:275-6). By the time of Capital Robinson is keeping a set of books, listing his possessions, and working out the sums of his own labour time, and presumably that of the unfortunate Friday. Here Pawler suggests Marx has found in Robinson the ‘character-type of “economic planners” in general and the “true-born Englishman” in particular … [and] … affords a simple model of economic activities in a setting in which the value of an object can be directly proportional to the quantity of labour expended upon it, undistorted by market considerations’ (Pawler 1978:335). Friday is not mentioned, yet would no doubt fit well and has often been recalled by postcolonial revision

The discussion of Robinson on his Island, as an English book-keeper, is Marx having his fun. The next moment we are to ‘transport ourselves from Robinson’s island, bathed in light to the European middle ages shrouded in Darkness’ where the hierarchy of serf and lord, compulsory labour, services, payments in kind, entails a society where the social relations are personal, and ‘not disguised under the social relations between the products of labour’ (Marx 1867/1970:77L&W). We need not go back to examine the different forms of common property, though Marx shows he has the scholarship to do this, but we can see the distribution of the work and consumption of produce in the peasant family is not one organized by commodities, but subject to arrangements of age, sex, the seasons, a spontaneously developed division of labour, etc.

Then, suggesting something different, but not yet the only possible difference, Marx asks us to ‘picture to ourselves, for a change, a community of free individuals, carrying on their work with the means of production in common’ (Marx, 1867/1970:78 L&W), social labour-power and social product, planned distribution, surplus consumed according to – in this, again not the only possible assumption – and distributed according to input of labour-time.

‘The social relations of the individual producers, with regard to both their labour and their products, are in this case perfectly simple and intelligible, and with regard not only to production but also to distribution’ (Marx 1867/1970:79 L&W)

There may be different forms in which this distribution is organized, according to the level of development of the productive forces, and a future communism would not assume distribution according to labour time but rather to each according to need, yet this scenario where production has stripped off its ‘mystical veil’ [this veil stuff is from Schiller’s The Bell, as Prawler shows, 1978:322) and is ‘consciously regulated’ in ‘accordance with a settled plan’ comes only at the expense of ‘a long and painful process’ (Marx 1867/1970:80 L&W). Marx’s point in the next pages is to show that the commodity as bourgeois form has everything reversed – like Dogberry in Much Ado About Nothing who things ‘reading and writing come by nature’ (Marx 1867/1970:83 L&W Pen.177, D.98).

Also want to read Ian Watt ‘Robinson Crusoe as Myth’ Essays in Criticism 1 1951 95-119…

Cotton for My Shroud – 6pm 16.1.2013

 

 

 

 

CANCELLED, or rather DIFFERENT FILM!

- news from the directors is that the people organising the premiere (due 19th Jan) have unfortunately balked at our screening, and instead we will have Nandan and Kavita present a curated selection of short films from the International Poetry Festival that they toured with in India – more details soon, same time, same place.Cotton-Invite-Goldsmiths 2

state execution by neglect?

This from Tom Henri. It looks to me to be an attempted State premeditated murder, aka Capital Punishment, for a minor offense. There is also an open letter to the Ministry of Justice, signed by various luminaries.

Scrubbed to death

Daniel Roque Hall suffers from Friedreich’s ataxia, this debilitating and fatal illness means he requires around the clock care.  In 2011 Daniel pleaded guilty to smuggling cocaine into the UK.  The judge sentenced Daniel to three years in prison, on the proviso that a prison place could be found which would meet his health care needs.  The Governor of Wormwood Scrubs (widely regarded as the London prison with the worst health facilities) stated that his prison could meet Daniel’s needs.  After three weeks of neglectful treatment in the Scrubs, Daniel was rushed to hospital and placed on a life support machine.  Without exaggeration, the care (or lack of) that Daniel received in prison nearly killed him.  His man has a fatal degenerate disease, he requires full-time care, he is no harm to anyone else and he need to be with his family – NOT in Wormwood Scrubs.  Earlier this week, Daniel and his family won a seven day reprieve on Daniel’s return to jail.

You can read more about Daniel’s story at http://www.guardian.co.uk/society/2013/jan/02/disabled-daniel-roque-hall-injunction-return-prison

Cotton – money – Bible – money – Brandy

by far and away the best response to lecture three ever….oldbeardo

Question Time Today

20130110-152210.jpg

Cotton For My Shroud – screening with the directors, 6pm 16.1.2013

 

CANCELLED, or rather DIFFERENT FILM!

- news from the directors is that the people organising the premiere (due 19th Jan) have unfortunately balked at our screening, and instead we will have Nandan and Kavita present a curated selection of short films from the International Poetry Festival that they toured with in India – more details soon, same time, same place.

Cotton-2

Screening with the filmmakers Nandan Saxena & Kavita Bahl – 6pm Lauri Grove Baths, Council Room, Centre for Cultural Studies, Goldsmiths

As Multinational Corporations that produced poisons for biological warfare during the cold war positioned their deadly wares as agricultural inputs, the last few decades have seen humans waging war upon themselves.

Vidarbha, in the Indian state of Maharashtra, has become a bloody battleground in this ongoing global war between corporate greed and the people’s ‘Right to life’.

‘Cotton for my shroud’ investigates how Monsanto manipulated Bt Cotton field trials, enticed farmers with lies about yields and reduction in pesticide use. Empty promises, escalating costs, dwindling yields and depressed cotton prices played havoc.

Since 1995, a quarter of a million Indian farmers have committed suicide – the largest wave of recorded suicides in human history.

Most of them were cotton farmers from Vidarbha.

While the state and the media label these deaths as suicide, the cotton fields of Vidarbha remain a mute witness to genocide.

Narrated in the first person, the film gives us a window into the drama and despair that forms the warp and weft of life at Vidarbha.

Screening  6pm Lauri Grove Baths, Council Room, Centre for Cultural Studies, Goldsmiths. All wellcome

Sophie Fuggle’s lecture course – Text and Image @ Goldsmiths mondays from Jan 7 2013

Text and Image 2013

Lectures open to the public. Starting this Monday, 7 January 2013.

11am-12noon. Ben Pimlott Lecture Theatre, Goldsmiths, University of London.

Films shown in conjunction with the course will be screened as part of the Monday film night. More details here.

Course Outline:

To present something is always to re-present it, to repeat it, to reproduce it and ultimately to reimagine it. There is no originary gesture here. The World was never a tabula rasa or blank canvas. Meaning has always been inscribed, scratched out and recarved onto its surfaces. The World itself is presented to us (and, indeed, by us) via repetition, a repetition which produces difference via the temporal and spatial interstices emerging from each turn and return, each citation and recitation.

This year’s course will explore the relationship between visual and textual modes of representation via the notions of difference and repetition. The task at hand is three-fold. Not only will this involve consideration of the processes of doubling which occur between texts and images and the blurring of the differences between the two forms and practices but at the same time, we will be attentive to the ways in which theories of text and image replicate this doubling in the language used to describe and analyse different aesthetic and textual/literary practices. Finally, and most importantly, we will explore the political and ethical dimensions of textual and visual objects and practices and the implications of the repetition of difference and the difference of repetition. What is at stake in the proliferation of signs and sign systems, the commodification of art through the mass reproduction and distribution techniques which reach their apotheosis in late capitalism? How might we read banality, loss and impoverishment of meaning against the potential for transgression, profanity and parody which emerges here?

image

Course Schedule:

I.               Taxonomies of Difference

7 January 2013 

An Introduction to the profanity of difference and the tyranny of repetition

Reading: Jorge Luis Borges – ‘Pierre Ménard, Author of the Quixote’ in Labyrinths (Penguin, 1986), pp.62-71.

Gilles Deleuze – Preface to Difference and Repetition (Columbia University Press, 1994), pp.xix-xxii.

14 January 2013 

Words and Things

Michel Foucault – ‘The Prose of the World’ in The Order of Things (Routledge, 2002), pp.19-50.

Giorgio Agamben – ‘Theory of Signatures’ in The Signature of All Things (Zone Books, 2009), pp.33-80.

Film: Helvetica (2007), Gary Hustwit (dir.)

II.              Frames of Reference

21 January 2013 

The Refracted Image

Walter Benjamin, ‘Art in the age of mechanical reproduction’ in One Way Street and Other Writings (Harmondsworth: Penguin, 2009), pp.228-259.

Available: http://www.marxists.org/reference/subject/philosophy/works/ge/benjamin.htm

Ariella Azoulay – ‘Civil Uses of Photography’ in Civil Imagination: A Political Ontology of Photography (Verso, 2012), pp.219-241.

28 January 2013 

Smoke Screens

Jean Baudrillard, The Evil Demon of Images (Power Institute of Art, 1986).

bell hooks, ‘The Oppositional Gaze: Black Female Spectators’ in Reel to Real: Race, Sex and Class at the Movies (London and New York, NY: Routledge, 1996), pp.197-213.

Gilles Deleuze – ‘Frame and Shot, Framing and Cutting’ in Cinema 1: The Movement Image(London: Continuum, 2005), pp.13-29.

Film: The Player (1992), Robert Altman (dir.)

4 February 2013 

Scar Tissue

Georges Didi-Huberman, ‘Legends of Photography’ in Invention of Hysteria: Charcot and the Photographic Iconography of the Salpêtrière (MIT Press, 2003), pp.29-66.

Steven Connor, ‘Disfiguring’ in Book of Skin (New York, NY: Cornell University Press, 2004), pp.73-94.

Film: The Pillow Book (1996), Peter Greenaway (dir.)

READING WEEK

III.            Mapping and Counter-Mapping

18 February 2013 

The Surface of the Earth

Martin Heidegger, ‘The Age of the World Picture’ in Off the Beaten Track (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2002), pp.57-85.

Paul Virilio, ‘June 1991: Desert Screen’ in Desert Screen (Continuum, 2005), pp.76-94.

25 February 2013 

Passports and Postcards

Jacques Derrida – ‘Envois’ (extracts) in The Post Card (University of Chicago Press, 1987), pp.3-256.

Amitava Kumar – Passport Photos (Berkeley, CA: California University Press, 2000).

Film: Erasing David (2010), David Bond and Melissa McDougall (dirs)

4 March 2013 

Alternative Cartographies

Rem Koolhaus, Delirious New York: A Retroactive Manifesto of Manhattan (New York, NY: Monacelli Press, 1994). (extracts)

Italo Calvino, Invisible Cities (Vintage, 1997).

IV.            Chronographies

11 March 2013 

Ghost Writing

Roland Barthes, Camera Lucida (Vintage, 2009).

Ulrich Baer, ‘Revision, Animation, Rescue’ in Spectral Evidence: The Photography of Trauma (The MIT Press, 2005), pp.127-178.

18 March 2013 

Back to the Future

Walter Benjamin, On the Concept of History including ‘The Paralipomena’ in Selected Writings: Volume Four(Cambridge, MA: Belknap Press, 2003), pp.389-411.

Available (minus the Paralipomena): http://www.sfu.ca/~andrewf/CONCEPT2.html

Jean-François Lyotard, ‘Rewriting Modernity’ in The Inhuman: Reflections on Time (Cambridge: Polity Press, 1998), pp.24-35.

Film: La Jetée (1962), Chris Marker (dir.)

Save Lewisham Hospital Demo – Sat 26th January 2013

JOIN THE DEMO through Lewisham and Catford on SATURDAY 26th JANUARY to show Jeremy Hunt what we think of the proposals to close Lewisham Hospital A&E, Intensive Care and some children and maternity services!

Join the 'Save Lewisham Hospital' Demo on Saturday 26th January

__________________

Also: BBC Question Time protest.

Please see below protest this Thursday 10th Jan, about Lewisham Hospital.

Details below from: http://www.savelewishamhospital.com/bbc-question-time-protest/

Join the protest at BBC TV Question Time – 10 January 2013, 17:30-21:30.

Richard Hoggart Building, Goldsmith’s University, Lewisham Way, SE14 6NW

Rail: New Cross or New Cross Gate
Buses: 21, 36, 53, 453, 436, 136, 321 Marquis of Granby / Lewisham Way stop

Gormley on a Plinth – Friday 18/01/2013 ICA 1pm.

Institute of Contemporary Arts

Culture Now: Antony Gormley

18 January 2013

Join us for a lunchtime talk with Antony Gormley

in conversation with Professor John Hutnyk.

Antony Gormley is known for his large-scale sculptures, which have become part of the topography of many cities around the world. His works investigate the body as a place of transformation and a vehicle for communication. Employing notions of geometry and the language of architecture, Gormley represents the body as an open place, exploring the connections with the space at large. He questions the relationship between the individual and the collective, often engaging the audience in active participation. In 2009 the artist’s workOne & Other was selected for the Fourth Plinth Commission, for which through an open call Gormley invited members of the public to spend one hour each on the vacant plinth.

Antony Gormley was born in 1950 in London, where he lives and works. After traveling for a few years he attended Central Saint Martins College of Art and Design and Goldsmiths London from 1974. He then studied sculpture at the Slade School of Fine Art, University College, London, between 1977 and 1979. Gormley has participated in major group exhibitions around the world, including the International Sculpture Biennale of Carrara (2008 and 2010), the Sydney Biennale (2006), Documenta VIII, Kassel, Germany (1987) the Venice Biennale (1982 and 1986).  He was awarded the Turner Prize in 1994 and made an Order of the British Empire (OBE) in 1997. He is an Honorary Fellow of the Royal Institute of British Architects, has been a Royal Academician since 2003 and a trustee of the British Museum since 2007.

Professor John Hutnyk is Academic Director of the Centre for Cultural Studies at Goldsmiths and author of several books, including The Rumour of Calcutta (1996), Critique of Exotica(2000) and Bad Marxism: Capitalism and Cultural Studies (2004). His most recent work is the edited volume Beyond Borders, Pavement Books, 2012.

How to Book here.

Marx’s letter to Abe.

The International Workingmen’s Association 1864

Address of the International Working Men’s Association to Abraham Lincoln, President of the United States of America

Presented to U.S. Ambassador Charles Francis Adams
January 28, 1865 [A]


Written: by Marx between November 22 & 29, 1864
First Published: The Bee-Hive Newspaper, No. 169, November 7, 1865;
Transcription/Markup: Zodiac/Brian Baggins;
Online Version: Marx & Engels Internet Archive (marxists.org) 2000.


 

Sir:

We congratulate the American people upon your re-election by a large majority. If resistance to the Slave Power was the reserved watchword of your first election, the triumphant war cry of your re-election is Death to Slavery.

From the commencement of the titanic American strife the workingmen of Europe felt instinctively that the star-spangled banner carried the destiny of their class. The contest for the territories which opened the dire epopee, was it not to decide whether the virgin soil of immense tracts should be wedded to the labor of the emigrant or prostituted by the tramp of the slave driver?

When an oligarchy of 300,000 slaveholders dared to inscribe, for the first time in the annals of the world, “slavery” on the banner of Armed Revolt, when on the very spots where hardly a century ago the idea of one great Democratic Republic had first sprung up, whence the first Declaration of the Rights of Man was issued, and the first impulse given to the European revolution of the eighteenth century; when on those very spots counterrevolution, with systematic thoroughness, gloried in rescinding “the ideas entertained at the time of the formation of the old constitution”, and maintained slavery to be “a beneficent institution”, indeed, the old solution of the great problem of “the relation of capital to labor”, and cynically proclaimed property in man “the cornerstone of the new edifice” — then the working classes of Europe understood at once, even before the fanatic partisanship of the upper classes for the Confederate gentry had given its dismal warning, that the slaveholders’ rebellion was to sound the tocsin for a general holy crusade of property against labor, and that for the men of labor, with their hopes for the future, even their past conquests were at stake in that tremendous conflict on the other side of the Atlantic. Everywhere they bore therefore patiently the hardships imposed upon them by the cotton crisis, opposed enthusiastically the proslavery intervention of their betters — and, from most parts of Europe, contributed their quota of blood to the good cause.

While the workingmen, the true political powers of the North, allowed slavery to defile their own republic, while before the Negro, mastered and sold without his concurrence, they boasted it the highest prerogative of the white-skinned laborer to sell himself and choose his own master, they were unable to attain the true freedom of labor, or to support their European brethren in their struggle for emancipation; but this barrier to progress has been swept off by the red sea of civil war.

The workingmen of Europe feel sure that, as the American War of Independence initiated a new era of ascendancy for the middle class, so the American Antislavery War will do for the working classes. They consider it an earnest of the epoch to come that it fell to the lot of Abraham Lincoln, the single-minded son of the working class, to lead his country through the matchless struggle for the rescue of an enchained race and the reconstruction of a social world. [B]

Signed on behalf of the International Workingmen’s Association, the Central Council:

Longmaid, Worley, Whitlock, Fox, Blackmore, Hartwell, Pidgeon, Lucraft, Weston, Dell, Nieass, Shaw, Lake, Buckley, Osbourne, Howell, Carter, Wheeler, Stainsby, Morgan, Grossmith, Dick, Denoual, Jourdain, Morrissot, Leroux, Bordage, Bocquet, Talandier, Dupont, L.Wolff, Aldovrandi, Lama, Solustri, Nusperli, Eccarius, Wolff, Lessner, Pfander, Lochner, Kaub, Bolleter, Rybczinski, Hansen, Schantzenbach, Smales, Cornelius, Petersen, Otto, Bagnagatti, Setacci;

George Odger, President of the Council; P.V. Lubez, Corresponding Secretary for France; Karl Marx, Corresponding Secretary for Germany; G.P. Fontana, Corresponding Secretary for Italy; J.E. Holtorp, Corresponding Secretary for Poland; H.F. Jung, Corresponding Secretary for Switzerland; William R. Cremer, Honorary General Secretary.

18 Greek Street, Soho.


[A] From the minutes of the Central (General) Council of the International — November 19, 1864:

“Dr. Marx then brought up the report of the subcommittee, also a draft of the address which had been drawn up for presentation to the people of America congratulating them on their having re-elected Abraham Lincoln as President. The address is as follows and was unanimously agreed to.”

[B] The minutes of the meeting continue:

“A long discussion then took place as to the mode of presenting the address and the propriety of having a M.P. with the deputation; this was strongly opposed by many members, who said workingmen should rely on themselves and not seek for extraneous aid…. It was then proposed… and carried unanimously. The secretary correspond with the United States Minister asking to appoint a time for receiving the deputation, such deputation to consist of the members of the Central Council.”

Public Lecture with George Caffentzis – now 31 Jan 2013

The making of a debt resistors’ movement: From Occupy Wall Street to Strike
Debt //

The financial crisis in the US officially began in September 2008, but the
first mass street response arose in September 2011 with the Occupy Wall
Street movement. Since then Strike Debt, a debt resistors’ organization,
emerged out of Occupy. George Caffentzis will discuss debt resistance as a
working class project and the prospects of Strike Debt in the context of
previous debt resistance movements.

// TIME AND DATE CHANGE // 


Apologies for any inconvenience (please forward and share to help spread the word) – due to circumstances beyond our control and very much in the control of multi-national airlines, please be advised of
 
- NEW TIME AND DATE FOR GEORGE CAFFENTZIS PUBLIC LECTURE – 
 
THURSDAY 31st JAN
TIME: 6pm
VENUE: NEW ACADEMIC BUILDING, LG01
GOLDSMITHS COLLEGE

*This event is organised in collaboration with the Centre for Cultural
Studies <http://www.gold.ac.uk/cultural-studies/>, PM
Press<http://www.pmpress.org>and Common
Notions <http://commonnotions.org/>. *

*George Caffentzis* is a Professor of Philosophy at the University of
Southern Maine. He was a founding member of the Midnight Notes
Collective<http://www.midnightnotes.org/> and
coordinator of the Committee for Academic Freedom in Africa. He is the
author and editor of many books and articles, his latest is *In Letters of
Blood and Fire**: Work, Machines and the Crisis of Capitalism* (PM Press:
Feb 2013)

*Special Offer at the Public Lecture*: pre-order your copy of *In Letters
of Blood and Fire: Work, Machines, and
Value<https://secure.pmpress.org/index.php?l=product_detail&p=424>(Feb
2013, PM Press)
*by* *George Caffentzis and receive 20 % off and free postage.

*In Letters of Blood and Fire:*
Karl Marx remarked that the only way to write about the origins of
capitalism is in the letters of blood and fire used to drive workers from
the common lands, forests, and waters in the sixteenth century. In this
collection of essays, George Caffentzis argues that the same is true for
the annals of twenty-first-century capitalism. Information technology,
immaterial production, financialization, and globalization have been
trumpeted as inaugurating a new phase of capitalism that puts it beyond its
violent origins. Instead of being a period of major social and economic
novelty, however, the course of recent decades has been a return to the
fire and blood of struggles at the advent of capitalism.

For media, review copies or event enquires please contact Camille
Barbagallo camille [at] pmpress.org


Camille Barbagallo

PM Press
BM Box 5239
London WC1N 3XX
+44 (0)7981070417 | +44 (0) 203 222 5130
www.pmpress.org


PO Box 23912
Oakland CA 94623
+ 1 510 – 658 – 3906
info[at]pmpress.org

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